The Student Room Group
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London

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Reply 1
Hi Janol,

Well as i am also doing the MSc in F and E this year, i hope that the wages are pretty good.
i cant imagine any graduates from any other courses getting paid higher than the average MSc in F and E graduate, unless they are MBAs from a few of the top unis.
I have heard that we can expect to recieve a starting salary of about 50 grand a year, 15 grand up or down.
its good to see someone else plans to work in the city, as whoever else i have spoken to seems to want to get into research.
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London
Reply 2
I´m going to the MSc in F&E too, and also expect to work in the city after graduating. I agree with Cyrus about our employment perspectives, though I think that other aspects such as work experience and how well you do in the interviews may be even more important.
Here an example of what I´m saying:

http://www.efinancialcareers.com/article_270.cfm?storyref=18500000000046950&section=19
Hi everybody !

I'll also be doing the MSc F&E this yr. I think most of this MSc graduates enter as analysts in graduate programs of IBanks , or in some hedge funds.
Of course it depends on previous work experience and education, and of your interview skills.
About the salary, I heard about 35 a yr + bonus
Reply 4
hi,guys,im going to have LSE FE too.Have you noticed on the job placement record on LSE website,the graduates from A&F did much better than those from F&E?
http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/accountingAndFinance/pros-stds/destinations/index.htm

I sent a message to department coordinator Dophy to ask for an explanation, but didnt get any reply.

Do you guys figure out whats the reason?
Reply 5
hi,
I know a guy who dropped out of f&e and went into acc and fin.
he told me that the reason that people in the first course dont get as many jobs or whatever as the latter is because the workload is so intense that people hardly have time to go through the whole job application process in f and e. god knows how far thats true!
also most people doing f and e go on to do some sort of research.
Reply 6
Cyrus
hi,
I know a guy who dropped out of f&e and went into acc and fin.


my understanding is he couldnt handle the pressure therefore taking the Accounting and Finance was the easier way out.

As for why accounting students seem to get better placement?

I dont know! What i do know is MSc Accounting and Finance can be done on part time basis, therefore I would imagine a reasonable proportion of students are already working in the City.

My two pence only.
Reply 7
The fact is that there are more A&F graduates than F&E ones.

Student Numbers:

Session: 99-00 00-01 01-02 Total
MSc A&F: 69 76 133 278
MSc F&E 44 50 79 173

Besides, I agree with Cyrus that more people doing F&E go on to do some sort of research
Reply 8
i'm interested in this course! what kind of grades did u get in ur GCSE's and ALevels? What work experience places did u do? Can u give me any advice?

Cheers
Reply 9
hi,hopefully I can help u.but im from China,have no idea about what "GCSE's and ALevels" is.sorry. :redface:
Hi
Well I'll try to help you then.
Got highest honors at Baccalaureat( equivalent of ALevels in France), then went to a "grande ecole" (sort of equivalent of top uni), majoring in stats and econ.
Work experience : summer internship in business consutancy + part time & summer internships in an IBank.
If ur British, you won't need this Master : BSc is enough to go into banking, then MBA is better to become an associate
Reply 11
dear all,

i did a BA in economics and statistics from bombay university, india. i did my GRE and got an 800 in the quant section. i have just graduated and am 21 years old. will probably be the youngest or one of the youngest in the class.
quite worried about whether i will be able to cope on this course as my bachelors was not of a very high level. havent done any interships of any value.
Hi Cyrus !
Well u wont be the youngest, I'll be only 20 :wink:
Reply 13
Hi Cyrus !
Well u wont be the youngest, I'll be only 20 :wink:


the age of an undergraduate....
(edited 9 years ago)
Reply 14
hi caroline,
its good to hear that i wont be the only person straight froma BA.
we both seem to have done our BA's in economics and stats. my economics level was really pathetic, but i think my stats should stand me in good stead in this course.
my lack of a good bachelors is a great worry to me, as i do not have much of a knowledge of finance and my econ is of a poor level.
just hoping it all goes well.
Reply 15
Cyrus,
I just finished my BA as well. You're not alone! I'm sure your statistics background will be more than enough for the LSE courses. I was lucky enough to draw a tough Indian Econometrics Prof who really drilled the material into us. At the time I complained, but I'm really glad she did it.

