Turn on thread page Beta
    • Community Assistant
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    okay so this a deep topic but we ended up discussing it in our practical today & its a Thursday night so I really CBA trawling through the RCVS "rules" to see if this is true.
    Basically I've heard lots of stories of vets refusing to do euthanasias & our clinician (who is a vet) said that if a dog is rehomable & healthy there is no legal issue in refusing to do a euthanasia. However, a girl in my group was ADAMANT that this is not true and if an owner wants a dog putting down, even if it's healthy & has no behavioural issues, we would have to do it BY LAW. as far as I'm aware that doesn't sound right, but I didn't know if anyone knew a bit more about it (mainly so i can prove this girl wrong should it come up again, but it's also a really important thing that I'll have to know in future)
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    Of course you don't have to, you can refuse to euthanase an animal if you don't think it's the right thing to do (although I'd be wary that you not doing it may compromise the animal's welfare e.g. owner tries to bash it on the head themselves). For that matter, if absolutely necessary you could euthanase an animal against the owner's wishes if it truly was in the best interests of the animal's welfare (i.e. they're absolutely f***** and there's no hope of treatment).

    Your boss may not like you pissing off clients though.
    • Community Assistant
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by ouchthathurts)
    Of course you don't have to, you can refuse to euthanase an animal if you don't think it's the right thing to do (although I'd be wary that you not doing it may compromise the animal's welfare e.g. owner tries to bash it on the head themselves). For that matter, if absolutely necessary you could euthanase an animal against the owner's wishes if it truly was in the best interests of the animal's welfare (i.e. they're absolutely f***** and there's no hope of treatment).

    Your boss may not like you pissing off clients though.
    this is what I thought, surely as long as you do anything with the animals welafre first & foremost & you can justify wha you did surely somone will back you up? this girl said if you refuse to do it you have to give the client the contact details of a vet who is willing to do it?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Vets like any other person providing a good or service can refuse to give that service or refuse to sell the good to that person (bad attitude by the customer for example). The only time it is an issue is if the reason for not giving that service is racist, sexist, etc.
    Personally I wouldn't put a healthy pet down unless serious behavioural issues. Although I am not a vet xD

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    ^ Non vets, non vetting lol

    Yes you can, but if they're absolutely pro PTS even having been given the options and you refuse, somebody else will more than likely do it, whether that be in your practice or another one
    • Community Assistant
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    ^ Non vets, non vetting lol

    Yes you can, but if they're absolutely pro PTS even having been given the options and you refuse, somebody else will more than likely do it, whether that be in your practice or another one
    But you don't have to give them the contact details of someone who will?
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by Louiseee_)
    But you don't have to give them the contact details of someone who will?
    Not that I'm aware

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    This is where communication skills really do come into play in trying to persuade the owner to do the right thing (whether that is to PTS an animal when the time had already come, or to look into other options).

    It's a difficult situation though - if someone is adamant that they want an animal euthanising and you refuse (and don't point them to someone who will), what if they take matters into their own hands? ie try to kill the animal in a more cruel way. Would the vet who refused euthanasia be responsible?
    • Community Assistant
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by SilverstarDJ)
    This is where communication skills really do come into play in trying to persuade the owner to do the right thing (whether that is to PTS an animal when the time had already come, or to look into other options).

    It's a difficult situation though - if someone is adamant that they want an animal euthanising and you refuse (and don't point them to someone who will), what if they take matters into their own hands? ie try to kill the animal in a more cruel way. Would the vet who refused euthanasia be responsible?
    Hmmmm this is where it gets tricky. Praise yeezus I have 5 years to figure this sort of thing out! But I was just wondering, on the face of it, if you refused to do a euthanasia would the RCVS have to get involved? (In the hypothetical situation that the owner has the animal rehomed or takes it to a different vet)
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by SilverstarDJ)
    This is where communication skills really do come into play in trying to persuade the owner to do the right thing (whether that is to PTS an animal when the time had already come, or to look into other options).

    It's a difficult situation though - if someone is adamant that they want an animal euthanising and you refuse (and don't point them to someone who will), what if they take matters into their own hands? ie try to kill the animal in a more cruel way. Would the vet who refused euthanasia be responsible?
    It would outrageous if the vet was liable for a psycho killing their animal. The vet wouldn't be liable imo
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    It would outrageous if the vet was liable for a psycho killing their animal. The vet wouldn't be liable imo
    Not liable in any legal sense, but ethically euthanasia by you is probably better than by the owner.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Louiseee_)
    okay so this a deep topic but we ended up discussing it in our practical today & its a Thursday night so I really CBA trawling through the RCVS "rules" to see if this is true.
    Basically I've heard lots of stories of vets refusing to do euthanasias & our clinician (who is a vet) said that if a dog is rehomable & healthy there is no legal issue in refusing to do a euthanasia. However, a girl in my group was ADAMANT that this is not true and if an owner wants a dog putting down, even if it's healthy & has no behavioural issues, we would have to do it BY LAW. as far as I'm aware that doesn't sound right, but I didn't know if anyone knew a bit more about it (mainly so i can prove this girl wrong should it come up again, but it's also a really important thing that I'll have to know in future)
    A vet can refuse euthanasia but must offer an alternative to the owner if they choose to refuse


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Community Assistant
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Lizziefickling)
    A vet can refuse euthanasia but must offer an alternative to the owner if they choose to refuse


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    What counts as an alternative? Would that be re homing or directing them to another vet?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Louiseee_)
    But you don't have to give them the contact details of someone who will?
    How would that be possible? If Vet A is the first to examine the animal and refuses to euthanize, how can he or she predict what Vet B (who has not examined the animal) will say about the case?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Louiseee_)
    What counts as an alternative? Would that be re homing or directing them to another vet?
    Rehoming, other treatment options etc or see another vet. That's what we've been taught in professional skills anyway


    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
Poll
Favourite type of bread

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.