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    as it says above.
    if you are a teacher, what are the best and worst aspects of the job.

    I want to become a teacher but want to know all the facts first
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    (Original post by doctor_2_be)
    as it says above.
    if you are a teacher, what are the best and worst aspects of the job.

    I want to become a teacher but want to know all the facts first
    I really love to become a teacher as I really want to learn.
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    You should already know your reasons for wanting to teach before you apply.

    I want to be responsible for teaching young adults knowledge and inspire them to take my subject further.
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    Sounds like fun shouting at children, taking away their lunch breaks
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    (Original post by Findlay6)
    You should already know your reasons for wanting to teach before you apply.

    I want to be responsible for teaching young adults knowledge and inspire them to take my subject further.
    i know why i want to become a teacher, but it would be stupid and naive of me to go into something I don't know the pros and cons of.

    there is a reason NQT's quit within the first 5 years of teaching
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    School holidays.
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    (Original post by doctor_2_be)
    i know why i want to become a teacher, but it would be stupid and naive of me to go into something I don't know the pros and cons of.

    there is a reason NQT's quit within the first 5 years of teaching
    True, but there are pros and cons in every job. If you're going to be put off by the cons so early on then it probably isn't for you. It's also important to have a good support network around you so that you don't want to quit within 5 years, and remember than you can move schools or change mentors whenever you like.

    I'm mid-twenties but can easily pass as 18 - that's my con, I won't be taken seriously.
    My partner is a teacher already so I know what I'm getting into. He stays at school until 5, brings work home with him and works until midnight some nights marking work, planning lessons, creating resources, logging behaviour etc. (Another con?) but he only does that because he wants to be a good teacher. It is what you make it.
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    For me the best part is always the kids themselves. They make me laugh and think, touch my heart and frustrate me beyond measure. They are sincere, principled, and occasionally infuriating. No day is ever boring!

    The worst part is bad management.
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    Best: Seeing children improve
    Worst: Rude children
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    I'd rather argue with dumb teenagers than dumb adults.
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    (Original post by doctor_2_be)
    as it says above.
    if you are a teacher, what are the best and worst aspects of the job.

    I want to become a teacher but want to know all the facts first
    I'm not a regular classroom teacher but do some A level teaching and other stuff.

    Good: (1) everyone thinks teaching is vital - you can be proud of what you do; (2) teachers are the most supportive colleagues I have ever worked with - even if they don't know you (3) any appreciation you get from students is for real - and you do (4) you work with minimal supervision (5) not chained to a desk - physical movement is healthy

    Bad: (1) you are always on show even when you feel bad (2) school admin is often hopeless (3) the workload is high (4) you have to deal with impossible situations (5) you never really know how well you are doing
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    (Original post by Findlay6)
    True, but there are pros and cons in every job. If you're going to be put off by the cons so early on then it probably isn't for you. It's also important to have a good support network around you so that you don't want to quit within 5 years, and remember than you can move schools or change mentors whenever you like.

    I'm mid-twenties but can easily pass as 18 - that's my con, I won't be taken seriously.
    My partner is a teacher already so I know what I'm getting into. He stays at school until 5, brings work home with him and works until midnight some nights marking work, planning lessons, creating resources, logging behaviour etc. (Another con?) but he only does that because he wants to be a good teacher. It is what you make it.
    its not that i dont want to go into teaching, its what i've always wanted to do, however, everyone who hears i want to go into teach always say something negative about and how i will be making the biggest mistake of my life. this includes 90% of the teachers who taught me during secondary school.
    i dont mind the long hours, marking, planning, etc.
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    (Original post by ian.slater)
    I'm not a regular classroom teacher but do some A level teaching and other stuff.

