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Is medicine for me? watch

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    Hi,

    I've always been scientifically minded/mathematically minded, and am sure I want a career that involves some sort of application of the science I'm learning now and will learn in the future. I've considered medicine, not only because its brings the lifelong benefits like job security and good pay (which we all have to be honest, are something everyone wants), but I feel like doing medicine I won't be chasing a dream, it'll be something that I would be happy dedicating a lot of my life to, in order to make a contribution to the well being of patients. Sounds 'typical', but honestly it is one of the things that attracts me. Another being that I want to be better than some other doctors I've had treat me - I was in hospital a lot when I was younger, and seriously, some doctors I had consult me/treat me were honestly trash; I always thought that if I became I doctor, I would strive to do better, and actually help my patients.
    Everyone says however, that unless I'm not 100% dedicated, Medicine isn't for me. Any doubts, I should do something else. But I still cannot see how this holds true. I'm 16, just started A-levels, and I certainly haven't got a clear picture of any career plans - I'm sure a great deal of people who get into medical school, and become doctors eventually had the same sort of problems. This has really got to me recently, and with research, has put me off of medicine, along with it being really competitive. Something I might have been more passionate about before, has been changed, due to expectations of others, and further research into what medicine really is.

    If I were to go into a career that was something that involved engineering/maths/physics (STEM subjects), I don't see where it can lead me or what I can do with it. Medicine seems more of a legitimate 'career' choice, because I can actually work to do something. If I did a physics degree, what on earth would I do afterwards?

    In terms of work experience and grades so far, I have no medical/clinical work experience - I'm trying to get some care related work experience as well as some hospital work experience/shadowing, but it is proving difficult . A lot of the places are full with people, or aren't looking for anyone at the moment, which is really frustrating and off-putting.
    For my GCSEs I got:
    Biology: A*
    Chemistry: A*
    Physics: A*
    Maths: A*
    Geography: A*
    ICT: A*
    English language: A
    English literature: A
    Statistics: A
    German: B
    Business studies: B
    Expressive arts: B

    I'm also currently taking A-levels (year 12), in Maths and further maths, Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

    Any advice would be appreciated.
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    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Turtlebunny)
    Hi,

    I've always been scientifically minded/mathematically minded, and am sure I want a career that involves some sort of application of the science I'm learning now and will learn in the future. I've considered medicine, not only because its brings the lifelong benefits like job security and good pay (which we all have to be honest, are something everyone wants), but I feel like doing medicine I won't be chasing a dream, it'll be something that I would be happy dedicating a lot of my life to, in order to make a contribution to the well being of patients. Sounds 'typical', but honestly it is one of the things that attracts me. Another being that I want to be better than some other doctors I've had treat me - I was in hospital a lot when I was younger, and seriously, some doctors I had consult me/treat me were honestly trash; I always thought that if I became I doctor, I would strive to do better, and actually help my patients.
    Everyone says however, that unless I'm not 100% dedicated, Medicine isn't for me. Any doubts, I should do something else. But I still cannot see how this holds true. I'm 16, just started A-levels, and I certainly haven't got a clear picture of any career plans - I'm sure a great deal of people who get into medical school, and become doctors eventually had the same sort of problems. This has really got to me recently, and with research, has put me off of medicine, along with it being really competitive. Something I might have been more passionate about before, has been changed, due to expectations of others, and further research into what medicine really is.

    If I were to go into a career that was something that involved engineering/maths/physics (STEM subjects), I don't see where it can lead me or what I can do with it. Medicine seems more of a legitimate 'career' choice, because I can actually work to do something. If I did a physics degree, what on earth would I do afterwards?

    In terms of work experience and grades so far, I have no medical/clinical work experience - I'm trying to get some care related work experience as well as some hospital work experience/shadowing, but it is proving difficult . A lot of the places are full with people, or aren't looking for anyone at the moment, which is really frustrating and off-putting.
    For my GCSEs I got:
    Biology: A*
    Chemistry: A*
    Physics: A*
    Maths: A*
    Geography: A*
    ICT: A*
    English language: A
    English literature: A
    Statistics: A
    German: B
    Business studies: B
    Expressive arts: B

    I'm also currently taking A-levels (year 12), in Maths and further maths, Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

    Any advice would be appreciated.
    No one can really tell you whether or not you're suited to it. Its something you have to decide upon yourself. Get some work experience, read some junior doctor blogs (there are a fair few around at the moment because of the junior contract protests).

