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Chemical engineering vs. biomedical engineering vs. neurosurgery watch

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    I need some help on deciding which i want to major in. im willing to take a gap year and go to uni in 2017. what do you guys think?
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    You need to go to medical school for one of them.
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    (Original post by therecovery)
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    Do you want to be a doctor or an engineer?

    To become a surgeon it is a long hard road with medical school only being the first step so if you're not 100% sure then I would suggest that you shouldn't become a doctor. Its 5 years medical school then 2 years foundation training then another 3ish years before you actually do your MRCS examination. Then you are officially a trainee neurosurgeon

    To be a chemical engineer you tend to do 3/4 years to get your degree (most likely 4) then boom you can apply for graduate positions as a chemical engineer. There is bound to be more training you do but you still become a chemical engineer a lot quicker than a doctor of any kind

    With these 3 degrees the questions isn't what should I choose, it's what career path do I want to go down, engineer or doctor? once you've answered that, the decision should be simple
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    Do you want to be a doctor or an engineer?

    To become a surgeon it is a long hard road with medical school only being the first step so if you're not 100% sure then I would suggest that you shouldn't become a doctor. Its 5 years medical school then 2 years foundation training then another 3ish years before you actually do your MRCS examination. Then you are officially a trainee neurosurgeon

    To be a chemical engineer you tend to do 3/4 years to get your degree (most likely 4) then boom you can apply for graduate positions as a chemical engineer. There is bound to be more training you do but you still become a chemical engineer a lot quicker than a doctor of any kind

    With these 3 degrees the questions isn't what should I choose, it's what career path do I want to go down, engineer or doctor? once you've answered that, the decision should be simple
    A doctor. Ive always wanted to be one since I was a kid. Neurosurgery it is then. and thanks

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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    Do you want to be a doctor or an engineer?

    To become a surgeon it is a long hard road with medical school only being the first step so if you're not 100% sure then I would suggest that you shouldn't become a doctor. Its 5 years medical school then 2 years foundation training then another 3ish years before you actually do your MRCS examination. Then you are officially a trainee neurosurgeon

    To be a chemical engineer you tend to do 3/4 years to get your degree (most likely 4) then boom you can apply for graduate positions as a chemical engineer. There is bound to be more training you do but you still become a chemical engineer a lot quicker than a doctor of any kind

    With these 3 degrees the questions isn't what should I choose, it's what career path do I want to go down, engineer or doctor? once you've answered that, the decision should be simple
    You can sit your MRCS examinations from FY1 and potentially have both complete by the time you begin specialty training (if you're keen). Neurosurgery applications are at ST1 so you'll be a neurosurgery trainee straight after FY2 if you're successful in applying (though from what i've seen the SHO's spend little time in theatre - however i've only spent time in one unit so don't know if this is the norm).

    To the OP: Neurosurgery training then takes a minimum of 8 years though realistically it will be longer before you get a consultant job. This is also a specialty where competition is relatively intense so you can't always guarantee that you'll progress through each step in the first instance which should be factored in. Many will also do a PhD which is potentially an extra 3 years.

    If you're going to apply to medicine i'd make sure that you'd enjoy other specialties also, a lot of applicants come in wanting to do neuro/cardiac surgery however not all of them will hold onto this idea when they gain additional experience.
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    (Original post by plrodham1)
    You can sit your MRCS examinations from FY1 and potentially have both complete by the time you begin specialty training (if you're keen). Neurosurgery applications are at ST1 so you'll be a neurosurgery trainee straight after FY2 if you're successful in applying (though from what i've seen the SHO's spend little time in theatre - however i've only spent time in one unit so don't know if this is the norm).

    To the OP: Neurosurgery training then takes a minimum of 8 years though realistically it will be longer before you get a consultant job. This is also a specialty where competition is relatively intense so you can't always guarantee that you'll progress through each step in the first instance which should be factored in. Many will also do a PhD which is potentially an extra 3 years.

    If you're going to apply to medicine i'd make sure that you'd enjoy other specialties also, a lot of applicants come in wanting to do neuro/cardiac surgery however not all of them will hold onto this idea when they gain additional experience.
    I know this isnt much, but thanks alot for the info
    For now I found my uni and my first preference is neurosurgery. But, like you said, there is a possibility of me changing. Yet, im really happy with my choice fkr now ^^

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    (Original post by therecovery)
    I know this isnt much, but thanks alot for the info
    For now I found my uni and my first preference is neurosurgery. But, like you said, there is a possibility of me changing. Yet, im really happy with my choice fkr now ^^

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    It's definitely not a bad thing to think about specialty now and if it helps drive you then by all means keep that in mind.

    I was one of those who started med school absolutely set on cardiothoracics and whilst that is no longer what i want to do the specialty i do want to do isn't a million miles away.
 
 
 
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