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Portugal's anti-euro Left banned from power after winning the election watch

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    Portugal has entered dangerous political waters. For the first time since the creation of Europe’s monetary union, a member state has taken the explicit step of forbidding eurosceptic parties from taking office on the grounds of national interest.

    Anibal Cavaco Silva, Portugal’s constitutional president, has refused to appoint a Left-wing coalition government even though it secured an absolute majority in the Portuguese parliament and won a mandate to smash the austerity regime bequeathed by the EU-IMF Troika.

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    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/e...rom-power.html
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    This was the decision of the Portugeuse President, and nothing to do with the EU. The President is putting his personal beliefs ahead of the political realities of the election.

    Blame him - not the EU.
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    Typical really
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    (Original post by gladders)
    This was the decision of the Portugeuse President, and nothing to do with the EU. The President is putting his personal beliefs ahead of the political realities of the election.

    Blame him - not the EU.
    'Nothing to do with the EU'. Like we're supposed to believe that. I'm not even left wing, but this is disgraceful. It's like the Queen not signing in our Prime Minister.
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    No, this is what happens when you have a partisan president instead of a monarch. President Silva is of the same political party as conservative Prime Minister Coelho.

    What you and the Telegraph have glossed over is that Coelho is the incumbent, his party won the most seats, and the left-wing coalition looks an unstable prospect, although they agreed terms to take to Silva.

    The Socialists and their allies plan to call a motion of no confidence in Coelho's minority in the shortest order, whereafter Silva will not be able to ignore the will of the Portuguese people.

    No doubt Silva is concerned about the impact of a potential withdrawal from the EU on Portugal, which is by all accounts a poor country.

    However this has nothing to do with rhe Portuguese "voting to smash Troika austerity" or however the Telegraph have phrased it. Neither the conservative coalition nor the Socialists want to leave the euro: only the Left Bloc and the Communists do.

    They represent 18% of the vote, or 36 of 230 seats. The conservatives and socialists represent 69% or 188 seats.

    No matter how much the anti-EU brigade try to paint this as a Podemos/Syriza-style breakthrough, it is not.
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    (Original post by richpanda)
    'Nothing to do with the EU'. Like we're supposed to believe that. I'm not even left wing, but this is disgraceful. It's like the Queen not signing in our Prime Minister.
    Replace the EU with Scottish independence (similarly unthinkable for our head of state) and you have the precise analogue of what was expected at our election in May. A unionist right-wing Conservative-Liberal coalition versus a coalition of unionist Labour and secessionist SNP.

    Now, I'd have expected the Queen would accept the Labour-SNP coalition. This shows why it is better to have a non-partisan monarchical head of state rather than a president. They do not wish to be seen to overreach, they have no party loyalties.
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    (Original post by richpanda)
    'Nothing to do with the EU'. Like we're supposed to believe that. I'm not even left wing, but this is disgraceful. It's like the Queen not signing in our Prime Minister.
    Well like it or not, it's nothing to do with the EU. The Portugeuse President made a politicised decision.
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    This article is quite illuminating:

    Elections in Portugal were held on October 4. The ruling coalition, led by the PSD’s Pedro Passos Coelho, lost its overall majority in the 230-seat Parliament, but remained the largest single party with 107 seats. It is also, whisper it quietly, a stable 107 seats. The centre-left won 122 seats, made up by the PS on 86, the Left Block or BE on 19, and the mainly Communist “Democratic Unity Coalition” with 17.

    However, and here we encounter a significantly sized however, there is a good reason there are three centre-left factions in Portugal, going all the way back to the aftermath of the “Carnation Revolution” of 1974 that ended the dictatorship of the Novo Estado. And there has been considerable bad blood between the three groups, with the PS suggesting they might even work with the PSD to form a grand coalition.

    After two and a half weeks had passed with no Government in place, Portugal’s President Anibal Cavaco Silva has invited Passos Coelho to continue as Prime Minister. He has ten days to put his party’s programme to Parliament and pass a budget - something that is now more than a week overdue. Should the new Government’s budget be voted down, the most likely outcome is that PS leader António Costa will have a go.

    This has been spun by Evans Pritchard as “For the first time since the creation of Europe’s monetary union, a member state has taken the explicit step of forbidding eurosceptic parties from taking office on the grounds of national interest … [Cavaco Silva] has refused to appoint a Left-wing coalition government even though it secured an absolute majority in the Portuguese parliament and won a mandate to smash the austerity regime”.

    But there was not yet a coalition in place, although the centre-left parties had indicated they would work together. Evans Pritchard justifies his line with “He deemed it too risky to let the Left Bloc or the Communists come close to power, insisting that conservatives should soldier on as a minority in order to satisfy Brussels and appease foreign financial markets”. The overdue budget is for some reason not mentioned.

    Of course, Cavaco Silva’s words could also be interpreted as a concern that a PS-BE-CDU coalition would lack stability, but that would not satisfy Evans Pritchard’s desire to paint this as the Brussels bogeyman telling everyone else what to do. It is also possible that Cavaco Silva is siding with his own party (the PSD) and leaving the difficult decisions to the next President of Portugal, who will be elected next year. And won’t be him.

    Whatever the reasons for Cavaco Silva’s decision, the reality is all to do with Portugal’s internal politics, than anything coming out of Brussels. And now that the Portuguese Parliament has elected Eduardo Ferro Rodrigues of the PS as its Speaker, there is plenty of scope for more fun and games in the coming days. Also remember that the PS formed a minority Government in 2009 with only 97 seats, which served for two years.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    Replace the EU with Scottish independence (similarly unthinkable for our head of state) and you have the precise analogue of what was expected at our election in May. A unionist right-wing Conservative-Liberal coalition versus a coalition of unionist Labour and secessionist SNP.

    Now, I'd have expected the Queen would accept the Labour-SNP coalition. This shows why it is better to have a non-partisan monarchical head of state rather than a president. They do not wish to be seen to overreach, they have no party loyalties.
    We were in exactly the same position after the December 1923 election. Baldwin stayed on, met Parliament in January 1924, was defeated on a vote of confidence and resigned.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    We were in exactly the same position after the December 1923 election. Baldwin stayed on, met Parliament in January 1924, was defeated on a vote of confidence and resigned.
    Which presumably is the kind of calculation the Queen would make. Silva however is partisan and thus may cost the country time, money, unity, trust and good governance by forcing the lefties to eject Coelho in Parliament. The outcome is the same; the point is the monarch can choose whether it is arrived at by democratic legitimacy or expedient royal prerogative. The President is bound to do what favours his party.
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    (Original post by Dumachi)
    Portugal has entered dangerous political waters. For the first time since the creation of Europe’s monetary union, a member state has taken the explicit step of forbidding eurosceptic parties from taking office on the grounds of national interest.

    Anibal Cavaco Silva, Portugal’s constitutional president, has refused to appoint a Left-wing coalition government even though it secured an absolute majority in the Portuguese parliament and won a mandate to smash the austerity regime bequeathed by the EU-IMF Troika.

    Read More:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/11949701/AEP-Eurozone-crosses-Rubicon-as-Portugals-anti-euro-Left-banned-from-power.html
    Insane..... I thought Portugal was democratic. I guess this happened in Greece too, but in Greece it was the Germans who said no to an election.
 
 
 
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