    I would say that Medicine is no longer the financially secure job it once was. You will end up with a large amount of debt, and if the government has its way very little pay when you qualify. Whilst medics don't tend to go in to it just for the medicine, it is something to think about. Especially as the costs don't stop when you qualify.
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    (Original post by Turtlebunny)
    Hi,

    I've always been scientifically minded/mathematically minded, and am sure I want a career that involves some sort of application of the science I'm learning now and will learn in the future. I've considered medicine, not only because its brings the lifelong benefits like job security and good pay (which we all have to be honest, are something everyone wants), but I feel like doing medicine I won't be chasing a dream, it'll be something that I would be happy dedicating a lot of my life to, in order to make a contribution to the well being of patients. Sounds 'typical', but honestly it is one of the things that attracts me. Another being that I want to be better than some other doctors I've had treat me - I was in hospital a lot when I was younger, and seriously, some doctors I had consult me/treat me were honestly trash; I always thought that if I became I doctor, I would strive to do better, and actually help my patients.
    Everyone says however, that unless I'm not 100% dedicated, Medicine isn't for me. Any doubts, I should do something else. But I still cannot see how this holds true. I'm 16, just started A-levels, and I certainly haven't got a clear picture of any career plans - I'm sure a great deal of people who get into medical school, and become doctors eventually had the same sort of problems. This has really got to me recently, and with research, has put me off of medicine, along with it being really competitive. Something I might have been more passionate about before, has been changed, due to expectations of others, and further research into what medicine really is.

    If I were to go into a career that was something that involved engineering/maths/physics (STEM subjects), I don't see where it can lead me or what I can do with it. Medicine seems more of a legitimate 'career' choice, because I can actually work to do something. If I did a physics degree, what on earth would I do afterwards?

    In terms of work experience and grades so far, I have no medical/clinical work experience - I'm trying to get some care related work experience as well as some hospital work experience/shadowing, but it is proving difficult . A lot of the places are full with people, or aren't looking for anyone at the moment, which is really frustrating and off-putting.
    For my GCSEs I got:
    Biology: A*
    Chemistry: A*
    Physics: A*
    Maths: A*
    Geography: A*
    ICT: A*
    English language: A
    English literature: A
    Statistics: A
    German: B
    Business studies: B
    Expressive arts: B

    I'm also currently taking A-levels (year 12), in Maths and further maths, Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

    Any advice would be appreciated.
    Hi you've certainly got the right grades for it and your A level choices are good for medicine.
    You have to have a passion for it because getting into medical school is very hard and rejections will almost certainly come along the way. Also remember you are about to embark on a lifelong journey.

    But as you have rightly said medicine offers a good pay and reasonably stable career, but it also offers the privelegde of having such a diverse range of specialities that you could explore for your career.
    It is also a very rewarding profession and is well respected.


    My advice would be for you to keep trying to get some work experience to enhance your insight into Medicine (I know this is hard but your best bet would be either through your school or through some relatives)

    Good luck
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    I would suggests you get work experience, for instance hospitals and GPs - even going to talks and debates will help you gage your interest
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    (Original post by Turtlebunny)
    I've considered medicine, not only because its brings the lifelong benefits like job security and good pay (which we all have to be honest, are something everyone wants), but I feel like doing medicine I won't be chasing a dream, it'll be something that I would be happy dedicating a lot of my life to, in order to make a contribution to the well being of patients.
    You seem to be in a fairly well-qualified to do medicine, but while it does offer job security, the pay isn't exactly high when you consider the amount of training you have to do first and the hours you have to put in when you're a junior doctor (actually little more than minimum wage for some people, given the hours). The current row over junior doctors' pay is also something to consider: the financial security aspect is likely to diminish in future, not increase. So if you're looking for good pay over a longer term, there are plenty of other scientific vocations which don't need nearly as much training or hard work.
 
 
 
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