marcobruni98
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#21
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#21
(Original post by TraineeBMS)
If you don't want to work in the NHS then accreditation and registration isn't an issue. Be aware that when you talk about a 'Biomedical Scientist' you are discussing a HCPC registered scientist, with which 99% will work in the NHS. It's actually a protected title, hence a non-registered scientist is not a Biomedical Scientist, and it is illegal for a person to refer to themselves as such.
Very interesting! I thought that was clinical scientist but I guess you are right. Thanks for the reply again.
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atagirl01
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#22
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Hi Guys,I'm a second year Biomedical Science student at the University of Portsmouth and in my spare time also work as an Ambassador for the Uni so have a pretty good experience of what it's like. I didn't live in halls in my first year so I can help with any housing enquires. However, being an Ambassador I have quite a good knowledge of all the halls, they're location and what they are like. So any questions, feel free to ask I also have a blog which i've just started. It will mainly be based around student life, what it was like being a fresher and being away from home, some of my life experiences and my travels around the world. It would be awesome if you wanted to follow the blog and comment, but that's up to you! And if any of you have any inspiration for future posts that would be great.Thank You!
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RegisteredBMS
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#23
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#23
(Original post by Paladin597)
Ok so I'm genuinely thinking of taking BSc Healthcare Science instead or Bsc Biomedical Science, any other tips or words of encouragement to why I'm better off doing HS than BMS?

Which University are you looking at? Make sure it's BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science). It's the Life Science aspect that is key, there are versions such as cardiology and audiology.

If you do the course, you have a 10 week rotation in a NHS laboratory around various disciplines to choose your desired area such as microbiology, biochemistry, histology etc. You choose a specialism during your 2nd year and then your final year modules are based around that. Between year 2 and 3 you do a 15 week placement in your chosen discipline and then during your final year you spend 4 days a week in the laboratory and one week in universities.

Although you choose specialist options in University, you graduate as a HCPC registered Biomedical Scientist who is qualified to work in ANY area. You also aren't limited to the NHS, you can still go down all the routes a standard Biomedical Science degree could take you.
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Paladin597
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#24
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I see

Currently I'm seeing Bradford University, MMU, Plymouth, UWE, Cardiff Met & UH for Bsc Healthcare Science


(Original post by TraineeBMS)
Which University are you looking at? Make sure it's BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science). It's the Life Science aspect that is key, there are versions such as cardiology and audiology.

If you do the course, you have a 10 week rotation in a NHS laboratory around various disciplines to choose your desired area such as microbiology, biochemistry, histology etc. You choose a specialism during your 2nd year and then your final year modules are based around that. Between year 2 and 3 you do a 15 week placement in your chosen discipline and then during your final year you spend 4 days a week in the laboratory and one week in universities.

Although you choose specialist options in University, you graduate as a HCPC registered Biomedical Scientist who is qualified to work in ANY area. You also aren't limited to the NHS, you can still go down all the routes a standard Biomedical Science degree could take you.
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RegisteredBMS
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#25
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(Original post by Paladin597)
I see

Currently I'm seeing Bradford University, MMU, Plymouth, UWE, Cardiff Met & UH for Bsc Healthcare Science
University of Bradford is very good for it. They were the first to run the course.
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plower
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#26
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Hey! I'm having a really confused moment as to what to do for my uni choices! I would like to do biomedical science and the ones i have looked at so far seem to be more into research i just realised, like Manchester and Sheffield ... my other three choices are Lincoln, Nottingham Trent and Coventry. I would like to have a more practical role in my future work as a biomedical scientist, and i don't think these choices are right. I might need to look more into them by going into open days and such but does anyone recommend a good uni that doesn't focus heavily on research if that makes sense? i dont know... Also on some courses it says 'Applied biomedical science' , is there any point in me taking them although there isn't a lot of uni's with it. And another thing is that some courses on their modules they learn haemotology and pathology and such but other uni courses hardly mentions it, should i not choose those uni that doesn't have it as I'm really interested in learning them or are they not giving enough info?... sorry this is so long winded and confusing maybe but please help me anyonee!!! deadline is soon eek
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RegisteredBMS
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#27
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#27
(Original post by plower)
Hey! I'm having a really confused moment as to what to do for my uni choices! I would like to do biomedical science and the ones i have looked at so far seem to be more into research i just realised, like Manchester and Sheffield ... my other three choices are Lincoln, Nottingham Trent and Coventry. I would like to have a more practical role in my future work as a biomedical scientist, and i don't think these choices are right. I might need to look more into them by going into open days and such but does anyone recommend a good uni that doesn't focus heavily on research if that makes sense? i dont know... Also on some courses it says 'Applied biomedical science' , is there any point in me taking them although there isn't a lot of uni's with it. And another thing is that some courses on their modules they learn haemotology and pathology and such but other uni courses hardly mentions it, should i not choose those uni that doesn't have it as I'm really interested in learning them or are they not giving enough info?... sorry this is so long winded and confusing maybe but please help me anyonee!!! deadline is soon eek
So you want to work in the NHS as a BMS?
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plower
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#28
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
So you want to work in the NHS as a BMS?
yuupp, that's what i've been searcing up on so far. Can you specialise to become a clinical pathologist during the final year? Also with my previous questions help please?
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RegisteredBMS
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#29
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If you want to be a BMS you need to do BSc Healthcare Science. It's as simple as that. You cab specialise post registration.
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Bagsworth
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#30
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(Original post by plower)
yuupp, that's what i've been searcing up on so far. Can you specialise to become a clinical pathologist during the final year? Also with my previous questions help please?
Hi, hopefully I can clear things up. To be a biomedical scientist in this country you need to a) study a BSc degree in Biomedical Science or Applied Biomedical Science (the former is usually better but the latter teaches you to become a biomedical scientist rather than gain a wide appreciation for science) b) the degree you choose must be accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (most degrees aren't actually accredited and Manchester almost certainly isn't, as you say, it's more about research) and c) you should try to find a degree 4 years long so you have a placement year in a pathology lab in one of the main biomed disciplines ( Biochem, Haematology, Immunology or Histology/Cytology). The last one I can't stress enough because I know a LOT of people who become lab assistants in the labs I work in so they can get insider knowledge for when trainee biomedical scientist jobs come up (this is the same role as your placement year where you will undertake the IBMS portfolio to prove your competency and right to register with the Health and Care Professions Council HCPC as a qualified BMS).

