HanElinor
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I'm thinking of applying for it at Bristol. Is it a good course? I will be accredited by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA). Is this just as valued by employers as, say, the Institute of Mechanical Engineers accreditation? I would like to go into engineering, so would this give me a good career path?
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Smack
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(Original post by HanElinor)
I'm thinking of applying for it at Bristol. Is it a good course? I will be accredited by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA). Is this just as valued by employers as, say, the Institute of Mechanical Engineers accreditation? I would like to go into engineering, so would this give me a good career path?
I don't know exactly what the path will be, but it will likely be different than if you studied a traditional engineering discipline.

In terms of the value of accreditation, they aren't aligned into some sort of hierarchy. What matters is that the relevant body has accredited the degree - so for example if a company is looking to recruit a structural engineer, that their degree was accredited by the ICE or IStructE etc.
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bigboateng_
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(Original post by HanElinor)
I'm thinking of applying for it at Bristol. Is it a good course? I will be accredited by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA). Is this just as valued by employers as, say, the Institute of Mechanical Engineers accreditation? I would like to go into engineering, so would this give me a good career path?
Yes it is. The Engineering mathematics course is a good mix of mathematics, engineering and programming. It teaches you a lot about modelling, control theory and optimization which is probably amongst the most needed skills in engineering right now. If you want to go into things like developing software/AI unmanned aircraft's, self driving cars, buses, trains, anything that involves automation for the matter, then this course is a good one. Also compared to most other engineering roles where people sit in-front of a desk number crunching into excel and what not, if you become a control/dynamics engineer in the end your job will be exciting. although you will be using software like Matlab and simulink you still get to use maths that isn't just adding and subtracting. You also study fundamentals of engineering like fluid mechanics and thermo so you will pretty much be employable just as any other engineering like mechanical, apart from specialized fields like Propulsion or something. It's looks like a mech eng course except all your 'optional' modules is chosen for you
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yang323
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(Original post by HanElinor)
I'm thinking of applying for it at Bristol. Is it a good course? I will be accredited by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA). Is this just as valued by employers as, say, the Institute of Mechanical Engineers accreditation? I would like to go into engineering, so would this give me a good career path?
I already submitted my application to engineering mathematics in Bristol a week ago. I was so excited when I saw this course, because I really love mathematical modeling. It is fun and useful in every aspect of engineering in modern days. Basically, it's about developing algorithms to make things efficient. The course is a good mix of math, computing and physics. I believe you can find a positions in developing algorithms in every engineering company for graduates if you like to. All in all, IT IS a good course if you love applied mathematics and engineering.


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NI BOY
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I am considering doing Engineering Mathematics at Bristol in September 2017. I am a lower sixth pupil who is studying maths, physics, ICT and business studies. I hope to receive 3 A*s and 1A (A in physics). I was planning to do mechanical engineering but this course interests me because I love applied maths. Are the career prospects good when doing this course or would I be wiser doing mechanical engineering? Since this is such a rare course, could anyone please point me in the right direction for any more information about it?
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Basiji
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i find this course really stupid. there's a reason why Bristol is the only uni in the UK to offer it. i mean wtf is it.

i recommend doing a proper engineering degree or just do straight up mathematics. i mean it has engineering maths, fluids, application of electronics and programming. the only unique unit it has is mathematical modelling!?

engineering maths is compulsory for all engineering degrees. application of electronics is also compulsory for all engineering degrees apart from EEE (obviously), programming unit is shared by EEE which just leaves mathematical modelling. i'm just confused as to what it is and how it differentiates you from other engineers.

also if you're thinking about career prospects, electrical and electronic engineering is the most employable engineering degree out there (personally the most interesting as well since society is so dependant on technology nowadays).
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HanElinor
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I've firmed this course in Bristol and I've also asked the professors of the course about career prospects. Any engineering degree from Bristol univeristy will get you in a good job, they are extremely sought after. One professor said how the accreditation doesn't matter to most companies and they see this degree just on the same level as the mechanical or electrical. You can go into any field of engineering with further study if you want to, this is more of a general course for someone who has a wide interest in engineering (which I do)
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Mentally
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(Original post by Basiji)
i find this course really stupid. there's a reason why Bristol is the only uni in the UK to offer it. i mean wtf is it.

i recommend doing a proper engineering degree or just do straight up mathematics. i mean it has engineering maths, fluids, application of electronics and programming. the only unique unit it has is mathematical modelling!?

engineering maths is compulsory for all engineering degrees. application of electronics is also compulsory for all engineering degrees apart from EEE (obviously), programming unit is shared by EEE which just leaves mathematical modelling. i'm just confused as to what it is and how it differentiates you from other engineers.

also if you're thinking about career prospects, electrical and electronic engineering is the most employable engineering degree out there (personally the most interesting as well since society is so dependant on technology nowadays).
How do you still have a red in 2016?
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NI BOY
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Will I be as employable as a graduate with a masters in mechanical engineering?
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Basiji
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(Original post by Mentally)
How do you still have a red in 2016?
i'm a veteran brah.

don't rep me. those red gems are the only thing i have left in my life.

edit: **** i used to have four red gems!!!
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Mentally
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(Original post by Basiji)
i'm a veteran brah.

don't rep me. those red gems are the only thing i have left in my life.

edit: **** i used to have four red gems!!!
Ive lost mine a while back. Take my advice btw, don't tell people not rep you if you want to stay red.
Thats how i lost mine
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S.mutans
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homogeneous function: H[xt, yt]
Euler's theorem
1st d: x Hx + y Hy = nH
2nd d: xx Hxx + 2 xy Hxy + yy Hyy = n[n-1]H

Which year of the course Euler's theorem will be taught?
I am searching for some Lecture Notes.

Thank you Thank you Thank thank you
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