    Good: (1) everyone thinks teaching is vital - you can be proud of what you do; (2) teachers are the most supportive colleagues I have ever worked with - even if they don't know you (3) any appreciation you get from students is for real - and you do (4) you work with minimal supervision (5) not chained to a desk - physical movement is healthy

    Bad: (1) you are always on show even when you feel bad (2) school admin is often hopeless (3) the workload is high (4) you have to deal with impossible situations (5) you never really know how well you are doing
    dont you get assessed regularly?
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    (Original post by Luneth)
    I'd rather argue with dumb teenagers than dumb adults.
    Well, it's easier to deceive teenagers than adults.
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    (Original post by doctor_2_be)
    dont you get assessed regularly?
    You raise an important point about the profession: who are you working for and what are you trying to do?

    Ofsted assesses schools and this drives school leaders, whose jobs depend on good ratings. It's true that classroom teachers are somewhat monitored, but many see themselves are working for the long-term good of their students, which isn't quite the same thing as ticking the Ofsted boxes or earning the approval of leaders. And you don't get to see what happens twenty years later.

    One point that shook me about teachers is how few want to become Heads. In many jobs there's a scramble for promotion. Teachers mostly actually want to teach and care about their students.
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    (Original post by ian.slater)
    You raise an important point about the profession: who are you working for and what are you trying to do?

    Ofsted assesses schools and this drives school leaders, whose jobs depend on good ratings. It's true that classroom teachers are somewhat monitored, but many see themselves are working for the long-term good of their students, which isn't quite the same thing as ticking the Ofsted boxes or earning the approval of leaders. And you don't get to see what happens twenty years later.

    One point that shook me about teachers is how few want to become Heads. In many jobs there's a scramble for promotion. Teachers mostly actually want to teach and care about their students.
    In some respect you can see why most teachers don't want to become Heads, the pay as a teacher isn't that great considering all the hidden hours involved and chances of actually becoming head is quite slim. Hence why most teachers teach because they want to inspire the next generation.
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    My passion is to teach.

    To impart and receive wisdom and knowledge is a great feeling for me.

    I once had a history teacher, however my line of expertise is not history, she was my role model for teaching. She was an excellent teacher, with the adequate soft and hard skills more than suitable for the job.

    Thanks to her I entered a role of teaching.
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    (Original post by Findlay6)
    True, but there are pros and cons in every job. If you're going to be put off by the cons so early on then it probably isn't for you. It's also important to have a good support network around you so that you don't want to quit within 5 years, and remember than you can move schools or change mentors whenever you like.

    I'm mid-twenties but can easily pass as 18 - that's my con, I won't be taken seriously.
    My partner is a teacher already so I know what I'm getting into. He stays at school until 5, brings work home with him and works until midnight some nights marking work, planning lessons, creating resources, logging behaviour etc. (Another con?) but he only does that because he wants to be a good teacher. It is what you make it.
    I'm 23 and at a temp job some of the workers thought I had just left school. They thought I was 16. Who on earth would want someone who looks 16 teaching their children?! So I definitely share your concerns about being taken seriously!
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    (Original post by kizzz!)
    I'm 23 and at a temp job some of the workers thought I had just left school. They thought I was 16. Who on earth would want someone who looks 16 teaching their children?! So I definitely share your concerns about being taken seriously!
    I suppose we just have to be assertive from the beginning and be able to manage behaviour well. (Y) good luck.
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    I think the reason for the massive drop out is that people see it as an "easy" career choice. If you go in knowing it will be tough, with long days! Tons of marking if you are anything above year 1 on top of planning and the silly paperwork that is given by the schools individually. But actually doing it is great. I have been a TA for a few years, room leader in a nursery and now doing my teacher training. I know what I am getting myself into so I am not worried. I know that I will have to work a lot in the holidays but that's fine.

    What I love is although holidays are full of planning and marking its very flexible. I have two children and they have to be in school the same days as me. When it is the holidays and it's a nice day we can go to the beach or the zoo. I don't have to plan ages in advance and hope it's sunny. Might seem little but I do the job for my children x


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