Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

How to tell if you would be good at Maths? watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    How to know whether you have the potential to be good at Maths?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AQuestion1)
    How to know whether you have the potential to be good at Maths?
    ???
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AQuestion1)
    How to know whether you have the potential to be good at Maths?
    I guess before that you need to have faith in your ability. The fact that you are asking this question suggests otherwise but I'm sure you are just one of the people who hasn't found himself. Maybe TeeEm would be able to help you with that since I don't have experience to say anything on the matter.
    Good luck!
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AQuestion1)
    How to know whether you have the potential to be good at Maths?
    Maths at what level?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AQuestion1)
    How to know whether you have the potential to be good at Maths?
    Your interest and passion for the subject: everyone that likes the field would study extremely hard for it even if they have no potential, to the point they are deemed talented.

    Stephen Smale is a very good example (read his biography on Wikipedia).
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AQuestion1)
    How to know whether you have the potential to be good at Maths?
    The question you should be asking is how much time you expect to put into the subject. The more you practice, the better you get :P
    Online

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Anyone with average intelligence can do well at GCSE maths if they had the interest. If you're talking about a maths proligy, then, I'd say someone very smart who has also has a strong interest in maths.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeeEm)
    Maths at what level?
    University.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AQuestion1)
    University.
    If you are a first Year you are experience what practically every conscientious student experiences. (I went through that too)

    Most people hit a minimum around end of November.
    It is too early to tell if you have it or not, and also it depends on your own standards and goals.
    Do not give up mentally because regardless of ability it will be all over.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeeEm)
    If you are a first Year you are experience what practically every conscientious student experiences. (I went through that too)

    Most people hit a minimum around end of November.
    It is too early to tell if you have it or not, and also it depends on your own standards and goals.
    Do not give up mentally because regardless of ability it will be all over.
    Why did you decide to study Maths?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AQuestion1)
    Why did you decide to study Maths?
    Longish story but I will try to inspire you if you are feeling doubts.

    my degree started in 1984.

    I started with Maths and Computer science because my peers and family "strongly" advised me.

    After 3 weeks I switched to straight maths (I could not stand computing)

    After the first year I switched to Maths with Theoretical Physics (The first year was identical for both degrees) because I did not enjoy Pure maths.

    I felt extremely depressed during the first Year first term, thinking everybody else was better than me ... Things clicked during exam leave in the first year (very long exam leave in UCL in those days).
    Applied courses I understood well by then.
    For the Pure courses I memorized 100+ theorems/proofs and results.

    in the second year I came first in the department (I got the Andrew Rosen Prize or something like that)

    My three Year weighted average was exactly 90% on graduation.

    I can assure you at degree level I consider myself mathematically average however my productivity/motivation is very high.

    As I said the shock at the start of a Mathematics degree is very common. I warn my own students about it so they can deal better with it when/if it comes.

    All the best.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeeEm)
    I warn my own students about it so they can deal better with it when/if it comes.

    All the best.
    Are you a high school maths teacher? PS you were so lucky uni was free back in your days!
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    Are you a high school maths teacher? PS you were so lucky uni was free back in your days!
    very lucky indeed!!!
    We even used to get a grants, to help with living costs even though we lived at home...

    (PS not a high-school teacher. Private teacher and former lecturer among some of my previous jobs)
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    actually yeah, my teacher said that even if you get an A* in gcse maths, you could get a U at A level
    why???
    what's so different?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Everyone has the potential to be good or even outstanding in Mathematics but Maths is a skill and you need to put the work into it to be good at it. Just like any other skill.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by defenestrated)
    actually yeah, my teacher said that even if you get an A* in gcse maths, you could get a U at A level
    why???
    what's so different?
    GCSE: Spell "23" in words

    A-level: Find the centre of mass of a cone from its base, using calculus

    CIE IGCSE Additional Maths, on the other hand, is another story

    (Original post by British Jesus)
    Everyone has the potential to be good or even outstanding in Mathematics but Maths is a skill and you need to put the work into it to be good at it. Just like any other skill.
    Not everyone...
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by British Jesus)
    Everyone has the potential to be good or even outstanding in Mathematics but Maths is a skill and you need to put the work into it to be good at it. Just like any other skill.
    Not everyone.
    but a high proportion of failures is simply lack of work and motivation
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AQuestion1)
    How to know whether you have the potential to be good at Maths?
    It depends but i guess peopke with deep interest tends to di well. By intuition you can tell (not always)whether the person has a flair for math.
    But maths ability is also sonething by birth. Can you expect all thirteen year ilds to win in the imo.i doubt it.
    Checj about this guy. Hes pretty much the type i would cobsider "genius by birth"Arran Fernandez
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by defenestrated)
    actually yeah, my teacher said that even if you get an A* in gcse maths, you could get a U at A level
    why???
    what's so different?
    Maths really starts at A level but it begins its glory at degree level
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by defenestrated)
    actually yeah, my teacher said that even if you get an A* in gcse maths, you could get a U at A level
    why???
    what's so different?
    Most of GCSE maths is pretty obvious stuff that you can pick up by just attending lessons. A Level gets into more conceptually challenging topics, plus it demands far more in terms of algebraic manipulations.
    But that's not to say A Level is all that hard. I suspect GCSE success probably is more closely correlated with ability than A Level success. I have a friend who did better than me in UKMT SMC and some kind of IQ-test style mathematical thing we did a long time ago and he got a U in A level while I got an A*. Simply because I worked hard on maths and he did nothing. At GCSE any student with some mathematical inclination can hardly fail to do decently.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: November 3, 2015
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.