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HELP with homework watch

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    Attachment 470759
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    I'm not the best...but here's what I know.

    -Graphite is made up of a covalent bonding. This means it is quite strong so it would last longer in the drill.
    -It has a high melting point so it wouldn't melt or bend or anything.
    -The electrons inside of it are free to move so conducts electricity (don't know if this is relevant to the question. Im not very drill-savvy pmsl)

    -Leah ;3
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    Graphite has a layered structure held together by covalent bonds. These layers are uniform and easily slide over each other when a force is applied, hence the slippery nature.

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    (Original post by icantfeelmyface)
    Graphite has a layered structure held together by covalent bonds. These layers are uniform and easily slide over each other when a force is applied, hence the slippery nature.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Much better answer then I gave, ive learnt something there. Thank you
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    To further this, carbon atoms in graphite bond to three other carbon atoms. This forms a trigonal planar structure and so graphite is structured in planes. These planes are held together by weak Van der Waals forces. These forces are caused by the delocalised electron from each carbon atom (since it forms three bonds, there is a spare electron). This gives rise to it's 'slippery' nature.

    The delocalised electron allows a current to pass through graphite.
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    (Original post by LeahJade)
    I'm not the best...but here's what I know.

    -Graphite is made up of a covalent bonding. This means it is quite strong so it would last longer in the drill.
    -It has a high melting point so it wouldn't melt or bend or anything.
    -The electrons inside of it are free to move so conducts electricity (don't know if this is relevant to the question. Im not very drill-savvy pmsl)

    -Leah ;3
    Thanks helped very much
 
 
 
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