MissML
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Can someone explain the Calvin cycle for me please?

Having to learn it (A2 AQA Biology) but the notes are a bit muddled up and the diagram I was given also has the wrong names on it for my specification.
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Hazel37
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A CO2 molecule reacts with RuBP (Ribulose-bisphosphate) to form 2 molecules of GP (glycerate-3-phosphate), this is catalysed by the enzyme Rubisco. GP is then phosphorylated and reduced to form 2 molecules of TP (Triose phosphate). Then most of TP is recycled to RuBP so the cycle can continue. For every 6 cycles of the calvin cycle, 1 glucose molecule is formed.

GP can be used to make amino acids, fatty acids, and carbohydrates.

TP can be used to form hexose sugars (ie glucose). The glucose can be polymerized to form either starch (a-glucose) or cellulose (b-glucose).
TP can also be isomerised to form fructose. Also fructose + glucose = sucrose.
Furthermore, TP can also be used to make glycerol which is a component of triglycerides, and phospholipids.


Hope this helps, the text book can be a bit confusing.
Oh I forgot to mention, I do OCR A2 bio, so hopefully this is still relevant!
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kattoo
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(Original post by Hazel37)
A CO2 molecule reacts with RuBP (Ribulose-bisphosphate) to form 2 molecules of GP (glycerate-3-phosphate), this is catalysed by the enzyme Rubisco. GP is then phosphorylated and reduced to form 2 molecules of TP (Triose phosphate). Then most of TP is recycled to RuBP so the cycle can continue. For every 6 cycles of the calvin cycle, 1 glucose molecule is formed.

GP can be used to make amino acids, fatty acids, and carbohydrates.

TP can be used to form hexose sugars (ie glucose). The glucose can be polymerized to form either starch (a-glucose) or cellulose (b-glucose).
TP can also be isomerised to form fructose. Also fructose + glucose = sucrose.
Furthermore, TP can also be used to make glycerol which is a component of triglycerides, and phospholipids.


Hope this helps, the text book can be a bit confusing.
Oh I forgot to mention, I do OCR A2 bio, so hopefully this is still relevant!
For AQA you also have to learn that ATP (for energy) and NADPH (reduced NADP), both from light dependent reaction, are used to reduce glycerate 3-phosphate to triose phosphate
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Hazel37
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(Original post by kattoo)
For AQA you also have to learn that ATP (for energy) and NADPH (reduced NADP), both from light dependent reaction, are used to reduce glycerate 3-phosphate to triose phosphate
Oh yeah! We have to know that too, I was trying to do it from memory, and I was having a bit of a blonde moment!
Do you just love bio?
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Anno3742
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(Original post by MissML)
Can someone explain the Calvin cycle for me please?

Having to learn it (A2 AQA Biology) but the notes are a bit muddled up and the diagram I was given also has the wrong names on it for my specification.
The light independant part of the textbook can be a bit confusing, i would use the CGP books they are much more useful and summarise the information properly
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