Selling a SORN car Watch

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CJ
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So I've recently bought a new car, and the old ones tax and insurance is about to run out.

I've been advertising it for short while already, hoping it would be snapped up before the tax and insurance runs out (it sailed through MOT a month ago).

So now I'll be declaring it SORN, and sods law someone has called up and wants to view at the weekend (tax and insurance expired by then).

I guess my question is... would it put you off buying a car that's SORN? The ad doesn't mention it, mainly because I hoped it would be gone by now.

I considered paying a day's worth of insurance (£25 ish is the best i can find so far) and a month's worth of tax (not sure how much exactly, maybe £15), but since it'll only sell for around £500 - 600 I don't want it to eat into that too if I shouldn't need to.

What do you think? I know under new tax laws he should insure it himself ASAP anyway, but would it put you off? Or shall I just be blunt with him and say he needs to tax and insure before he leaves... IF he buys it. Thoughts?
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Zerforax
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(Original post by CJ)
So I've recently bought a new car, and the old ones tax and insurance is about to run out.

I've been advertising it for short while already, hoping it would be snapped up before the tax and insurance runs out (it sailed through MOT a month ago).

So now I'll be declaring it SORN, and sods law someone has called up and wants to view at the weekend (tax and insurance expired by then).

I guess my question is... would it put you off buying a car that's SORN? The ad doesn't mention it, mainly because I hoped it would be gone by now.

I considered paying a day's worth of insurance (£25 ish is the best i can find so far) and a month's worth of tax (not sure how much exactly, maybe £15), but since it'll only sell for around £500 - 600 I don't want it to eat into that too if I shouldn't need to.

What do you think? I know under new tax laws he should insure it himself ASAP anyway, but would it put you off? Or shall I just be blunt with him and say he needs to tax and insure before he leaves... IF he buys it. Thoughts?
Road tax does not transfer anymore so the buyer will need to tax it himself anyway.

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/vehicle-tax-changes
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Dez
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The buyer would need to tax/insure it straight away anyway, under the new laws vehicle tax is non-transferable. So a SORN isn't likely to make any difference, practically speaking, and so arguably the buyer doesn't actually need to know you don't currently have it taxed since it won't impact the sale in any way.
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domonict
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how will you tax the car without insurance that is valid for the DVLA to check?

ie you need to have a month's insurance ( possibly more) before the bots at DVLA allow tax to be bought.
You also run the risk of paying more to cancel the insurance. My g/f ended up with a large bill when she sorn'd her car due to going abroad. The RAC had a cancellation fee on top of the policy.

you then have to presume that the car will sell within one month and in time for DVLA to refund 11 months of tax, rather than 10
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CJ
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(Original post by Dez)
The buyer would need to tax/insure it straight away anyway, under the new laws vehicle tax is non-transferable. So a SORN isn't likely to make any difference, practically speaking, and so arguably the buyer doesn't actually need to know you don't currently have it taxed since it won't impact the sale in any way.
Yeah I guess that's true. I think I'll just make sure he's aware (if he wants to buy) that that's what he's got to do.

I just have this image of the boys in blue pulling him over as he heads home, intending to do it when he gets home. But that shouldn't become my problem really! I'm more interesting in just selling the thing!
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Dez
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(Original post by CJ)
Yeah I guess that's true. I think I'll just make sure he's aware (if he wants to buy) that that's what he's got to do.

I just have this image of the boys in blue pulling him over as he heads home, intending to do it when he gets home. But that shouldn't become my problem really! I'm more interesting in just selling the thing!
It can all be done online now so it shouldn't take long. He does need to sort it out before driving the vehicle away, though.
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domonict
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most of the issues will be getting someone to buy a car without being able to test drive it.
I wouldn't buy one under the same circumstances.
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KCLeblanc
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You can now pay car tax monthly via direct debit.
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CJ
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(Original post by domonict)
most of the issues will be getting someone to buy a car without being able to test drive it.
I wouldn't buy one under the same circumstances.
I guess in any private sale situation you legally shouldn't be allowing another person to test drive the car as they're not insured (unless you have specific insurance). Luckily we live in a closed residential area I'd be happy for him to do a mini test drive up/down the road if he wants.

I've bought a couple of cars in the past, but never sold one before (as you can probably tell).
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Dez
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(Original post by CJ)
I guess in any private sale situation you legally shouldn't be allowing another person to test drive the car as they're not insured (unless you have specific insurance). Luckily we live in a closed residential area I'd be happy for him to do a mini test drive up/down the road if he wants.

