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Why Medicine ???? (poll) watch

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    i agree, there are lots of other good jobs to choose if you're smart.
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    Being a doctor is something you have to dedicate your entire life to, you don't do it for the pay or the status of the job you do it because you feel passionately (sp) about science and it's the one thing that interests you most. Not only that but because you combine the theory with the application and the science with people. It's like a voyage of discovery with the research and technology. But also when you've seen first hand what a difference a doctor can make to someone's life it feels like it's the most important and rewarding job in the world and doing anything else with your life makes you feel like your life is not complete and that you've wasted it because you feel as strongly as you do
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    I know of loads of people who have gone to work in Aus for 6 months at SHO level - and similarly there are doctors from abroad doing that here. I don't think it's *that* difficult to do, especially if you make contacts during your elective. Similarly, charity's are crying out for doctors to work on a volunteer basis - so the opportunities are there if you want them. (Travel is only a small part of my ambition by the way - just one factor which I've probably considered more since starting medschool).

    Yes, it's hard work - long hours, and pay that debateably doesn't reflect the dedication and hard work involved. However, I wouldn't call sitting in a clinic or hospital 'dull'. Afterall, that's quite a large proportion of a hospital doctors work - seeing patients etc and what I'm expecting to be doing for a large part of my career. Its the paperwork and 'red tape' that I regard as being the 'dull part' of being a doctor.
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    (Original post by joyabbott)
    I know of loads of people who have gone to work in Aus for 6 months at SHO level - and similarly there are doctors from abroad doing that here. I don't think it's *that* difficult to do, especially if you make contacts during your elective. Similarly, charity's are crying out for doctors to work on a volunteer basis - so the opportunities are there if you want them. (Travel is only a small part of my ambition by the way - just one factor which I've probably considered more since starting medschool).

    Yes, it's hard work - long hours, and pay that debateably doesn't reflect the dedication and hard work involved. However, I wouldn't call sitting in a clinic or hospital 'dull'. Afterall, that's quite a large proportion of a hospital doctors work - seeing patients etc and what I'm expecting to be doing for a large part of my career. Its the paperwork and 'red tape' that I regard as being the 'dull part' of being a doctor.
    tavelling to other countries and staying there to work for another 10 years or so is nothing adventurous that i can assure you..Traveling to lots of countries and finishing your job at places at a smaller interval of time IS adventurous like jobs such as insurance agents or something.

    and you might say that siting in a clinic is fun and stuff...but after siting there in the same room,same chair,same atmosphere,same room,same table,same nurses,same type of patients,same type of diseases (for common ones,what are the chances you see a rare one anyways?) and risking your life for more than 6 months....who could actually say that it is fun doing that?Heck,most of the doctors i know say that its boring doing that...we actually say its fun cause we havent actually experienced it yet.
    its pretty usual that a person to say that their job is boring,but doctors doesnt have much of a choice

    To me...i like being a doctor cause i liked helping people...coming back home and being thanked by your patients and watching that your patients actually had a good treatment from you cause you saved their lives is actually really precious to me.It makes you feel alive,makes you feel needed or heck even makes you feel nice after a hard days work...thats why i wanted to be a doc...
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    oh I'm only talking about going abroad for 6 months or so - hopefully as part of my SHO training (mind due if you lived in the UK, you'd probably appreciate my need for a change!!!)

    I admit, the job is bound to become samey after a while, but i don't think that necessarily means it is boring. One of the things I love about medicine is that no 2 patients are ever the same. OK, most of medicine isn't exciting - unless yu work for a trauma team, HEMs or whatever, but I still think it's fascinating and there's still a huge amount of job satisfaction to be gained even from clinics. I'm a 3rd year now, and have been on clinical placements since March. In just this short period of time, I've seen how the enthusiasm and general attitudes of different doctors determines what they personally get out of the job. The variation is astounding. I certainly know which 'type' of doctor I aspire to be.
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    (Original post by joyabbott)
    oh I'm only talking about going abroad for 6 months or so - hopefully as part of my SHO training (mind due if you lived in the UK, you'd probably appreciate my need for a change!!!)

