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    Can someone explain their understanding of it regardless if it mentions electrons etc.?

    The teacher explained it like light hitting a photosystem, and drew a line bouncing down a cone to the reaction centre, bouncing off different pigments etc.

    How can pigments absorb light and have an optimum wavelength, when it is the electrons in the pigments which do, consequently becoming excited?

    i.e. how can electrons have optimum wavelengths to absorb, or is that caused by other factors? Nothing's hinted that.

    Also it's the (electrons) that are directed down to the reaction centre to chlorophyll B. I'm presuming it's just down to the reaction centre where there is chlorophyll B, where an enzyme uses the light in the liberation of oxygen (in the photolysis of water.)

    All the nuances are really confusing me from the lack of depth the booklets seem to have and the time gone into explaining it (and that it's a difficult topic to teach, mainly.) When the teacher says you must do further research for top grades in the synoptic essays, I now have, and there's so much more which conflicts.
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    Most of that is probably wrong.

    Edit: I just watched a youtube video which explained it well; electrons isn't relevant at that part.

    The energy is transferred by something called resonance energy transfer.
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    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    (...)
    i.e. how can electrons have optimum wavelengths to absorb, or is that caused by other factors? Nothing's hinted that.(...)
    As far as I know the pigments need this 'optimum wave lengths' to set electrons from chlorophyll free. From the view of photons, that is to say they need a certain amount of energy, otherwise the electrons cannot be freed from chlorophyll. This amount of energy is close to the blue spectrum in the one hand and close to the red one in the other hand. These electrons are needed for electron transport chain to finish the photosystem off. So the electrons as you said are not relevant for the absorption of light.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    As far as I know the pigments need this 'optimum wave lengths' to set electrons from chlorophyll free. From the view of photons, that is to say they need a certain amount of energy, otherwise the electrons cannot be freed from chlorophyll. This amount of energy is close to the blue spectrum in the one hand and close to the red one in the other hand. These electrons are needed for electron transport chain to finish the photosystem off. So the electrons as you said are not relevant for the absorption of light.
    From further research, I found out that the pigments absorb the photons of light, their energy, and pass the energy down through something called resonance energy transfer, to the reaction centre (not sure its exact relationship with chlorophyll a though), where it turns 2H2O into 4H+ 4e- and O2, in the photolysis of water. The energy also excites an electron for that other part.

    What majorly confused me at the start was the "how??", but that further bit of research paid off. I don't think my understanding is still entirely correct, but it's better than it was before.

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    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    From further research, I found out that the pigments absorb the photons of light, their energy, and pass the energy down through something called resonance energy transfer, to the reaction centre (not sure its exact relationship with chlorophyll a though), where it turns 2H2O into 4H+ 4e- and O2, in the photolysis of water. The energy also excites an electron for that other part.(...)
    Your statement is a bit incorrect. If you say that 'the pigments absorb the photons of light' that is just true in part. They just absorb certain photons of lights with certain amounts of energy, as if they are specialized for them. The rest of it is just reflected.
 
 
 
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