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    Hi everyone,

    I was first diagnosed with depression at the end of the last summer term just gone. I had a terrible summer because of my illness, but with the help of anti-depressants started to feel a bit normal again within a couple of months. Since coming back to uni though things have turned worse again. Many of my symptoms have returned, e.g. low mood, lack of concentration/motivation, generally finding very little interest in anything I do, thoughts of suicide as well as feeling very disconnected from my body and everything around me.

    I'm in my third and final year now, meaning everything is so much more important and I really cannot afford for my depression to get the better of me this academic year. I am struggling at the moment now, and feel I should let my tutor know about the situation just so if there are any problems in the future she already knows about it. The only thing is I have seen her probably around four times throughout my three years here, and can't help feeling it's going to be very awkward trying to explain to her what's been going on, particularly as I'm not used to talking to anyone about it, as my home doctor and university GP are the only two people that know.

    So to avoid the awkward situation would it be acceptable to send her an email with what I want to say or will this seem a bit strange? Or if it would be better to go and talk to my tutor in person how should I broach the subject? What could I say? I understand my question sounds quite trivial but I've been really worrying about it lately, particularly as I know there is still this stigma attached to mental health issues and expression of them.

    If anyone else has any experience of anything relating to this I would really appreciate the insight
    Thank you so much
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    You could go to your uni's Student Support department, explain to them and ask them to let your tutor know? They see students in all sorts of difficulties and will agree what to say on your behalf.
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    (Original post by Char321)
    Hi everyone,

    I was first diagnosed with depression at the end of the last summer term just gone. I had a terrible summer because of my illness, but with the help of anti-depressants started to feel a bit normal again within a couple of months. Since coming back to uni though things have turned worse again. Many of my symptoms have returned, e.g. low mood, lack of concentration/motivation, generally finding very little interest in anything I do, thoughts of suicide as well as feeling very disconnected from my body and everything around me.

    I'm in my third and final year now, meaning everything is so much more important and I really cannot afford for my depression to get the better of me this academic year. I am struggling at the moment now, and feel I should let my tutor know about the situation just so if there are any problems in the future she already knows about it. The only thing is I have seen her probably around four times throughout my three years here, and can't help feeling it's going to be very awkward trying to explain to her what's been going on, particularly as I'm not used to talking to anyone about it, as my home doctor and university GP are the only two people that know.

    So to avoid the awkward situation would it be acceptable to send her an email with what I want to say or will this seem a bit strange? Or if it would be better to go and talk to my tutor in person how should I broach the subject? What could I say? I understand my question sounds quite trivial but I've been really worrying about it lately, particularly as I know there is still this stigma attached to mental health issues and expression of them.

    If anyone else has any experience of anything relating to this I would really appreciate the insight
    Thank you so much
    If you tell the university you could possibly get extenuating circumstances.
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    (Original post by Char321)
    Hi everyone,

    I was first diagnosed with depression at the end of the last summer term just gone. I had a terrible summer because of my illness, but with the help of anti-depressants started to feel a bit normal again within a couple of months. Since coming back to uni though things have turned worse again. Many of my symptoms have returned, e.g. low mood, lack of concentration/motivation, generally finding very little interest in anything I do, thoughts of suicide as well as feeling very disconnected from my body and everything around me.

    I'm in my third and final year now, meaning everything is so much more important and I really cannot afford for my depression to get the better of me this academic year. I am struggling at the moment now, and feel I should let my tutor know about the situation just so if there are any problems in the future she already knows about it. The only thing is I have seen her probably around four times throughout my three years here, and can't help feeling it's going to be very awkward trying to explain to her what's been going on, particularly as I'm not used to talking to anyone about it, as my home doctor and university GP are the only two people that know.

    So to avoid the awkward situation would it be acceptable to send her an email with what I want to say or will this seem a bit strange? Or if it would be better to go and talk to my tutor in person how should I broach the subject? What could I say? I understand my question sounds quite trivial but I've been really worrying about it lately, particularly as I know there is still this stigma attached to mental health issues and expression of them.

    If anyone else has any experience of anything relating to this I would really appreciate the insight
    Thank you so much
    Okay realistically your tutor is there to listen to your talk about personal stuff like that, even if you have only seen her 4 times over 2 year (most tutors are lecturers/researchers as you probably know, and are so busy that they are unlikely to contact you first to ask how things are). If you feel awkward arranging a meeting or going to her office to talk, or just don't know how to say 'I'm depressed', contact your disability support officer. At my uni, they took my details and passed them on to everyone relevant (tutor, head of school etc) and that also made it possible for me to be in a separate room for my exams, and also have extended deadlines if I felt I was struggling.

    Always remember that there are always other people in your year/course that are struggling with potentially the same or similar problems and the university and your tutor are trained to deal with situations like yours.

    Hope all goes well!
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    If you'd feel more comfortable with an email then you can do that, your tutor probably want to see you anyway. They will be concerned to know if you are getting medical help with this and if not they should suggest sources of help.

    However you talk to them it is important that there is a record that you did so, either an email before or one afterwards. I know someone repeating a year at university, something that would have been easier to arrange had his depression been notified to the university sooner.

    You aren't alone and the important things are that the university is notified and that you receive help to deal with this.
 
 
 
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