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Why are landlords allowed to discriminate against students? watch

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    So I've just got off the phone with the agent in charge of letting a property my boyfriend and I fell in love with and the landlord has rejected our application because she "doesn't want students in her flat" and "wants to hold out for a couple in full time employment". We're at uni 2.5 days a week. 2.5!! And will be working the rest of the time.

    We've just spent the last 5 months working elsewhere where we had no problem what so ever paying our rent there (which was £100s more than this place). We've even saved enough to get by for a good while before needing to work if we wanted to. But those 2.5 days a week we spend improving our career prospects at university are stopping a nice young couple from having a nice place to live.

    Why is this allowed!?
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    Well, being a student is a choice. So it's not like sex/racial discrimination.

    The reason he doesn't want students is because they often trash places. It's like insurance providers when you fill in your occupation, they prefer to insure financial accountants to students because they're often more mature, sensible and don't get black-out-drunk every other day.

    Statistically, I bet more students trash houses than non-students. I don't blame the landlord to be honest. All the houses I saw as a student were almost always treated awfully and an absolute mess....
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    It's not just about whether you can pay your rent, they could ask for a few months up front at a time to help that. What they probably want is someone who's likely to rent long term, i.e. for a number of years and they are more likely to get that from a non-student. It is good business sense really. It's not that landlords discriminate specifically against students, they can just choose who they want to let to, they probably also wouldn't want to let to people with no job, pets, sometimes children because they are just trying to avoid the possible headaches that could come with that group.
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    Students are not a protected group. Discrimination is legal on almost any basis, except for protected characteristics like race, disability, and so on. Unfortunately there's nothing you can do here except appeal to the landlord's better nature, it's their property and they can do what they like with it. :sadnod:
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    It's her flat, her rules.
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    (Original post by xOHarriet)
    So I've just got off the phone with the agent in charge of letting a property my boyfriend and I fell in love with and the landlord has rejected our application because she "doesn't want students in her flat" and "wants to hold out for a couple in full time employment". We're at uni 2.5 days a week. 2.5!! And will be working the rest of the time.

    We've just spent the last 5 months working elsewhere where we had no problem what so ever paying our rent there (which was £100s more than this place). We've even saved enough to get by for a good while before needing to work if we wanted to. But those 2.5 days a week we spend improving our career prospects at university are stopping a nice young couple from having a nice place to live.

    Why is this allowed!?
    I'm a student but if I was a landlord I would prefer not to have students. They are not reliable, not financially secure, noisy, messy and annoying.
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    Did you tell the landlord that you were students, or do they have some way of finding out whether you want them to or not? I mean, sure, they could look you up on Facebook, but that's still information you choose to put out there.

    I mean, are you required to disclose the fact that you're attending University to a potential landlord in Britain? I think in the US, you wouldn't necessarily have to disclose that information even if they asked, because they have no way of checking. There's a FERPA law here that says the school isn't allowed to disclose even your enrolment status to anyone. Even your parents can't ask.

    I would definitely consider withholding that information (perhaps even lying if I could get away with it), especially if I had a job and had other excuses for coming and going. Like, for instance, you might not tell an employer that you're looking for a job temporarily rather than just until you start school. A lot of people don't like to deal with students, so it's pretty easy to be discreet about it if you're not the partying type and you keep to yourself. You won't stand out as that type of person.
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    (Original post by jeremy1988)
    Did you tell the landlord that you were students, or do they have some way of finding out whether you want them to or not?

    I mean, are you required to disclose the fact that you're attending University to a potential landlord in Britain? I think in the US, you wouldn't necessarily have to disclose that information even if they asked, because they have no way of checking. There's a FERPA law here that says the school isn't allowed to disclose even your enrolment status to anyone. Even your parents can't ask.

    I would definitely consider withholding that information (perhaps even lying if I could get away with it), especially if I had a job and had other excuses for coming and going. Like, for instance, you might not tell an employer that you're looking for a job temporarily rather than just until you start school. A lot of people don't like to deal with students, so it's pretty easy to be discreet about it if you're not the partying type and you keep to yourself. You won't stand out as that type of person.
    You can withhold information if you like, in which case the agency will probably just tell you to jog on. They have no obligation to help you if you don't answer their questions fully. Many estate agents now run credit checks on potential tenants, which will include checking on sources of income. If you refuse such checks then they have no obligation to offer you a place to live.
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    (Original post by Dez)
    You can withhold information if you like, in which case the agency will probably just tell you to jog on. They have no obligation to help you if you don't answer their questions fully. Many estate agents now run credit checks on potential tenants, which will include checking on sources of income. If you refuse such checks then they have no obligation to offer you a place to live.
    Well, my impression was that the OP was paying for school via money earned from a part-time job. Presumably the credit check wouldn't reveal how they were spending their money? I mean, checking to see if you have an income (and where it comes from) is one thing, but I would assume they couldn't ask for an accounting of what you do with every penny or an account balance.

    When I say withholding information, I don't mean leaving something blank or refusing to answer. I mean giving them the answer they want to hear.

    What I mean is, if they ask if you're a student, and you say that you're not, and mention your job... will they necessarily find out that you're lying in that case?
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    (Original post by jeremy1988)
    Well, my impression was that the OP was paying for school via money earned from a part-time job. Presumably the credit check wouldn't reveal how they were spending their money? I mean, checking to see if you have an income (and where it comes from) is one thing, but I would assume they couldn't ask for an accounting of what you do with every penny or an account balance.

    When I say withholding information, I don't mean leaving something blank or refusing to answer. I mean giving them the answer they want to hear.

