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How about Huck (Huckleberry) as name??? watch

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    no.
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    How do you pronounce your name? Abbreviate it, and don't worry that it's not English!
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    ^I agree. Just find a single syllable short form of your own name. For example, if your user name "kkwonhyeokk" was your name, just try introducing yourself as "Kwon" (unless that's something rude in your mother tongue!). If you just want something easier for the locals to pronounce, that would be fine.

    Brits don't expect overseas students to have English-sounding names, so don't bother about trying to fit in like that. In any case, British names are often shortened to a nickname (Will for William, Steve for Steven, Liz for Elizabeth etc), so it's a very common thing to do.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    ^I agree. Just find a single syllable short form of your own name. For example, if your user name "kkwonhyeokk" was your name, just try introducing yourself as "Kwon" (unless that's something rude in your mother tongue!). If you just want something easier for the locals to pronounce, that would be fine.

    Brits don't expect overseas students to have English-sounding names, so don't bother about trying to fit in like that. In any case, British names are often shortened to a nickname (Will for William, Steve for Steven, Liz for Elizabeth etc), so it's a very common thing to do.
    Thanks! But problem is that my name is made up of just 2 syllables, first name and last name. It's short enough.

    My first name is hyeok, and last one is kwon. Pronunciation of it is like Hyuck probably.
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    I think Huck is fine as it's the closest to your name but huckleberry? Just no xD that is an American name which makes me think of weird people who live in remote towns
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    (Original post by semiquaver)
    How do you pronounce your name? Abbreviate it, and don't worry that it's not English!
    It might sound like Hyuck similar pronounced to Huck.

    I thought it was entirely nothing but I often couldn't respond cos that pronunciation is usually too different!
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    Call yourself John or something.
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    (Original post by Hevachan)
    I think Huck is fine as it's the closest to your name but huckleberry? Just no xD that is an American name which makes me think of weird people who live in remote towns
    Thanks! What i said huckleberry was for that i've heard english people often remind short nick name with full name of those. Maybe i'm wrong sorry

    Anyway, i didn't mean i'll use the name, huckleberry! Lol
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    (Original post by kkwonhyeokk)
    Thanks! What i said huckleberry was for that i've heard english people often remind short nick name with full name of those. Maybe i'm wrong sorry

    Anyway, i didn't mean i'll use the name, huckleberry! Lol
    Oh! I see what you mean xD in that case it makes sense :') as long as you don't mention that it comes from huckleberry then it's fine xD
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    (Original post by kkwonhyeokk)
    Hi guys,

    I'm an international student studying in Nottingham and from Korea.

    I didn't mind that nobody pronounced my name exactly but I figured out people usually call me hey man! bro, oii! something like that.

    Possibly, I think they don't remember my name. Of course, I know it doesn't matter but it should be better to make similar name in English.

    So.. I found Huckleberry, Huck is almost same as my real name. I'm a bit worried about that it has some negative meaning or so old-fashioned feeling or something.

    How about this???
    I don't think 'Hyeok' is going to be too difficult for people to remember. :yy:

    It's pretty normal in the UK for people to call each other man/bro/mate/pal or whatever - it's not really usual to call people by their names in every day conversation so I wouldn't worry that people aren't remembering your name too much
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    (Original post by kkwonhyeokk)
    Pronunciation of it is like Hyuck probably.
    I really don't think that most Brits would struggle to pronounce that. You may be overthinking this.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    I really don't think that most Brits would struggle to pronounce that.
    And even if we did, it's high time we made more of an effort.
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    It's an improvement on an international student I met who introduced herself as Fanny.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    And even if we did, it's high time we made more of an effort.
    I agree! It's disappointing when an overseas student feels the need to change the name they use, just because colleagues don't seem to want to try.
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    It's an improvement on an international student I met who introduced herself as Fanny.
    It's British/US slang which doesn't carry the same connotations in other countries. People shouldn't be made to feel uncomfortable to use their own names. We need to start thinking globally.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    It's British/US slang which doesn't carry the same connotations in other countries. People shouldn't be made to feel uncomfortable to use their own names. We need to start thinking globally.
    It's not so much the slang connotations, but that here knowledge of English names seems to be informed by 19th century literature.

    Yeah, you are right, I'd much rather international students felt comfortable using their names rather than taking English ones. I may slip up on the pronunciation initially, but I'm willing to try.
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    Huckleberry? Just no, that would sound really pretentious as well as strange.
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    It's not so much the slang connotations, but that here knowledge of English names seems to be informed by 19th century literature.
    "Fanny" is modern US slang for "bum"
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    "Fanny" is modern US slang for "bum"
    Whereas 'bum' is US for tramp. An American friend of mine at university found herself re-evaluating her relationship briefly when her English boyfriend, who had just given up smoking, said to her, 'God, I could murder a fag.'
 
 
 
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