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    I don't know how or what to reference.
    Whether I state me own opinion, do I write 'I' in my essays?
    How to start it off.
    My essay question is based on a short piece of text and I feel like i'm just going to end up re writing the text!
    All I want is to look for some essays online just to get a feel for them but there are none, i'm guessing because of plagiarism. So scared my first essay will be crap and It goes towards my final grade!!
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    If it was me here's what I would do:
    Print off a copy of the text an annotate. What are the repercussions of the points made by the text.
    What points does it give a good rebuttal to? Why is it a good rebuttal?
    What points does it give a bad rebuttal to? Why is it a bad rebuttal?
    Is there a point against the text that is strong? Why is it strong?
    Is there a point against the text (this one would NEED an author or to be a common misconception that people will identify with, an argument based on pink elephants will not suffice) why was that author wrong to criticise the text?
    Do you (yes you!) agree with the points the text makes, if so, why, if not why, if part of it, which parts and why not the other parts?

    That, likely, will be the content of your essay. Don't be afraid to write very basic things, that may build up into a stronger statement later on in the essay. Simply is good, it means you have explained it to the audience and made it accessible, just make sure the later, more complicated points are there.

    It is also better to go in-depth on a few points rather than cover a lot of points in a shallow manner. You want to be as concise as you can without compromising on the content. There have been essays I've written where only 3 or so points have been made, and together they've all sent a strong argument at the end. In such an essay there were plenty of points I would have loved to make, but didn't have the room for them. So don't be afraid not to use all of your content.

    http://www.jimpryor.net/teaching/gui...s/writing.html

    http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Philosophy-Paper



    Here is how I used to write philosophy essays:
    Conclusion (I know what I will conclude already).
    Introduction (I know the order of the arguments I want to make, when I get stuck on what to write next I'll look at that again).
    Have all key concepts been properly defined so they are accessible for the audience?

    A statement has been made- what is that statement (a brief over sight into what the philosopher in question has said).

    Then to the specific elements:
    -Within the larger argument this point has been made (perhaps on a set of premises, or perhaps with a particular conclusion. Either something will hinge on what has been said, or it will hinge on something else, at least in the philosopher's view. They will be right or wrong in your opinion, and you will argue why you are correct to think that).
    1)I agree with the statement for all of the reasons it has been made. However, I further agree with it from *new perspective*.
    2) I disagree with the statement for the following reasons, and sincerely believe that she/he be trippin' ballz.
    2i) Going forward with my disagreement the correct conclusion should be X. As we can see from the a posterori evidence that has been available since the philosopher wrongly made these statements, my view is so far consistent, and thus more reliable. **** you stupid philosopher!

    Next set of paragraphs: repeat.

    Usually around half way through I will make some major changes to the way I wanted to write the essay, and even change my mind on some key points.

    I will continue writing the paragraphs.

    Then I'll delete or heavily edit my conclusion.

    Then I'll take a note of the order of my points, and I'll re-write my introduction so it states what comes in the essay.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/analyse
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/persuade?s=t

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/deconstruct?s=t

    These are some key words. You will be doing all 3.

    You will be breaking down the argument(s) the philosopher put forward and analyzing them individually, and premise by premise. You will be explaining what they argued. And you'll be doing so as accurately but concisely as possible. If you can say one thing in 100 words, or make the same point in 20 words, always opt for the 20 words.

    Your analysis will be to say why the philosopher's argument has (or has a lack of) value.

    And you will want to persuade the reader that your position is not just logically consistent, but also a view they want to adopt.

    Edit: referencing: At university look in the handbook for the department that is marking the essay.
    I found this useful for myself, but they may use a different referencing standard. Above all, be consistent with the referencing.
    http://neilstoolbox.com/

    Yes, but answer why your opinion is your opinion. Saying "I think X" is great, but you need to follow it up with "because,"

    Be sure that you put all quotes from the text in quotation marks with the correct page number etc. etc.
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    (Original post by FreshGarbage)
    I don't know how or what to reference.
    Whether I state me own opinion, do I write 'I' in my essays?
    How to start it off.
    My essay question is based on a short piece of text and I feel like i'm just going to end up re writing the text!
    All I want is to look for some essays online just to get a feel for them but there are none, i'm guessing because of plagiarism. So scared my first essay will be crap and It goes towards my final grade!!
    ..I can help you with a good essay. just hit me at jamesfrankird (AT) gmail (DOT)com
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    (Original post by academickanyi)
    ..I can help you with a good essay. just hit me at jamesfrankird (AT) gmail (DOT)com
    I have a few tight deadlines coming up, how much do you charge to write the essays?
 
 
 
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