A Clinical Pathologist isn't a title as far as I'm aware but usually anyone who has pathologist in their job title is usually medically qualified and has a medical degree.

An alternative to being a biomedical scientist is undertaking any degree relevant to what you want your role to be in a career and applying for the clinical scientist training programme. This is a 3 year training programme with a masters degree in your specialism and when you finish you can register with the HCPC as a clinical scientist.

I did biomed as a degree with a placement year in clinical biochemistry, became a registered BMS, undertook a PhD and then got onto the scientist training programme where I am currently studying to become a clinical scientist / clinical biochemist. I hope that helps but feel free to message me if you need more advice!
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Bagsworth
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#31
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Also like TraineeBMS said you can do BSc Healthcare Science but I personally don't know too much about this apart from this is also called the Practitioner Training Programme (PTP) and is undergrad level and the clinical scientist training (which you can do after if you like) is the Scientist Training Programme (STP) and is postgraduate level. You can find out more at

https://www.nshcs.hee.nhs.uk/join-a-programme and universities

http://www.nshcs.hee.nhs.uk/ptp-join...sity-providers
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RegisteredBMS
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#32
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(Original post by Bagsworth)
Hi, hopefully I can clear things up. To be a biomedical scientist in this country you need to a) study a BSc degree in Biomedical Science or Applied Biomedical Science (the former is usually better but the latter teaches you to become a biomedical scientist rather than gain a wide appreciation for science) b) the degree you choose must be accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (most degrees aren't actually accredited and Manchester almost certainly isn't, as you say, it's more about research) and c) you should try to find a degree 4 years long so you have a placement year in a pathology lab in one of the main biomed disciplines ( Biochem, Haematology, Immunology or Histology/Cytology). The last one I can't stress enough because I know a LOT of people who become lab assistants in the labs I work in so they can get insider knowledge for when trainee biomedical scientist jobs come up (this is the same role as your placement year where you will undertake the IBMS portfolio to prove your competency and right to register with the Health and Care Professions Council HCPC as a qualified BMS).

A Clinical Pathologist isn't a title as far as I'm aware but usually anyone who has pathologist in their job title is usually medically qualified and has a medical degree.

An alternative to being a biomedical scientist is undertaking any degree relevant to what you want your role to be in a career and applying for the clinical scientist training programme. This is a 3 year training programme with a masters degree in your specialism and when you finish you can register with the HCPC as a clinical scientist.

