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    Hi.
    First of all, I really couldn't decide on whether I should do Law or Economics at undergraduate level, as I really loved both, but at the end I have decided to choose law. Now, however, I am on the brink of sending my application to several Law schools and I am having a second thought about economics, that just kills me. This uncertainty makes me want to skip applying at all.

    Please help, I really don't know what do do now?
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    Do law at a really top ranked uni like really high ranked or don't do it at all
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    (Original post by blessed107)
    Do law at a really top ranked uni like really high ranked or don't do it at all
    What do you perceive as a top ranked uni? I am not applying to Oxbridge, but all my choices are RGs.
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    Hi.
    First of all, I really couldn't decide on whether I should do Law or Economics at undergraduate level, as I really loved both, but at the end I have decided to choose law. Now, however, I am on the brink of sending my application to several Law schools and I am having a second thought about economics, that just kills me. This uncertainty makes me want to skip applying at all.

    Please help, I really don't know what do do now?
    Don't go until you do know which one you want. There is no law which says you have to go straight from school and many, many people don't. You'll be wasting money, time and happiness if you choose the wrong thing. Take a year out and clear your head.
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    You've got until January to decide so in your position I'd wait until nearer to the deadline and carry out some work experience in both sectors to help decide what you're more interested in.
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    (Original post by preetg97)
    You've got until January to decide so in your position I'd wait until nearer to the deadline and carry out some work experience in both sectors to help decide what you're more interested in.
    The problem is that I am really interested in both sectors, I have extra curriculars for both of them and I am currently doing a pre-university course in economics. Economics, generally seems like a better option due to better starting salaries, employability due to the numerical nature of the subject and overall is an easy option, as there is no need in qualifying after university as there is for a career in law (LPC, PSC). But law still attracts me for some reason, visiting courts and dealing with serious matters just feels right. There is also something great about working with finance in the city and getting paid a decent salary as well.

    Thanks for advice.
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    The problem is that I am really interested in both sectors, I have extra curriculars for both of them and I am currently doing a pre-university course in economics. Economics, generally seems like a better option due to better starting salaries, employability due to the numerical nature of the subject and overall is an easy option, as there is no need in qualifying after university as there is for a career in law (LPC, PSC). But law still attracts me for some reason, visiting courts and dealing with serious matters just feels right. There is also something great about working with finance in the city and getting paid a decent salary as well.

    Thanks for advice.
    I know the situation you're in, trust me! I've dropped out of university and I'm taking a year out because I figured that dentistry would be more interesting than my original course - so I've been doing work experience and working in a dentists for a few weeks.

    Just don't stress yourself about needing to decide just yet, because if worst comes to worse you can always try out one course then take a gap year and re-apply to the other.

    Good luck.
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    (Original post by preetg97)
    I know the situation you're in, trust me! I've dropped out of university and I'm taking a year out because I figured that dentistry would be more interesting than my original course - so I've been doing work experience and working in a dentists for a few weeks.

    Just don't stress yourself about needing to decide just yet, because if worst comes to worse you can always try out one course then take a gap year and re-apply to the other.

    Good luck.
    Thank you, that reassured me a bit. I should be in the better position closer to the deadline, as by that time I would attend more economics pre-uni lectures and it would be easier to make my mind up. Did you pick medicine firstly?
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    Do economics then if you still want to do law in three years you can do a one year conversion course.
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    Thank you, that reassured me a bit. I should be in the better position closer to the deadline, as by that time I would attend more economics pre-uni lectures and it would be easier to make my mind up. Did you pick medicine firstly?
    Nope, Optometry. Only decided to go because I figured it was the east option, but that is no reason to do it when my heart wasn't in it haha
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    I'm now a lawyer working in the financial services sector.

    Do Economics, because

    1. You should not do law if you have doubts. There are lots of people out there dead set on becoming lawyers. If you're not sure about law you probably won't cut it.

    2. A lawyer with a degree in economics is far more useful than an economist with a law degree, because

    3. Economics is a more versatile subject when it comes to career choices, and

    4. Economics is more likely to give you an international career - law doesn't travel well as a job qualification.
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    I stuggled with the same decision - wanted to do law all the way through year 12, then decided on economics and I don't regret it at all. My reasons aren't disimlar to those above, but ultimately, it was because the transferable numeracy skills and greater interest in the subject combined with reason 2 from the above poster convinced me that fewer doors are shut with an economics degree, and that the GDL would simply teach me what I need to know anyway.

    Don't take law because you want to be a lawyer, pick it because you find the academic material more stimulating than econ.
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    (Original post by Exceptional)
    I stuggled with the same decision - wanted to do law all the way through year 12, then decided on economics and I don't regret it at all. My reasons aren't disimlar to those above, but ultimately, it was because the transferable numeracy skills and greater interest in the subject combined with reason 2 from the above poster convinced me that fewer doors are shut with an economics degree, and that the GDL would simply teach me what I need to know anyway.

    Don't take law because you want to be a lawyer, pick it because you find the academic material more stimulating than econ.
    Well, I find law just marginally more stimulating. I've been set for law since high school, but low average graduate salaries and difficulties in qualifying made me have some doubts. Whilst economics seems like a better option in terms of money, as less will be spent on training and more will be earned on the job. Also, I can get into Manchester Uni with just ABB due to pre-uni course I am doing right now.
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    (Original post by Stychomythia)
    I'm now a lawyer working in the financial services sector.

