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    Does anyone know how these are calculated?

    e.g.
    "Candidates were called for interview if their TSA score was above 57.75 or their contextual GCSE score was above 0.00 (i.e. a positive score). Candidates not meeting either of these criteria may have been invited for interview after careful consideration of other factors".
    Keble geography admissions feedback.
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    (Original post by Pars12)
    Does anyone know how these are calculated
    http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/...ls_08/s3.shtml
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    That's the government's calculation. I'm not sure if Oxford uses the same method.
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    Maybe BrasenoseAdm can help...?
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    This might help slightly (not that I understand it):
    https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/reque...ncoming-726239
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    (Original post by fluteflute)
    This might help slightly (not that I understand it):
    https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/reque...ncoming-726239
    Easy peasy. Not...

    But I *think* it means the candidate gets a positive score if they are outperforming their peers in the context of their school.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Maybe BrasenoseAdm can help...?
    Contextualised GCSE A*s estimates, using leastsquares, the expected number of A*s a candidate will have using the
    proportion of pupils obtaining 5 or more GCSEs at grades Cand higher at the candidates’ schools as a single predictor.

    The dataset consists of all University applicants with 6 ormore GCSEs. Actual A* performance (Y) is compared with the predicted
    score (Y-hat). The data is then normalised as follows: whereY-hat = Y, a candidate is scored at 0. Over- or under- performance is expressed
    in terms of ‘standard deviations’ from the slope of the linear regression line.
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    (Original post by BrasenoseAdm)
    Contextualised GCSE A*s estimates, using leastsquares, the expected number of A*s a candidate will have using the
    proportion of pupils obtaining 5 or more GCSEs at grades Cand higher at the candidates’ schools as a single predictor.

    The dataset consists of all University applicants with 6 ormore GCSEs. Actual A* performance (Y) is compared with the predicted
    score (Y-hat). The data is then normalised as follows: whereY-hat = Y, a candidate is scored at 0. Over- or under- performance is expressed
    in terms of ‘standard deviations’ from the slope of the linear regression line.
    Er, thanks

    So was this correct? "I *think* it means the candidate gets a positive score if they are outperforming their peers in the context of their school."
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    (Original post by BrasenoseAdm)
    Contextualised GCSE A*s estimates, using leastsquares, the expected number of A*s a candidate will have using the
    proportion of pupils obtaining 5 or more GCSEs at grades Cand higher at the candidates’ schools as a single predictor.

    The dataset consists of all University applicants with 6 ormore GCSEs. Actual A* performance (Y) is compared with the predicted
    score (Y-hat). The data is then normalised as follows: whereY-hat = Y, a candidate is scored at 0. Over- or under- performance is expressed
    in terms of ‘standard deviations’ from the slope of the linear regression line.
    The proportion of pupils getting 5 A* - C changes each year. When doing this do you use the average of say the last five years or the data of year the applicant sat the GCSE? how does it work?
    thanks
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    (Original post by BrasenoseAdm)
    Contextualised GCSE A*s estimates, using least squares, the expected number of A*s a candidate will have using the
    proportion of pupils obtaining 5 or more GCSEs at grades C and higher at the candidates’ schools as a single predictor.

    The dataset consists of all University applicants with 6 or more GCSEs. Actual A* performance (Y) is compared with the predicted
    score (Y-hat). The data is then normalised as follows: where Y-hat = Y, a candidate is scored at 0. Over- or under- performance is expressed
    in terms of ‘standard deviations’ from the slope of the linear regression line.
    Are you saying (broadly) that the result is positive if an applicant's number of A*'s is greater than the expected number for the applicant's school? If so, they must be interviewing an awful lot of geography applicants at Keble!


    Also, from 2012 The Welsh Baccalaureate GCSE was compulsory and awarded on coursework only. I am not aware of any pupils failing it (I don't think the teachers let that happen). It counts as 3 Gcse grade A's! I quite approve of the work they do for it but it does seem that it will seriously skew your statistics. Or possibly, the Welsh Assembly has seriously shot itself in the foot.
 
 
 
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