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    I got a 55% for 1st year - including two resits and always include the content from lectures in my exam work, I go through past papers and answer all the questions ..

    I did notice in one of my resists where I originally got 24% despite doing the above (lol), when I went beyond the lecture notes and did wider reading I got 65%

    So is it just that, using the lecture notes is enough for a 40% but to go above this I need to do wider reading? But the difficulty with this is that in science there's only one answer, so what would the wider reading involve ?
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    (Original post by diggy)
    I got a 55% for 1st year - including two resits and always include the content from lectures in my exam work, I go through past papers and answer all the questions ..

    I did notice in one of my resists where I originally got 24% despite doing the above (lol), when I went beyond the lecture notes and did wider reading I got 65%

    So is it just that, using the lecture notes is enough for a 40% but to go above this I need to do wider reading? But the difficulty with this is that in science there's only one answer, so what would the wider reading involve ?
    In science wider reading beyond the lecture material shouldn't be necessary to achieve a good classification.

    Do you actually understand the material and are you able to answer the past paper questions well?
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    (Original post by Sammydemon)
    In science wider reading beyond the lecture material shouldn't be necessary to achieve a good classification.

    Do you actually understand the material and are you able to answer the past paper questions well?
    Yeah, the questions are repeated in exams so I answered them all - making sure to understand the answers - then did the exams

    I know thats what I thought too

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    (Original post by diggy)
    Yeah, the questions are repeated in exams so I answered them all - making sure to understand the answers - then did the exams

    I know thats what I thought too

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    Maybe speak to your tutor or lecturer and ask for some advice becuase you appear to be doing all the right things.

    I stuck to this formula for my chemistry degree and got a 2.1 in the end.
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    Bumo

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    Wider reading isn't necessary, I did virtually none and graduated with a 1st class honours chemistry BSc. I don't know if this works for everyone but what I did was read the notes and then do loads of past exam papers.
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    (Original post by diggy)
    I got a 55% for 1st year - including two resits and always include the content from lectures in my exam work, I go through past papers and answer all the questions ..

    I did notice in one of my resists where I originally got 24% despite doing the above (lol), when I went beyond the lecture notes and did wider reading I got 65%

    So is it just that, using the lecture notes is enough for a 40% but to go above this I need to do wider reading? But the difficulty with this is that in science there's only one answer, so what would the wider reading involve ?
    We were told that if we wanted to scrape a pass, we could regurgitate what we were told in lectures. If we wanted a good mark, we had to study independently and do more reading.

    Whilst there may be only one answer for some science questions, sometimes there are different ways of reaching it. Sometimes the answer is disputed. Sometimes it's being expanded upon. Scientific research rarely stands alone - it's generally part of a research field or dialogue. It should "fit in" somewhere. There should be plenty of reading around the wider field.

    I'd suggest finding a "one answer" question and booking some office time with the relevant member of staff. Give them an idea of how you'd go about answering it, then get them to explain what they would expect to see in an improved and expanded answer, and suggest ways you might go about achieving that. Most staff will try to find time for a student who is keen to improve.

    Plus you'll need a job reference from someone at the uni once you finish your course. If you can establish yourself in their minds as an individual and not just one of the herd, that will help get you a better quality individual reference, rather than a generic one just written from your student records.
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    What exact subject are you studying? For biochem we needed to do extra reading in some modules to get a first overall but most of the time, when you covered the lecture material in enough detail a 2.1 grade was perfectly achievable.

    Perhaps you need to work on exam technique and solidify your understanding of topics?
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    We were told that if we wanted to scrape a pass, we could regurgitate what we were told in lectures. If we wanted a good mark, we had to study independently and do more reading.

    Whilst there may be only one answer for some science questions, sometimes there are different ways of reaching it. Sometimes the answer is disputed. Sometimes it's being expanded upon. Scientific research rarely stands alone - it's generally part of a research field or dialogue. It should "fit in" somewhere. There should be plenty of reading around the wider field.