    Do Economics, because

    1. You should not do law if you have doubts. There are lots of people out there dead set on becoming lawyers. If you're not sure about law you probably won't cut it.

    2. A lawyer with a degree in economics is far more useful than an economist with a law degree, because

    3. Economics is a more versatile subject when it comes to career choices, and

    4. Economics is more likely to give you an international career - law doesn't travel well as a job qualification.
    Which university have you graduated from, if you don't mind me asking?
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    (Original post by Stychomythia)
    I'm now a lawyer working in the financial services sector.

    Do Economics, because

    1. You should not do law if you have doubts. There are lots of people out there dead set on becoming lawyers. If you're not sure about law you probably won't cut it.

    2. A lawyer with a degree in economics is far more useful than an economist with a law degree, because

    3. Economics is a more versatile subject when it comes to career choices, and

    4. Economics is more likely to give you an international career - law doesn't travel well as a job qualification.
    i want a career in the financial sector as well. im not gonna start uni until im 21/22 due academic problems i want to study business management and then get into the sector is this the best way to go?
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    The problem is that I am really interested in both sectors, I have extra curriculars for both of them and I am currently doing a pre-university course in economics. Economics, generally seems like a better option due to better starting salaries, employability due to the numerical nature of the subject and overall is an easy option, as there is no need in qualifying after university as there is for a career in law (LPC, PSC). But law still attracts me for some reason, visiting courts and dealing with serious matters just feels right. There is also something great about working with finance in the city and getting paid a decent salary as well.

    Thanks for advice.
    Just as a point, there aren't many jobs an economics degree holder could get that a law degree holder couldn't, and vice versa. The higher average starting salaries is due to the fact that most people heading into Econ degrees are career focused, albeit the same goes for Law, but they start their careers immediately after university. An average starting salary after 1 year would give you a better indication for law as I'd imagine most would have started their training contracts by then.

    Likewise with an Econ degree you can become a lawyer. As long as you secure a training contract before uni finishes, you could potentially get your GDL and LPC paid for.

    Main thing is the salary you get is a function of the company/role you aim for, don't take it into account that much.
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    (Original post by Stychomythia)
    I'm now a lawyer working in the financial services sector.

    Do Economics, because

    1. You should not do law if you have doubts. There are lots of people out there dead set on becoming lawyers. If you're not sure about law you probably won't cut it.

    2. A lawyer with a degree in economics is far more useful than an economist with a law degree, because

    3. Economics is a more versatile subject when it comes to career choices, and

    4. Economics is more likely to give you an international career - law doesn't travel well as a job qualification.
    Point 4 is BS. When I was at a large Magic Circle firm, a good 40-50% of the trainees spent time in HK, Paris, New York, Dubai and a bunch of other international cities. Some even did secondments at a different companies abroad. That said, I agree to an extent, for most non-commonwealth countries practising law can be quite challenging. Basicalky, aim for the large international companies and you'll be able to get opportunities to work abroad.

    Plus any jobs an econ grad applies for a law grad can get, with the exception of if said econ grad chooses to pursue a PhD in Econ then becomes a fully fledged economist.
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    (Original post by fasial96.)
    i want a career in the financial sector as well. im not gonna start uni until im 21/22 due academic problems i want to study business management and then get into the sector is this the best way to go?
    If you like business management, I guess.. It's not as respected as a traditional academic subject, but it's more about the university you go to anyway.

    Aim for the targets (Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, Warwick, Imperial) and semis (Nottingham, Bristol, Durham, Edinburgh, KCL, Cass etc) if you want a decent shot at a revenue generating role in IB.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Just as a point, there aren't many jobs an economics degree holder could get that a law degree holder couldn't, and vice versa. The higher average starting salaries is due to the fact that most people heading into Econ degrees are career focused, albeit the same goes for Law, but they start their careers immediately after university. An average starting salary after 1 year would give you a better indication for law as I'd imagine most would have started their training contracts by then.

    Likewise with an Econ degree you can become a lawyer. As long as you secure a training contract before uni finishes, you could potentially get your GDL and LPC paid for.

    Main thing is the salary you get is a function of the company/role you aim for, don't take it into account that much.
    I checked Unistats and average salaries after 40 months after graduation are: for law grads- 21k and for econ grads- 29k. Also, top of the range salaries for econ graduates were insanely huge in comparison to law grads. (that is just for the Uni of Manchester)
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    I checked Unistats and average salaries after 40 months after graduation are: for law grads- 21k and for econ grads- 29k. Also, top of the range salaries for econ graduates were insanely huge in comparison to law grads. (that is just for the Uni of Manchester)
    Did you miss the bit about your salary is dependant on the company/role you aim for?!?! Your degree (especially as both of these are not professional degrees) does not equate to a salary...

    Just choose a degree that you'd prefer doing then research the careers/companies you want to aim for.

    Unistats is probably the worst reference point for it (small sample sizes of 30-60 people), go on glassdoor to see what graduates are making in the jobs/companies you would want to work for instead.

    I can tell you right now, a trainee at the firm I was at for an internship earns about £41k when they start - so again, just don't equate your degree to a salary.
 
 
 
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