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Retiring Lecturers Thoughts watch

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    I'll keep this brief...this was the thoughts of a retiring lecturer published in a student blog at a uni which was taken down - fortunately I knew the editor of that blog who has the original script which I will share with you now...

    "There is nothing, no commodity, service or tax I can think of in the last fifty years that can parallel the shockingly declining demographic of cost verses return value of a University Degree in the UK. That is to say the cost has soared and the return value has depleted. A degree in the UK has unforgivably has turned from a wonderful gift presenting an outstanding and deserved opportunity to the brightest and best of the generation that provided the key to a professional and rewarding career to a puppet cash-cow and smoke-screen for politicians to claim how they've inspired a lost generation into education - a generation where most are being horribly deluded into believing that they're degree will make them special, unique and valuable when in reality they are becoming one and the same - an over educated lost mass of sheep looking to find their way in their field of interest where the professional qualification has become grossly over-subscribed."

    Cutting words...any thoughts?
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    This basically comes from business repeatedly saying "there are a lack of skilled workers" the fact is there are more than enough, they just want to pay them less. University has turned into a machine to turn students into job capable people.
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    I think there is a lot of truth in that statement. Economics tells us that the more of something there is the less it is worth; degrees are now common so they have lost their worth. Having a degree really is the new A levels in terms of exclusivity and prestige. To be "well educated" and set yourself apart from other people these days you really need a lot of postgraduate education.

    With life expectancy and retirement shifting by a fair number of years I don't think there is necessarily a problem with people being in education for a longer period of time, on average people will still spend the same number of years in work. The problem is expectation. There is still an assumption and belief that having a degree is something special and will set you up for a nice graduate job. People need to realise that having a degree is pretty much the norm and that it doesn't give privileged access to a VIP job marketplace.
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    (Original post by Sinatrafan)
    I think there is a lot of truth in that statement. Economics tells us that the more of something there is the less it is worth; degrees are now common so they have lost their worth. .
    I agree with you Sinatrafan - I should of added as well that the lecturer's field was English but specifically Journalism (although I think he was speaking about all degrees in the UK). The last part of the quote he is frighteningly correct especially in the Journalist sector - their are only estimated around 9,500 full time employed Journalists in the UK yet Journalism is one of the fastest growing degrees with over 1000 under-graduates taking a course in it...in other words in 10 years there will be 10000 newly qualified individuals with a Journalism degree when there are only 9,500 journalists in the UK. Its ridiculously over-subscribed as I think a lot of other courses.
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    So what is he suggesting here this? It's difficult to infer.

    Should only a maximum of say 25% go to uni? The rest be damned. If it's hard to find your way and be special with a degree what hope is there with out one?

    China is pumping out 1,000,000 grads a year. Hate it or loathe globalization isn't going anywhere.

    (Original post by Daftpunker)
    Itheir are only estimated around 9,500 full time employed Journalists in the UK
    "The UK had increased from 62,000 to 70,000 over the last two years"
    http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/conten...urnalists-2009
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    (Original post by skeptical_john)
    So what is he suggesting here this? It's difficult to infer.

    Should only a maximum of say 25% go to uni? The rest be damned. If it's hard to find your way and be special with a degree what hope is there with out one?

    China is pumping out 1,000,000 grads a year. Hate it or loathe globalization isn't going anywhere.



    "The UK had increased from 62,000 to 70,000 over the last two years"
    http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/conten...urnalists-2009
    The total number working as “journalists, newspaper and periodical editors”

    An editor is not a Journalist.

    "If it's hard to find your way and be special with a degree what hope is there with out one?"

    Many would agree you can be just as special, if not more so, with a CV that says you've had (say at the age of 23) 5 years of uninterrupted work since the age of 18. As opposed to a degree at 23 with no full time experience. You will also be far more likely to be financially secure.
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    (Original post by TheNote)
    This basically comes from business repeatedly saying "there are a lack of skilled workers" the fact is there are more than enough, they just want to pay them less. University has turned into a machine to turn students into job capable people.
    Sadly, this is true. You would be amazed at the number of graduate CVs that have basic spelling and grammatical mistakes, and that includes graduates who supposedly have A* at A level or GCSE. You then have graduates who have almost no enthusiasm about anything, or grads that have no reasoning or problem solving skills.

    This might sound like a dig at grads, but the truth is that education is no longer about learning and application. It is about passing exams. Just how is an employer supposed to differentiate between candidates when a quarter have A or A* grades?

    When I took my A-levels in 1995, I think there were about 4 or 5 people in the whole year that got an A and there certainly weren't any straight A students. Such a thing was pretty rare. Yet even back then, the debate of dumbing down was in full flow. My lecturers at uni were bemoaning the fact that A-level maths no longer prepared students for degree level engineering maths - and they were right.

    And now students have to go £9k+ into debt for each year they study. It is disgusting.
 
 
 
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