Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by naelse)
    UCL replied that, as far as they were concerned, DT wasn't a proper subject and wasn't relevant to Engineering, and that if she dropped Further Maths they would take it as though she only had 2 A levels, and therefore couldn't fulfill her offer.
    What a load of f**king b**locks! :mad:

    Shame on UCL.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shiny)
    What a load of f**king b**locks! :mad:

    Shame on UCL.
    I wouldn't agree. They gave an offer on the premise that the candidate would be taking Further Maths A-level; achieving a high grade in this proves a great deal of ability. Furthermore, it provides preparation for an Engineering course. I think UCL were fully justified in their decision.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by H&E)
    I wouldn't agree. They gave an offer on the premise that the candidate would be taking Further Maths A-level; achieving a high grade in this proves a great deal of ability. Furthermore, it provides preparation for an Engineering course. I think UCL were fully justified in their decision.
    I meant the DT not relevant to Engineering bit.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by H&E)
    I wouldn't agree. They gave an offer on the premise that the candidate would be taking Further Maths A-level; achieving a high grade in this proves a great deal of ability. Furthermore, it provides preparation for an Engineering course. I think UCL were fully justified in their decision.
    but DT provides preparation for Engineering too. It's not like she spent the year making little wooden toys- she was using very complex structures and electronics. To say that it doesn't count as an A level is a bit harsh.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by naelse)
    but DT provides preparation for Engineering too. It's not like she spent the year making little wooden toys- she was using very complex structures and electronics. To say that it doesn't count as an A level is a bit harsh.
    UCL made her an offer based upon her applicatoin; she then majorly changed it. They have every right to change their response. You could argue the pro's and con's, and I'm sure UCL did; they made their decision, as they had every right to.

    I agree they were harsh about DT: perhaps it was their way of making sure she did FM.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by H&E)
    UCL made her an offer based upon her applicatoin; she then majorly changed it. They have every right to change their response. You could argue the pro's and con's, and I'm sure UCL did; they made their decision, as they had every right to.

    I agree they were harsh about DT: perhaps it was their way of making sure she did FM.
    The point that she made at the time was that her offer was based on 3 A levels, but they didn't specify what they wanted in each subject, and she was taking 4. So she could have stopped doing any Further Maths work, taken the exam, gotten a U, and they still would have had to accept her if she fulfilled the offer. But you're right, maybe they just wanted her to do some FM no matter what she got in it.

    It's all madness...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Every year people get caught out by this. Remember that even though your offer may only be based on 3 A-Levels, the university is also basing it on the expectation that you will complete all the qualificated stated on your UCAS form. In most cases you can drop a subject it won't bother anybody, but if you do, the university has every right to modify your offer.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    Every year people get caught out by this. Remember that even though your offer may only be based on 3 A-Levels, the university is also basing it on the expectation that you will complete all the qualificated stated on your UCAS form. In most cases you can drop a subject it won't bother anybody, but if you do, the university has every right to modify your offer.
    Having got a little carried away with impressing the college, someone I know at Eton has been forced to teach himself an A-level from scratch and sit 3 AEA papers this year. Apparently in the acceptance letter, the college specifically mentioned that they expect him to do all the huge amount of work he claimed to be planning.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by H&E)
    Having got a little carried away with impressing the college, someone I know at Eton has been forced to teach himself an A-level from scratch and sit 3 AEA papers this year. Apparently in the acceptance letter, the college specifically mentioned that they expect him to do all the huge amount of work he claimed to be planning.
    Are they actually part of his offer? If not surely he could just sit them and get U's. AEAs shouldn't be any extra work anyway, just an extra 9 hours of exams.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    Are they actually part of his offer? If not surely he could just sit them and get U's. AEAs shouldn't be any extra work anyway, just an extra 9 hours of exams.
    Not sure about the details. Perhaps they demanded passes. I suppose they may have specified a grade in AEA English, given he applied for that. Doubt it though. I think it's more a matter of pride for him - he got straight A*'s at GCSE, and A's at AS, doesn't want to blot his copeybook as it were.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by H&E)
    Not sure about the details. Perhaps they demanded passes. I suppose they may have specified a grade in AEA English, given he applied for that. Doubt it though. I think it's more a matter of pride for him - he got straight A*'s at GCSE, and A's at AS, doesn't want to blot his copeybook as it were.
    Unfortunately excessive pride got him in this position in the first place. Thankfully Eton are fairly good at producing "exam machines" so he should be fine - it goes to show that Admissions Tutors remember pretty much everything though, I bet he thought he got away with that.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Media Studies is slowly becomeing more respected but generally anything ending in studies is a joke. You can't spell studies without spelling an anagram of uditess .... and that's not even a word, proving my point that it must be a joke
 
 
 
Poll
Are you going to a festival?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.