As for job prospects, at least in the US LSE is very well known. I'm from the Boston area, and I haven't come across anyone who Doesn't know the school. It's quite common for Harvard BA's to go to LSE, so I think the quality of the school speaks for itself. Also, British degrees are well regarded in the US, (US schools aren't nearly as tough except at the Ph.D level) so it bodes well for employment. I was impressed by the amount of companies that recruit directly at LSE too.

There is growing sentiment in the US (and I'm sure elsewhere) that the MBA is overrated. A noted Stanford professor has published studies essentially saying that the value of an MBA depends on the school. Unless the MBA is from a Top 10 school it really isn't worth much. MBA's around here are a dime a dozen, so unless you're from Harvard, Wharton, MIT Sloan and others, it doesn't make much of a difference. His point was, students who get into those Top tier schools likely would have done well anyway considering their talent. I chose this MSc program b/c I felt it gave a wide array of sectors to work in. I really don't think you can go wrong with a LSE Fin and Econ degree.

See you all in September!
SV
Reply 16
yeah, my level of statistics should help me in the course, but the level of econ i have done is pathetic to say the least.
to give you an idea, in india, we use the same text book in our first year of MA that LSE uses in its first year undergrad. so you can imagine what the standard is!
i just hope the workload isnt too much. have heard it can go upto 10 to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week. i guess it all depends on the individual, but this is said to be the expected workload.
i am also wondering when exactly the course ends next year, as most people say it ends first week of july, but the certificate we all get in the tracking system say the course ends on 31st july.
any inputs?
Cyrus
yeah, my level of statistics should help me in the course, but the level of econ i have done is pathetic to say the least.
to give you an idea, in india, we use the same text book in our first year of MA that LSE uses in its first year undergrad. so you can imagine what the standard is!

i am also wondering when exactly the course ends next year, as most people say it ends first week of july, but the certificate we all get in the tracking system say the course ends on 31st july.
any inputs?


The course is effectively over by the first week of July; you get your degree certificate printed out on the 31st of July. Which is the date the system refers to. But once you hand in your essay and finish your last exam, that's it- you can leave LSE then and there, you are not required to do anything else, altho' your library card and email will be valid for another few months.

I also seriously doubt that the MA Econ textbook in India is the same as the first-year textbook at the LSE. They might be using Varian's Microeconomic Analysis in your MA, which is what the level I M.Sc. courses at LSE also use. There is, however, a "baby Varian" called "Intermediate Microeconomics" which is used by first-year LSE students and second-year students in most American universities.

I'm sure you can do quite well, given what you describe about your background; of course you have to work rather hard.
Cyrus
yeah, my level of statistics should help me in the course, but the level of econ i have done is pathetic to say the least.
to give you an idea, in india, we use the same text book in our first year of MA that LSE uses in its first year undergrad. so you can imagine what the standard is!

Well, I would like to absolutely disagree with Cyrus when he mentions the above. Here, in India, like anyother place, u have several universities n the syllabi n references vary greatly. Having said that, one cannot make such generalizing statements. I am currently enrolled in the MA Econ programme in India. We never have any 'Textbooks' as such. We do have reference books, which include the likes of Green, Romer, Mas-Colell, Mansfield, Mankiw, Ackley, Judge, Pindyck, Holly,Chow,Chiang...to name just a few!
Hope this helps see the MA Econ course in India ( at least at Mumbai University)from a better perspective. Everytjing ultimately boils down to ur own research!

BTW, I have been offered a deferred admission at LSE for MSc Econ.
n I am sorry if I sound a bit rude.....I just cannot take such sweeping statements.
Reply 19
the teachers might refer to certain texts but on the whole the standard of economics ESPECIALLY AT MUMBAI UNIVERSITY IS CRAP!!!! i did a BA from St. xaviers which is as good as you'll get in mubai university and the standard was pathetic.
delhi university is slightly better.
when i asked a MA student about the main text they used for micro in their first year, they said it was VARIAN INTERMEDIATE ECON, not even the more advanced one.

buddy, i wish you were correct about the standard of econ in mumbai, as it would be to my advantage as well.
however, these are harsh realities and.......

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