    I'd suggest finding a "one answer" question and booking some office time with the relevant member of staff. Give them an idea of how you'd go about answering it, then get them to explain what they would expect to see in an improved and expanded answer, and suggest ways you might go about achieving that. Most staff will try to find time for a student who is keen to improve.

    Plus you'll need a job reference from someone at the uni once you finish your course. If you can establish yourself in their minds as an individual and not just one of the herd, that will help get you a better quality individual reference, rather than a generic one just written from your student records.
    Yeah I agree with you, I've been regurgitating the work getting me mostly getting me 40s in exams, with the highest being 48%

    I also feel as if my answers have been containing the bare bones, so I'm going to pad out my exam answers fully explaining how I got that answer, they including relevant links to any wider reading I can find

    thanks
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    (Original post by frozen_fire)
    What exact subject are you studying? For biochem we needed to do extra reading in some modules to get a first overall but most of the time, when you covered the lecture material in enough detail a 2.1 grade was perfectly achievable.

    Perhaps you need to work on exam technique and solidify your understanding of topics?
    Agriculture, Klix got it spot on at my uni covering just the lecture work will get a 40%
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    (Original post by diggy)
    Agriculture, Klix got it spot on at my uni covering just the lecture work will get a 40%
    I find it hard to believe the content covered in your lectures is so sparse that you can only scrape 40%. To only be getting in the 40s in uni exams, there must be something else going wrong because those are very poor marks. Do they recommend specific wider reading? Have you asked other people on your course with better grades what their approach is to revision?
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    Go to all the lectures and tutorials. Re-write your notes after the lecture. Do the reading.
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    As long as you go to all the lectures and understand all the content, and of course remember it for the exam, then you should be able to pass - however depending on your university/ exam structure they may expect a lot more from you to get a good grade.

    If you 100% understand everything in lectures and think you are remembering it all in exams, then yes, your university probably does expect you to do extra reading. For example, you could read the papers with the evidence for the theories you are learning about - so in the exam you can describe the evidence behind all the things you are saying. I have heard of some students on my course learning references (or at least the name of the person who discovered each thing) to make sure they can really point out in an exam where they have done extra reading.

    It may also be a bit of an exam technique thing - for example, maybe you are just quoting equations and using them, but the examiner wants you to show some of the derivation behind the equation to show that you are not just blindly memorising equations and actually understand them.

    If you have to write essays, it's surprising just how important your essay writing skills are for a science exam - make sure you are always focusing on the question, clearly state your points with evidence, have a simple introduction - body - conclusion structure, and nicely summarise your argument at the end. Diagrams can also be a really great way of illustrating things - plus they take up lots of space which gives the impression to the examiner that you have written a lot = know a lot (yeah, I know they're not officially marking you on this, but I definitely did better in my essays when I made them longer with big diagrams - although it could just be that big diagrams are a really good and clear way of getting across a point).

    I notice you say that in science there is only one right answer - in fact this is generally not the case at degree level, there are often conflicting evidence / different theories / several factors to consider. Even if your lecturer has clearly favoured a particular theory or you are sure that one factor is dominant in a particular reaction (I'm thinking of Chemistry here btw - where sometimes you have to think of several opposing factors which affect the outcome of a reaction) then it is good to mention the opposing point of view, even if it's just to discount it (with an explanation).
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    (Original post by frozen_fire)
    I find it hard to believe the content covered in your lectures is so sparse that you can only scrape 40%. To only be getting in the 40s in uni exams, there must be something else going wrong because those are very poor marks. Do they recommend specific wider reading? Have you asked other people on your course with better grades what their approach is to revision?
    Yeah I know, I've been getting good grades in coursework though

    Yeah they specify WR, I probably need to actually read it and yeah I'll ask my friends how they went about their revision
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    (Original post by diggy)
    Yeah I know, I've been getting good grades in coursework though

    Yeah they specify WR, I probably need to actually read it and yeah I'll ask my friends how they went about their revision
    Fair enough yeah it's a good idea to identify ways to improve at this stage when stuff actually starts to count.
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    Cheeky bump

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