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    Today I've been learning about cbt. I have had it as a treatment and found it okay but not as good as emdr/talking therapy.
    A lot of the things the lecturer said about exposure therapy, not looking at the past and even using it on extreme psychosis made me feel like it's not a very compassionate treatment. It made me feel like mental health was just caused by thoughts and was not any deeper than that. I know there is a lot of research about it which I need to read but I feel like it's a thing which makes sense to professionals who have never been mentally ill.

    Summary: is cbt good or flawed?
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    It's very effective for some people, but for others it's not.

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    (Original post by Katty3)
    It's very effective for some people, but for others it's not.

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    True I felt like my teacher was a bit bias because she did a masters in it
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    (Original post by Hevachan)
    Today I've been learning about cbt. I have had it as a treatment and found it okay but not as good as emdr/talking therapy.
    A lot of the things the lecturer said about exposure therapy, not looking at the past and even using it on extreme psychosis made me feel like it's not a very compassionate treatment. It made me feel like mental health was just caused by thoughts and was not any deeper than that. I know there is a lot of research about it which I need to read but I feel like it's a thing which makes sense to professionals who have never been mentally ill.
    I know it can seem superficial, nonsense even, but if you apply this therapy to large populations large numbers of people see benefit. It's worth participating fully in and you may be surprised by the benefit.
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    As far as therapy goes, people tend to benefit just by being there (placebo effect type thing). What will help people depends on them and their issues. Personally I think that people with more complex and long term problems probably need a more in depth talking treatment before CBT will work. However, it does work. Sometimes we get into negative thought patterns and so on as a result of something but that thing passes and we stay in those thought patterns.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    I know it can seem superficial, nonsense even, but if you apply this therapy to large populations large numbers of people see benefit. It's worth participating fully in and you may be surprised by the benefit.
    Thanks for your reply I think that I tried my best to do cbt but had two obstacles: I find it really hard to catch myself in the act of thinking negatively and I always felt like because it was my thoughts that are the problem then I'm to blame... maybe that's a negative thought in itself Haha ^^
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    It's a first port of call IMO, trying to change your way of thinking. With some people it will work, whereas others' brain chemistry is messed up so no amount of therapy will work really.
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    CBT has its place but isn't the be all and end all. CBT for example is useless if someone is acutely psychotic or manic, and it doesn't really work if the patient doesn't want to engage with it. But in some instances it is the best option e.g. for patients with borderline PD. It is also a pretty low risk intervention (compared to medication for example) so you largely have nothing to lose by using it as a therapeutic option.

    Whilst it may be nice to talk about problems in a client based therapy/counselling sort of way the bottom line is that they are often ineffective and don't represent good value for money in a wider healthcare system. All talking based therapies take a lot of time and that just isn't cost effective in the NHS.
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    CBT is primarily for thought disorders/related problems, i.e. anxiety, depression, anger (somewhat), stress and so on. Obviously these aren't exclusively thought based disorders. CBT works by supporting the individual to recognise the situations that cause difficulty, the negative thought patterns and beliefs they have at these times and how it all comes together to culminate in 'unhelpful' behaviours. You then work together to challenge the thoughts or underlying beliefs and put in place practical plans for managing specific situations. As has been mentioned, the individual has to want to do it and have some level of awareness and acceptance of the situation.

    It won't work as well with people who have psychosis, self injurious behaviour, substance misuse and such. The go-to therapy here is DBT which incorporates mindfullness, acceptance and skill based learning. I'm not super familiar with it, but it is essentially about understanding and accepting a situation, being more aware of your feelings and thoughts and what the triggers for heightened arousal are.

    EMDR is primarily for trauma. The current evidence base is small, but growing. As I understand, it is entirely certain how and why it works.

    As Doodle mentioned, there is also an inherent effect of therapy, whereby it doesn't matter what it is, it's the characteristics of the individual, therapist and environment (essentially there are some crucial, core components that yield a positive effect and are independent of the model you use).
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    Some people get better, some get worse, some no change. That's nomothetics for you.
 
 
 
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