Need help understanding Significance Watch

helpmeimstuck1
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Could anyone explain to me what significance means and how I can calculate it in layman's terms please? Had a lesson on it and seeing as it was all new to me, I didn't fully understand it. - Help would be appreciated, ty.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by helpmeimstuck1)
Could anyone explain to me what significance means and how I can calculate it in layman's terms please? Had a lesson on it and seeing as it was all new to me, I didn't fully understand it. - Help would be appreciated, ty.
Is this statistiscal significance? It's not clear from your post.
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helpmeimstuck1
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Is this statistiscal significance? It's not clear from your post.
Ah yes, stuff like p > 0.05 and what not
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Muttley79
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(Original post by helpmeimstuck1)
Ah yes, stuff like p > 0.05 and what not
Are you using a chi-test? Significance is used in a number of statistical tests. The level e.g. 5% is how likely the result is by chance rather than because the hypothesis is true.

I'd go and get some 1 to 1 help as I'm not sure we'll explain it well enough - maybe look at an A level maths book/website?
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beyknowles2
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(Original post by helpmeimstuck1)
Could anyone explain to me what significance means and how I can calculate it in layman's terms please? Had a lesson on it and seeing as it was all new to me, I didn't fully understand it. - Help would be appreciated, ty.
Basically when you have a set of results, you can carry out a statistical test like chi-squared which will tell you whether the difference between the results you obtained are significantly different to the results you would expect from your hypothesis, or if not, the difference between the observed and expected results can be said to be due to chance.

In A Level Psychology we do tests to a 0.5% probability, what this means is that if you analyse your results statistically using chi-squared and find that your observed value (the value you got from your study) exceeds the critical value (the value that would be expected if the hypothesis is correct), then there is a 95% probability that this was due to chance and you accept the null hypothesis and reject the alternative hypothesis.

Hope that helps, let me know if not.

It seems more complicated than it actually is. I'd suggest speaking to your teacher if you need him/her to explain it to you more thoroughly.
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