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    HI I am in my third year of Biomedicine. I hope to finish with a 2:1 which is what I achieved in my 2nd year.

    I got BBB at A - Level in chemistry Biology and history I didn't do a AS level though.

    GCSE's 6 A's 6A*'s and one C (in IT)

    I have had some work experience in a hospital a doctors surgery and with an on call doctor.

    I wanted to know do I stand a chance of doing Postgraduate medicine at a London university.

    Kings college

    Imperial

    St george's

    Barts

    I think these are the four that offer it. Are my A level grades a problem?

    Would I benefit from doing say a year in research after my degree and then apply the following year?

    I'd love some help and advice.



    Thanks
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    (Original post by jonathanf-s)
    HI I am in my third year of Biomedicine. I hope to finish with a 2:1 which is what I achieved in my 2nd year.

    I got BBB at A - Level in chemistry Biology and history I didn't do a AS level though.

    GCSE's 6 A's 6A*'s and one C (in IT)

    I have had some work experience in a hospital a doctors surgery and with an on call doctor.

    I wanted to know do I stand a chance of doing Postgraduate medicine at a London university.

    Kings college

    Imperial

    St george's

    Barts

    I think these are the four that offer it. Are my A level grades a problem?

    Would I benefit from doing say a year in research after my degree and then apply the following year?

    I'd love some help and advice.



    Thanks
    hate to break it to you but you are already too late for 2016 entry. You need to sit the UKCAT (and score 700+ average) and the GAMSAT (average over ~65) for those uni's. A-levels tend not too mean much for most GEP but check the entry requirements.

    Also good luck getting a year of research holding only an undergrad! You'd be much better off doing a year as a HCA (crap pay but much more relevant) or doing a 1 year masters.
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    (Original post by neuronerd)
    hate to break it to you but you are already too late for 2016 entry. You need to sit the UKCAT (and score 700+ average) and the GAMSAT (average over ~65) for those uni's. A-levels tend not too mean much for most GEP but check the entry requirements.

    Also good luck getting a year of research holding only an undergrad! You'd be much better off doing a year as a HCA (crap pay but much more relevant) or doing a 1 year masters.
    I wasn't planning on applying for 2016 entry but for 2017. I was hoping to use the year out to either continue working on the cancer research project that I'm on at the moment or to do a masters. I was also hoping to continue doing shadowing of health care proffesionals etc.
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    (Original post by jonathanf-s)
    I wasn't planning on applying for 2016 entry but for 2017. I was hoping to use the year out to either continue working on the cancer research project that I'm on at the moment or to do a masters. I was also hoping to continue doing shadowing of health care proffesionals etc.
    Be careful with doing a Masters, a lot of the GEM courses start early and they won't accept applications from you if your Masters doesn't finish in time.

    If graduate entry medicine (its still technically an undergrad degree, not postgrad) is what you want to do, then the other user is right. Get a job as an HCA or similar, the experience looks great and its good for you to see what healthcare is like right on the frontlines.
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    How do you find out when and if a masters finishes in time and what sort of masters is worth doing I was thinking of doing cancer Biology.
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    Masters courses are usually 12 calendar months long (often October - October), though I don't know if medical courses are any different.
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    (Original post by jonathanf-s)
    How do you find out when and if a masters finishes in time and what sort of masters is worth doing I was thinking of doing cancer Biology.
    To be honest, if you're doing one simply to apply to medicine, it's not worth it. Very few gem courses credit it during application.

    If you're doing it because you want to do a masters, then pick what you actually have an interest in.

    When you're applying I assume they'll give you an indication of start and end date. But a lot of gem course start early September, so you'll have to be careful.

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    Okay thanks how important is getting a job as a health care assistant? and is there other things that particularly stand out Im part of medsin at my uni and I do volunteer work through them ? I am also hoping to work in a childrens home part time but is that particularly useful or not ?

    thanks
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    And do I have any realistic chances because my a levels aren't great and I keep seeing people saying they have 600+ ucas points
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    how important is getting a job as a health care assistant? and is there other things that particularly stand out Im part of medsin at my uni and I do volunteer work through them ? I am also hoping to work in a childrens home part time but is that particularly useful or not ?
    are UCAS POINTS IMPORTANT NOW I'M APPLYING AS A POST GRAD
    thanks

    Jon
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    (Original post by jonathanf-s)
    how important is getting a job as a health care assistant? and is there other things that particularly stand out Im part of medsin at my uni and I do volunteer work through them ? I am also hoping to work in a childrens home part time but is that particularly useful or not ?
    are UCAS POINTS IMPORTANT NOW I'M APPLYING AS A POST GRAD
    thanks

    Jon
    UCAS tariffs are never important for medicine (except for Barts) and definitely don't count for anything for GEM.

    Being an HCA is an awesome way of gaining experience, but its not the only way. Nor is it a requirement. Those volunteering roles sound great but you also need some work experience ideally.

    And to be pedantic.. its graduate entry medicine. Not postgraduate! There is a big difference. You will still be studying undergraduate level medicine.
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    Not sure it's been mentioned, but your London only criteria will limit you severely.
    You will be wanting top marks in both GAMSAT and UKCAT. Sit the GAMSAT Ireland in March so you have results in hand and then reassess after doing the UKCAT.

    Imperial does not run a 4 year GEM course. It's 5 years and as such you do not receive any funding from student finance other than the maintenance loan. At £9,000pa tuition fees and London living costs, your finances had best be in order.

    Finally, it is graduate entry medicine and not postgraduate medicine. Postgraduate medicine is what you do once you've obtained a primary medical qualification.

    Stop with the capitals, it's annoying. Use italics or bold to emphasise a point.