    I admit, the job is bound to become samey after a while, but i don't think that necessarily means it is boring. One of the things I love about medicine is that no 2 patients are ever the same. OK, most of medicine isn't exciting - unless yu work for a trauma team, HEMs or whatever, but I still think it's fascinating and there's still a huge amount of job satisfaction to be gained even from clinics. I'm a 3rd year now, and have been on clinical placements since March. In just this short period of time, I've seen how the enthusiasm and general attitudes of different doctors determines what they personally get out of the job. The variation is astounding. I certainly know which 'type' of doctor I aspire to be.
    whatever doc you`re gonna be
    you`re gonna be a great one,that i can assure you...your words itself already proves so...

    and yes,i must agree that every patient is not the same everytime but then again,no matter how you`re looking at it...you`re not there to talk to the patients....you`re job is to heal them,diagnose them,treat them...It would be fair enough if you categorise them as patients,but they have diseases...which are the SAME..and thus the same methods are applied...most of the time that is..

    and yeah,i like the fact that you meet people everyday...and i believe you and me have one thing in common,as i said before...the joy of having to treat a patient and come home with with a darn good mood.
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    In a way though you are there to talk to patients. Some people don't have 'physical problems', and for those that do, there is frequently a psychological component that can only be 'treated' by means of communiction - a little bit of reassurance may be all it takes. One of the vascular surgeons I'm attached to at the moment is absolutely fantastic. one of the things he has instilled upon me, perhaps more than anything else, is the importance of what the patient wants - yes, you might be able to theoretically repair a 90 year olds AAA, but that's a huge operation, which could kill them - they may prefer for it to be left well alone and enjoy the time they have left. In this situation, you're 'treating' them by doing nothing -You need to reassure them and support their decision.

    Patients do differ tremendously despite the condition being the same, and I think this is particularly true in medicine. So many patients, particularly the elderly, have co-morbidities, so you really do have to consider and treat the whole picture.

    You're right about the satisfaction though - I can't think of any other career which can be so rewarding, and I just hope my career lives up to my high expectations.
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    from the stuff u guys said, all doctors should never be craply paid then.
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    Public Apology To:
    joyabbott

    Sorry, I guess I was being a fool. Toooooo much stress and stuff going on, I'm starting to get mood swings

    Once again, sorry.
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    No problem - though a few years ago I may not have taken it quite so well.
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    in reply to the post by LovelyGirl, i think that the reason why a lot of asian parents want their children to do medicine is for job security. when asians first came to this country in the 70s, racism was rife and it was very difficult to get good jobs, they were heavily discriminated against. however, having a good qualification meant that they could climb the career ladder better. my family came over from uganda in 1972 after being chucked out by idi amin. in uganda, he owned several large businesses and factories, however, he arrived in england penniless and had to work on the factory floor. he was determined that none of his children should suffer the indignity that he had. my dad's brother studied economics at cambridge in the early 70s however was advised by his tutors not to go into investment banking due to racism, hence he became an accountant. my dad was basically forced into pharmacy for 'job security' reasons, and although we are v comfortable financially, he would have loved to have studied history - something that he was passionate about. however, realistically, if he had studied history, he would have had difficulty finding a 'good job' in those days.

    nonetheless, the situation is dramatically different today. nonetheless the fear of discrimination is still rife in people's minds, hence the reason why a lot of asian parents wish their children to have a career where they believe racism will not play a large part in promotions etc.
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    (Original post by niksip)
    in reply to the post by LovelyGirl, i think that the reason why a lot of asian parents want their children to do medicine is for job security. when asians first came to this country in the 70s, racism was rife and it was very difficult to get good jobs, they were heavily discriminated against. however, having a good qualification meant that they could climb the career ladder better. my family came over from uganda in 1972 after being chucked out by idi amin. in uganda, he owned several large businesses and factories, however, he arrived in england penniless and had to work on the factory floor. he was determined that none of his children should suffer the indignity that he had. my dad's brother studied economics at cambridge in the early 70s however was advised by his tutors not to go into investment banking due to racism, hence he became an accountant. my dad was basically forced into pharmacy for 'job security' reasons, and although we are v comfortable financially, he would have loved to have studied history - something that he was passionate about. however, realistically, if he had studied history, he would have had difficulty finding a 'good job' in those days.

