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Catholic wedding- what happens exactly? watch

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    My husband and me will be getting married in church next year. As you can tell from the statement above we've done the whole civil wedding thing. What I want to know is what happens in a church wedding (convalidation)? Do I need rings (I don't wear a wedding ring)? Do witnesses have to be Catholic?



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    So it is much like any other church wedding you may have seen. You'll probably have to submit to some cringeworthy discussion beforehand with a priest who has no idea what it's all about (but hopefully these days isn't a paedophile) and have communion and make some hypocritical wows. But you might have a decent backdrop for the photos. What ho!
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    (Original post by Zarek)
    So it is much like any other church wedding you may have seen. You'll probably have to submit to some cringeworthy discussion beforehand with a priest who has no idea what it's all about (but hopefully these days isn't a paedophile) and have communion and make some hypocritical wows. But you might have a decent backdrop for the photos. What ho!
    The discussion with the priest is on going. Can't have communion as I wasn't confirmed (also on going). The not so hypocritical vows are pretty much the same with the ones we had originally.

    I'm more concerned about the ceremony and what happens.

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    (Original post by donutaud15)
    The discussion with the priest is on going. Can't have communion as I wasn't confirmed (also on going). The not so hypocritical vows are pretty much the same with the ones we had originally.

    I'm more concerned about the ceremony and what happens.

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    Wows, rings, sanctimony, nothing to worry about..
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    (Original post by donutaud15)
    My husband and me will be getting married in church next year. As you can tell from the statement above we've done the whole civil wedding thing. What I want to know is what happens in a church wedding (convalidation)? Do I need rings (I don't wear a wedding ring)? Do witnesses have to be Catholic?



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    Lol

    Rings yes witnesses just need to be human.

    I would question why have a catholic ceremony of you aren't a catholic


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    (Original post by paul514)
    Lol

    Rings yes witnesses just need to be human.

    I would question why have a catholic ceremony of you aren't a catholic


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    I am Catholic. Just someone who wasn't practicing for years

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    (Original post by donutaud15)
    I am Catholic. Just someone who wasn't practicing for years

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    I'm a Catholic and I have attended a few Catholic weddings thanks to my big Irish family.

    You will need two other witnesses, excluding the priest, you and your husband. From a quick Google search there now, they don't be have to be baptised! Also, rings are cultural (according to Google) so you don't necessarily have to wear them, but I remember myself reading a few years ago that women must wear a wedding ring in Catholic marriages - it is optional for men. This could have changed in recent years, so ask your priest. He'd be happy to help.
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    Are you having a blessing?
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    (Original post by donutaud15)
    My husband and me will be getting married in church next year. As you can tell from the statement above we've done the whole civil wedding thing. What I want to know is what happens in a church wedding (convalidation)? Do I need rings (I don't wear a wedding ring)? Do witnesses have to be Catholic?
    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Everyone, including the groom, arrives before the bride and her father (or other significant adult in the bride's life). The bride walks down the aisle and is handed over to the groom in front of the altar where the priest welcomes the couple. At this stage, there is normally a hymn sung by the congregation, followed by several readings from the Bible (which the couple choose beforehand with the help of the priest or appointed lay person). You may choose to sing a psalm and/or an alleluia.

    Then the priest will ask you, the couple, if you wish to marry - there are several points here. Firstly, he will check that you are marrying of your own free will (if you want to cop out, now's the time!); he will ask if you are prepared to be faithful to each other and if you are prepared to bring up any children you will have in the Catholic faith. Assuming you both reply that you will do this, you exchange your vows - which is the moment you are married in the eyes of God. Normally you also exchange rings at this stage, as a symbol of these vows. I think you have to have them, but check with your priest. You don't have to wear them after the ceremony! It is interesting to point out that you give each other the sacrament of marriage (hence the need for witnesses); it is not the priest who gives you this sacrament. After this, the congregation prays together with the newlyweds (known as "the prayer of the faithful" ) and then priest blesses the couple. There is often a hymn at this stage.

    To conclude the ceremony, everyone says the Lord's prayer; the priest blesses the congregation and the couple process out, usually while a hymn is being sung. Normally, the couple are followed by their parents - the bride's mother with the groom's father, and the bride's father with the groom's mother (or other significant members of the family in the absence of any of these) and their families.

    If you are having a full-blown Mass during the wedding ceremony, the Eucharistic prayer and Communion will take place after the exchange of vows and the nuptial blessing. The Lord's prayer takes place just before Communion.

    The church where you will be getting married will be used to weddings and will be able to tell you local procedures - notably regarding the use (or not) of confetti.

    When I got married in a Catholic church (27 years ago now!) witnesses had to be christened (any denomination) but did not necessarily have to be Catholic. I believe that nowadays witnesses do not have to be christened but again, check this with your priest if you have a potential witness who fits this bill.
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    I'm a Catholic and I have attended a few Catholic weddings thanks to my big Irish family.

    You will need two other witnesses, excluding the priest, you and your husband. From a quick Google search there now, they don't be have to be baptised! Also, rings are cultural (according to Google) so you don't necessarily have to wear them, but I remember myself reading a few years ago that women must wear a wedding ring in Catholic marriages - it is optional for men. This could have changed in recent years, so ask your priest. He'd be happy to help.
    Thanks for the reply. Kinda concerned about the ring bit so guess I will be asking the priest about it when we see him again.

    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    Are you having a blessing?
    Yeah

    (Original post by Anna Schoon)
    Everyone, including the groom, arrives before the bride and her father (or other significant adult in the bride's life). The bride walks down the aisle and is handed over to the groom in front of the altar where the priest welcomes the couple. At this stage, there is normally a hymn sung by the congregation, followed by several readings from the Bible (which the couple choose beforehand with the help of the priest or appointed lay person). You may choose to sing a psalm and/or an alleluia.

    Then the priest will ask you, the couple, if you wish to marry - there are several points here. Firstly, he will check that you are marrying of your own free will (if you want to cop out, now's the time!); he will ask if you are prepared to be faithful to each other and if you are prepared to bring up any children you will have in the Catholic faith. Assuming you both reply that you will do this, you exchange your vows - which is the moment you are married in the eyes of God. Normally you also exchange rings at this stage, as a symbol of these vows. I think you have to have them, but check with your priest. You don't have to wear them after the ceremony! It is interesting to point out that you give each other the sacrament of marriage (hence the need for witnesses); it is not the priest who gives you this sacrament. After this, the congregation prays together with the newlyweds (known as "the prayer of the faithful" ) and then priest blesses the couple. There is often a hymn at this stage.

    To conclude the ceremony, everyone says the Lord's prayer; the priest blesses the congregation and the couple process out, usually while a hymn is being sung. Normally, the couple are followed by their parents - the bride's mother with the groom's father, and the bride's father with the groom's mother (or other significant members of the family in the absence of any of these) and their families.

    If you are having a full-blown Mass during the wedding ceremony, the Eucharistic prayer and Communion will take place after the exchange of vows and the nuptial blessing. The Lord's prayer takes place just before Communion.

    The church where you will be getting married will be used to weddings and will be able to tell you local procedures - notably regarding the use (or not) of confetti.

    When I got married in a Catholic church (27 years ago now!) witnesses had to be christened (any denomination) but did not necessarily have to be Catholic. I believe that nowadays witnesses do not have to be christened but again, check this with your priest if you have a potential witness who fits this bill.
    Thanks for your reply. It's only gonna be us, his parents and possibly mine so gonna be small. It's useful to know about witnesses as it'll most likely be in laws who I think are Christians, just not Catholic.
 
 
 
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