    What I mean is, if they ask if you're a student, and you say that you're not, and mention your job... will they necessarily find out that you're lying in that case?
    You'd have to disclose that you're only working part-time I think. Something like this might work though, since essentially you're avoiding the question rather than refusing to answer it (or lying).
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    (Original post by Dez)
    You can withhold information if you like, in which case the agency will probably just tell you to jog on. They have no obligation to help you if you don't answer their questions fully. Many estate agents now run credit checks on potential tenants, which will include checking on sources of income. If you refuse such checks then they have no obligation to offer you a place to live.
    I would never rent a place through an agency, although it's unavoidable in London I expect. I would stick to university vetted housing lists
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    (Original post by xOHarriet)
    So I've just got off the phone with the agent in charge of letting a property my boyfriend and I fell in love with and the landlord has rejected our application because she "doesn't want students in her flat" and "wants to hold out for a couple in full time employment". We're at uni 2.5 days a week. 2.5!! And will be working the rest of the time.

    We've just spent the last 5 months working elsewhere where we had no problem what so ever paying our rent there (which was £100s more than this place). We've even saved enough to get by for a good while before needing to work if we wanted to. But those 2.5 days a week we spend improving our career prospects at university are stopping a nice young couple from having a nice place to live.

    Why is this allowed!?
    TheSite > Housing > Housing Problems > Discrimination by landlords

    Discrimination by landlords
    What do you do if your landlord has taken a disliking to you – not because of what you do in your own home, but because of who you are? If your landlord is discriminating against you because of your race, sexuality or gender, you don’t have to put up with it.
    It's illegal for landlords to judge you by race, gender or sexuality.

    Is it illegal for landlords to discriminate against students?
    Stereotypes about students being noisy or causing their neighbours difficulty can lead some letting agents and landlords to operate ‘no student’ policies. Young people who claim benefits can also be turned away. Unfortunately, this is legal. A landlord is entitled to turn someone down based on their financial circumstances, as it’s riskier to let to someone who doesn’t earn a regular wage.

    http://www.thesite.org/housing/housi...ords-7920.html
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    (Original post by JeremyOU)
    TheSite > Housing > Housing Problems > Discrimination by landlords

    Discrimination by landlords
    What do you do if your landlord has taken a disliking to you – not because of what you do in your own home, but because of who you are? If your landlord is discriminating against you because of your race, sexuality or gender, you don’t have to put up with it.
    It's illegal for landlords to judge you by race, gender or sexuality.

    Is it illegal for landlords to discriminate against students?
    Stereotypes about students being noisy or causing their neighbours difficulty can lead some letting agents and landlords to operate ‘no student’ policies. Young people who claim benefits can also be turned away. Unfortunately, this is legal. A landlord is entitled to turn someone down based on their financial circumstances, as it’s riskier to let to someone who doesn’t earn a regular wage.

    http://www.thesite.org/housing/housi...ords-7920.html
    I understand this, but my financial circumstances aren't those of a typical student. Nothing about me is typical to being a student other than that I go to uni a couple of days a week. I'm not loud, I don't get drunk every night, I don't trash places. I want to pay good money (which I can afford after spending 5 months working 55+ hours a week and having no time to spend money) to live somewhere nice.
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    (Original post by xOHarriet)
    So I've just got off the phone with the agent in charge of letting a property my boyfriend and I fell in love with and the landlord has rejected our application because she "doesn't want students in her flat" and "wants to hold out for a couple in full time employment". We're at uni 2.5 days a week. 2.5!! And will be working the rest of the time.

    We've just spent the last 5 months working elsewhere where we had no problem what so ever paying our rent there (which was £100s more than this place). We've even saved enough to get by for a good while before needing to work if we wanted to. But those 2.5 days a week we spend improving our career prospects at university are stopping a nice young couple from having a nice place to live.

    Why is this allowed!?
    I was in a relatively similar situation as you. Call the agent and ask them if it would be possible if you paid for a higher deposit / made a larger advance payment (like half a year).
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    (Original post by xOHarriet)
    I understand this, but my financial circumstances aren't those of a typical student. Nothing about me is typical to being a student other than that I go to uni a couple of days a week. I'm not loud, I don't get drunk every night, I don't trash places. I want to pay good money (which I can afford after spending 5 months working 55+ hours a week and having no time to spend money) to live somewhere nice.
    your potential landlord is allowed to discriminate, but you could perhaps convince him/her to rent the place to you.
    the agent probably just told the landlord the basics like: 'its a student who works part time', rather than your actual circumstances.
    I would try again.
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    As a private landlord, I also don't rent out to students for many of the reasons listed above. DSS and students are just not worth the risk if it's easy to find full time employed tenants in the area. Which it is for me luckily. Even though I understand not all students are the same, it is a bit harder to lure the private renters and full time employed when there are already students in the flat when renting on a room by room basis. It's easy to complain when you're a student but if you were in our situation you'd probably feel the same if you had a brand new house.

    Just find somewhere else to live.
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    Hi and welcome to 'The World', first lesson: Life's not fair. Look for student housing or stand on principle...and be homeless.
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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    Hi and welcome to 'The World', first lesson: Life's not fair. Look for student housing or stand on principle...and be homeless.
    Even if I was going to go for student housing, every single student place I've looked at is available September 2016. I've been on placement. Lectures start again beginning of November. There is nowhere left.
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    Nobody wants other people to ruin their property with parties, like I wouldn't want *** shots up the wall and the smell of weed in the curtains unless it was me.
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    (Original post by xOHarriet)
    Even if I was going to go for student housing, every single student place I've looked at is available September 2016. I've been on placement. Lectures start again beginning of November. There is nowhere left.
    Looked at 'myspareroom' and others like it? There's usually always stuff on there and most of them don't mind students. Tbh, you're probably going to have to lower your expectations. It's not ideal, been there done that, but it's short term until you get something better.
 
 
 
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