I did biomed as a degree with a placement year in clinical biochemistry, became a registered BMS, undertook a PhD and then got onto the scientist training programme where I am currently studying to become a clinical scientist / clinical biochemist. I hope that helps but feel free to message me if you need more advice!
There's 0 requirement to do a 4 year degree. BSc Healthcarw Science incorporates the placement into a 3 year degree.
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Bagsworth
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#33
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#33
(Original post by TraineeBMS)
There's 0 requirement to do a 4 year degree. BSc Healthcarw Science incorporates the placement into a 3 year degree.
With respect, I did also say the PTP was also a valid pathway to becoming a registered BMS.
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plower
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#34
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thankyou you both so much for replying!! from what i've gathered i can either go to a university that's accredited or go to non-accredited one and do a SLT programme later after graduating but it seems doing a non-accredited course will take too long to get into the NHS.. and I think doing a PTP would narrow my choices down too much and if i don't like it then i'm pretty fcked. Actually i would like to do a sandwich course where i do a placement year and in Manchester it states "You undertake a research project, usually in an industrial or international research organisation. This provides a fantastic opportunity to undertake significant ‘real world’ research and decide whether a research career is for you." Tbh the thought of research just makes me cringe so i'm guessing it is not for me but would i be able to go to a clinical kind of place i wonder...need to go to that open day. is there actually any point in me going to a university where they don't focus a lot in practical in the placement year?

so Bagsworth
(Original post by Bagsworth)
I did biomed as a degree with a placement year in clinical biochemistry, became a registered BMS, undertook a PhD and then got onto the scientist training programme where I am currently studying to become a clinical scientist / clinical biochemist. I hope that helps but feel free to message me if you need more advice!
may i ask which uni you went to? Also do you get paid while doing the SLT programme and are you doing a part-time masters with it cos it said in the website..? did you generally enjoy the course as whole?
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RegisteredBMS
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#35
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#35
(Original post by plower)
thankyou you both so much for replying!! from what i've gathered i can either go to a university that's accredited or go to non-accredited one and do a SLT programme later after graduating but it seems doing a non-accredited course will take too long to get into the NHS.. and I think doing a PTP would narrow my choices down too much and if i don't like it then i'm pretty fcked. Actually i would like to do a sandwich course where i do a placement year and in Manchester it states "You undertake a research project, usually in an industrial or international research organisation. This provides a fantastic opportunity to undertake significant ‘real world’ research and decide whether a research career is for you." Tbh the thought of research just makes me cringe so i'm guessing it is not for me but would i be able to go to a clinical kind of place i wonder...need to go to that open day. is there actually any point in me going to a university where they don't focus a lot in practical in the placement year?

so Bagsworth may i ask which uni you went to? Also do you get paid while doing the SLT programme and are you doing a part-time masters with it cos it said in the website..? did you generally enjoy the course as whole?
Doing the PTP doesn't restrict you to the NHS. It's a common misconception.
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plower
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#36
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Also if I do an accredited course, will I still have to do the SLT programme to be able to do clinical things or is it not needed and I can just apply for work?
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plower
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#37
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
Doing the PTP doesn't restrict you to the NHS. It's a common misconception.
No I didn't meant that, I meant more like the area is a lot more focused on one topic and it would be a problem if I didn't like it cos there's not other choices.. if you get what I mean. Anyway are you a biomedical scientist too? If so, what is your current role if you don't mind me asking
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RegisteredBMS
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#38
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(Original post by plower)
No I didn't meant that, I meant more like the area is a lot more focused on one topic and it would be a problem if I didn't like it cos there's not other choices.. if you get what I mean. Anyway are you a biomedical scientist too? If so, what is your current role if you don't mind me asking
I have specialised in Microbiology.

The PTP does allow you to choose an option from the four below:
Infection Science
Blood Science
Cellular Science
Genetics

However, you will still graduate as a registered Biomedical Scientist and although you will have specialist knowledge in the area you specialsied in, you are actually still qualified to work in any area as a Band 5. Once you complete your 'Specialist Portfolio' you are then committed to that path as a Band 6 Specialist Biomedical Scientist and if you wanted to move to another discipline then you would have to as a Band 5.

Committing to a discipline is something to worry about further down the line, if you work out you really like something and choose it as an option on your course, that is great though but a benefit. You do your Specialist Portfolio after at least a year of experience as a BMS, and it is not mandatory.
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plower
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#39
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
I have specialised in Microbiology.

The PTP does allow you to choose an option from the four below:
Infection Science
Blood Science
Cellular Science
Genetics

However, you will still graduate as a registered Biomedical Scientist and although you will have specialist knowledge in the area you specialsied in, you are actually still qualified to work in any area as a Band 5. Once you complete your 'Specialist Portfolio' you are then committed to that path as a Band 6 Specialist Biomedical Scientist and if you wanted to move to another discipline then you would have to as a Band 5.

Committing to a discipline is something to worry about further down the line, if you work out you really like something and choose it as an option on your course, that is great though but a benefit. You do your Specialist Portfolio after at least a year of experience as a BMS, and it is not mandatory.
is this similar doing a biomedical science course? tbh what is actually the main difference between biomedical and healthcare science...
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RegisteredBMS
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#40
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(Original post by plower)
is this similar doing a biomedical science course? tbh what is actually the main difference between biomedical and healthcare science...
The main difference is the placements that are involved in NHS labs.
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