I've bought a couple of cars in the past, but never sold one before (as you can probably tell).
If you have insurance on the car and the buyer's insurance on their own car allows them to drive other cars under TPO, then a test drive would be fine. But as you own the car it'd be your responsibility to make sure the buyer was properly insured (and licensed, for that matter), which is a complete ballache for a private seller.
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domonict
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I had an old Nissan that was MOT'd but tax and insurance ran out after I bought a new(er) replacement.
It was still an ok runabout but wasn't really worth very much as the paint was terrible, and the electric windows were held sit with a bit of wood.

In the end I donated it to the fire brigade as they need to practice taking roofs off then sell the car for scrap.
At the time, scrap price were terrible and the thought of tyre kickers "negotiating" on a couple of hundred quid was too much of a pain.
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JC.
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(Original post by CJ)
Yeah I guess that's true. I think I'll just make sure he's aware (if he wants to buy) that that's what he's got to do.

I just have this image of the boys in blue pulling him over as he heads home, intending to do it when he gets home. But that shouldn't become my problem really! I'm more interesting in just selling the thing!
Punters problem, not yours.
Just make sure you put a date and a time on the receipt you write out as the car will still be on the system as registered to you.

I've sold cars to people that I know full well have driven off without insurance. I once flogged a car that wasn't MOT'd that was just driven away.
Like I said, what the buyer does with their property after they have handed over the cash is down to them...
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Dez
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(Original post by JC.)
Punters problem, not yours.
Just make sure you put a date and a time on the receipt you write out as the car will still be on the system as registered to you.

I've sold cars to people that I know full well have driven off without insurance. I once flogged a car that wasn't MOT'd that was just driven away.
Like I said, what the buyer does with their property after they have handed over the cash is down to them...
Sort of… If you know a crime has taken place but don't report it you are technically an accomplice. So this may not be the best approach, although plod will have a tough time proving that you definitely knew a crime had taken place (maybe that driver was taking the car straight down to the MOT centre?).
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JC.
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(Original post by Dez)
Sort of… If you know a crime has taken place but don't report it you are technically an accomplice. So this may not be the best approach, although plod will have a tough time proving that you definitely knew a crime had taken place (maybe that driver was taking the car straight down to the MOT centre?).
That'll be very difficult to prove. They wouldn't even attempt to prosecute someone for that.
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Fed-UpNannystate
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I am in the same position, if you sorn it you cannot demonstrate it to anyone, except on your own drive, I had someone coming to view the car which I had just paid out for a new mot at £59 + took out a monthly road tax + £20 the day the viewing was due + £20 for two day temporary insurance cover + £19.95 auto trader advert total outlay £118.95.
was offered £350 cash. and may not follow through.....!!!!
Car is priced at £410.
Dilemma:- do I now spend more money on temporary insurance at £162 for 28 days and another months road tax At £20 a month in the hope of a buyer turning up...!!! total outlay will then be £300.95! I might just as well scrap a perfectly reliable high spec. car that has many years life in it. Perhaps this was the intention of this Govt to clear the road of older cars and create a market for new high priced vehicles which govt issues false Mpg figures to back up the manufacturers who have lied through their teeth by issuing false MPG readings (VW)
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Rabbit2
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The purchaser can always rent a tow dolly and tow it off. In the states anyway, towed vehicles don't need tags or insurance. If the purchaser(s) have access to a 'closed area' - like a private industrial park or such - they can 'road test' to their heart's content, as it's not open to the public. There was a court case a few years ago here, where the owner of a parking lot hired someone who was on a 'revoked' license to park cars. Customers were not allowed to enter the lot. You brought your car to the entrance, and the staff would whisk it away and park it. When you returned, you presented your claim check & the staff retrieved your car. The cops claimed that the hired person could not legally drive. It turned out, since the garage was private property, that the owner controlled who could and could not drive on his property. The general public, in fact was NOT allowed to drive there. The case was thrown out. Cheers.
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RoyalSheepy
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(Original post by Rabbit2)
The purchaser can always rent a tow dolly and tow it off. In the states anyway, towed vehicles don't need tags or insurance. If the purchaser(s) have access to a 'closed area' - like a private industrial park or such - they can 'road test' to their heart's content, as it's not open to the public. There was a court case a few years ago here, where the owner of a parking lot hired someone who was on a 'revoked' license to park cars. Customers were not allowed to enter the lot. You brought your car to the entrance, and the staff would whisk it away and park it. When you returned, you presented your claim check & the staff retrieved your car. The cops claimed that the hired person could not legally drive. It turned out, since the garage was private property, that the owner controlled who could and could not drive on his property. The general public, in fact was NOT allowed to drive there. The case was thrown out. Cheers.
This thread is 3 years old... Please check thread dates in future.

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