    nonetheless, the situation is dramatically different today. nonetheless the fear of discrimination is still rife in people's minds, hence the reason why a lot of asian parents wish their children to have a career where they believe racism will not play a large part in promotions etc.
    i disagree fully....im an asian,chinese to be exact...i think i should know better..
    most of my friends...if their parents are forcing them to do medicine...it is only for one reason...ego..and pride..that i can gaurantee..
    you dont know how much they prioritise their statuses and their dignity...thats for the chinese...as for the others,im not too sure...

    and among the ways of getting those statuses is to achieve something really difficult,like sending their children to medical school and becoming a doc,cause medicine is one of the hardest possible courses available.

    But there are a handful,especialy those who come from poverty who are forcing their children to do something huge to survive,for their own good..

    thats all.
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    i really am quite shocked at some of your replies! The truth is you are in uni for 5 years then you've got your PRHO years on top and you are worked like a slave and ur on a minimal income, it's only after your qualified (10 yrs down the line) when u make a tidy income. How then is money the reason for the career?????

    as for respect, sure u get a lot- but i'm noticing with recent things like Shippman that the respect is slipping in some cases. Patients are intent on being given antibiotics for every thing and do not understand when their doctors tell them that antibiotics are useless in that senario.

    i work in the local surgery where my mum is a doctor. I see this all the time. As for stress......it's immense, the hours are long and my mum can't drink in local pubs because everyone linches her about their knee problems or their recent surge on diorrhea.

    I want to do medicine because it is a rewarding job but also because i like tghe god damn challenge and i love meeting people. I wanted something new every day and a job where i keep learning throuought my career. ]

    I'm really pissed off with people taking the sppaces on the courses for the money and the so called respect when there's people like me who generally want to do it!

    thank you
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    when i was referring to asians, i was thinking more of asians that originate from the sub-continent (india, pakistan). some of my indian and pakistani friends that are doing medicine have been encouraged by their parents because of 'job security' and probably, as malaysiandude says, becuase of ego. however, a lot of asian parents are actively discouraging medicine - i think that the rose-tinted view of doctors has definitely disappeared over the last decade. i personally could never be a doc but have a lot of respect for people that do want to do medicine.

    in addition, i do think that many enter the profession blindly. i mean you have to make a decision when you are 16-18, relatively young in life. how do you know what you want to do for the rest of your life. that's why often the postgrad docs tend to do well, because they are mature and have a better idea of what they want to do. please not, i do not mean that all students starting medicine at 18 are entering the career blindly, merely there are substantial number who are entering for the 'wrong reasons' - whatever they may be!
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    (Original post by bethhop)
    I want to do medicine because it is a rewarding job but also because i like tghe god damn challenge and i love meeting people. I wanted something new every day and a job where i keep learning throuought my career. ]

    I'm really pissed off with people taking the sppaces on the courses for the money and the so called respect when there's people like me who generally want to do it!

    thank you
    You dont just meet people by being a doctor...there are a lot more jobs where you can meet people..like business..
    and its not like you dont learn anything new when you do other jobs ya know?

    And you cant really blame people like them to be aiming for cash,its fare enough that they want cash after all the **** and sweat that they had to go through...its really just human nature to be wanting more after giving a lot...i mean...think of this
    if you were to have worked so hard but got a B for your overall results...wouldnt you think that the world is unfair?Be logical and not emotional...

    overall i can tell good doctors can be divided into 2 categories which are those who likes money from their patients...and those who like to treat patients..
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    I didn't do medicine because I am of more used to the world doing what I do now.
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    (Original post by shiny)
    I didn't do medicine because I am of more used to the world doing what I do now.
    so are you gonna study for the rest of your life?
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    (Original post by MalaysianDude)
    so are you gonna study for the rest of your life?
    Yep student 4ever
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    which part of medicine is actually really stressful though? All first 5 years? The last (5th) year? The study/work load? Exams? Training? Becoming a doctor?

    Would u agree most other subjects in University will be stressful though?
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    I went to medlink last year and at LEAST 1/4 the number of people there are asian (chinese not included). That's seriously overwhelming.
 
 
 
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