    Edit: year in primary research isn't going to make the biggest difference. But if you can get clinical research exposure and use that to build networks, gain experience in clinical settings then yes.
    Don't bother with a masters unless you really are rolling in the money. Only two universities rate an MSc in comparison to a BSc, though a few others do as well that only becomes relevant if you have a lower second class degree. Most will require you to submit degree certificates by August, most MSc courses will not complete until Sept earliest.
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    I'm in a similar position (2.1 science degree, not embarrassing but not amazing A levels), although I graduated three years ago and have been working for a science magazine since.

    Looking at London-only unis you've got Bart's, St George's, and King's - Imperial stopped their four year course and UCL don't offer it. So you've got at least one non-London option.

    St George's require the GAMSAT, which is a horrific five hour university-level exam in biology, chemistry, physics, and critical analysis. UKCAT is much more straightforward, but only relevant when applying to King's and Bart's.

    Without stellar A level results, your application will really live or die by your entrance exam results and work experience/personal statement. I suggest you spend some time looking at the UKCAT, BMAT, and GAMSAT, and think about which would suit your strengths.

    GAMSAT will require months of dedicated study, and unless you do it in Ireland in March, you won't know your results until after you apply in 2016. However, GAMSAT unis tend to have fewer applicants (they are intimidated by the exam!), so are a bit less competitive. BMAT is a bit less scary, but you only sit the exam after the UCAS deadline so you could have a bad test day and ruin your chances. UKCAT is easier although it requires a lot of concentrated effort in the weeks leading up to the test, but at least you get the results on the day.

    Once you've picked your entrance exam strategy, you need to make your work experience watertight. You'll need sustained (months or years) paid or voluntary experience in a care setting (eg, befriender, hospice volunteer, healthcare assistant, first aider). You'll also need work experience in a hospital or GP practice, at least a week although two weeks is ideal.

    While you're still at uni, it's worth cultivating a tutor or lecturer so you know they'll remember you when it comes to refereeing time!

    But if you spend the next year wisely, you'll be in a great position next October.
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    Just a heads up with the GAMSAT, it's not insanely hard for science grads. I did 3 months revision whilst working full time and came out in the top 1%. Also you can sit the GAMSAT in London in March (it costs extra). Bonus is that you have your results in May so know what to plan for, and it UKCAT goes tits up (mine did) you have another option. Also you really can study for it unlike the UKCAT.

    Yes the day itself was brutal, but also it goes crazy fast when you are in the exam. The only real downside for me is the cost, but I think a weeks salary is worth it for the potential to have guaranteed interviews if you do well (st. georges, swansea and nottingham only interview based on gamsat score)

    (Original post by prospectivemed56)
    I'm in a similar position (2.1 science degree, not embarrassing but not amazing A levels), although I graduated three years ago and have been working for a science magazine since.

    Looking at London-only unis you've got Bart's, St George's, and King's - Imperial stopped their four year course and UCL don't offer it. So you've got at least one non-London option.

    St George's require the GAMSAT, which is a horrific five hour university-level exam in biology, chemistry, physics, and critical analysis. UKCAT is much more straightforward, but only relevant when applying to King's and Bart's.

    Without stellar A level results, your application will really live or die by your entrance exam results and work experience/personal statement. I suggest you spend some time looking at the UKCAT, BMAT, and GAMSAT, and think about which would suit your strengths.

    GAMSAT will require months of dedicated study, and unless you do it in Ireland in March, you won't know your results until after you apply in 2016. However, GAMSAT unis tend to have fewer applicants (they are intimidated by the exam!), so are a bit less competitive. BMAT is a bit less scary, but you only sit the exam after the UCAS deadline so you could have a bad test day and ruin your chances. UKCAT is easier although it requires a lot of concentrated effort in the weeks leading up to the test, but at least you get the results on the day.

    Once you've picked your entrance exam strategy, you need to make your work experience watertight. You'll need sustained (months or years) paid or voluntary experience in a care setting (eg, befriender, hospice volunteer, healthcare assistant, first aider). You'll also need work experience in a hospital or GP practice, at least a week although two weeks is ideal.

    While you're still at uni, it's worth cultivating a tutor or lecturer so you know they'll remember you when it comes to refereeing time!

    But if you spend the next year wisely, you'll be in a great position next October.
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    (Original post by neuronerd)
    Just a heads up with the GAMSAT, it's not insanely hard for science grads. I did 3 months revision whilst working full time and came out in the top 1%. Also you can sit the GAMSAT in London in March (it costs extra). Bonus is that you have your results in May so know what to plan for, and it UKCAT goes tits up (mine did) you have another option. Also you really can study for it unlike the UKCAT.

    Yes the day itself was brutal, but also it goes crazy fast when you are in the exam. The only real downside for me is the cost, but I think a weeks salary is worth it for the potential to have guaranteed interviews if you do well (st. georges, swansea and nottingham only interview based on gamsat score)
    That's fantastic information, thank you! As you might have gathered, I'm a bit scared of the GAMSAT....
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    I promise it just take practice. I used only khan academy (As I hadn't studied physics since GCSEs 2001, or chemistry in any real depth ever!) and the practice papers. Most important thing to do is do the exams in the timed conditions.

    I am happy to give people the practice exams if you don't want to pay


    (Original post by prospectivemed56)
    That's fantastic information, thank you! As you might have gathered, I'm a bit scared of the GAMSAT....
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    (Original post by neuronerd)
    I promise it just take practice. I used only khan academy (As I hadn't studied physics since GCSEs 2001, or chemistry in any real depth ever!) and the practice papers. Most important thing to do is do the exams in the timed conditions.

    I am happy to give people the practice exams if you don't want to pay
    I've applied this time round on UKCAT, but I might be in touch next year if that doesn't pan out...
 
 
 
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