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    How do you feel Mechanics modules above and including M3 (if you took them) helped you on your uni course? Did you find having taken them useful, or did you learn everything in uni anyway? Or did it just make your course material easier to understand?

    Please share you experience!
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    (Original post by Student403)
    How do you feel Mechanics modules above and including M3 (if you took them) helped you on your uni course? Did you find having taken them useful, or did you learn everything in uni anyway? Or did it just make your course material easier to understand?

    Please share you experience!
    I only did up to M3, but I looked at the content in M4 and M5 and even learnt some of the stuff. The content is M3-M5 will help you a lot in the mechanics stuff like statics and dynamics. The other day my lecturer literally spent less than 2 mins explaining how to find the centre of mass (1st moment of inertia) and I'm pretty sure most people in the lecture didnt understand it, apart from those who took M3 (even still they might not get it because the lecturer kept saying '1st moment of inertia' when we are used to calling it 'centre of mass').In that same lecture we also did Parralel axis theorem, again this is in M5 but lecture covered it quite fast. Lectures arent places you go to learn, you pretty much go there to find out what to learn then you can learn it at your own pace at home. But if you are having to relearn stuff for all your modules then the work will be tedious however if you took M3-M5 say, then chances are you wont have to spend as much time learning what centre of mass is etc compared to most people, which means you can have free time or study other modules. Saying this, this only applies to the solid mechanics stuff which is 1/6 modules for me. In others like thermodynamics, further pure stuff is useful, integrals, taylors series, differentiation, vectors etc. So I'd say taking a balance of pure and mechanics will be more useful. But then again if you are taking M5, chances are you will take FP3 too so you should be fine
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    I only did up to M3, but I looked at the content in M4 and M5 and even learnt some of the stuff. The content is M3-M5 will help you a lot in the mechanics stuff like statics and dynamics. The other day my lecturer literally spent less than 2 mins explaining how to find the centre of mass (1st moment of inertia) and I'm pretty sure most people in the lecture didnt understand it, apart from those who took M3 (even still they might not get it because the lecturer kept saying '1st moment of inertia' when we are used to calling it 'centre of mass'. In that same lecture we also did Parralel axis theorem, again this is in M5 but lecture covered it quite fast. Lectures arent places you go to learn, you pretty much go there to find out what to learn then you can learn it at your own pace at home. But if you are having to relearn stuff for all your modules then the work will be tedious however if you took M3-M5 say, then chances are you wont have to spend as much time learning what centre of mass is etc compared to most people, which means you can have free time or study other modules. Saying this, this only applies to the solid mechanics stuff which is 1/6 modules for me. In others like thermodynamics, further pure stuff is useful, integrals, taylors series, differentiation, vectors etc. So I'd say taking a balance of pure and mechanics will be more useful. But then again if you are taking M5, chances are you will take FP3 too so you should be fine
    Thanks so much for your answer :-) If I may ask, which branch of engineering are you doing?
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Thanks so much for your answer :-) If I may ask, which branch of engineering are you doing?
    Aerospace (1st year)

    edit: but 5/6 modules is the same as mechanical engineering
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    Aerospace

    edit: but 5/6 modules is the same as mechanical engineering
    Ooooooh!!!!! I'm going for aerospace too!!!
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    I only did up to M3, but I looked at the content in M4 and M5 and even learnt some of the stuff. The content is M3-M5 will help you a lot in the mechanics stuff like statics and dynamics. The other day my lecturer literally spent less than 2 mins explaining how to find the centre of mass (1st moment of inertia) and I'm pretty sure most people in the lecture didnt understand it, apart from those who took M3 (even still they might not get it because the lecturer kept saying '1st moment of inertia' when we are used to calling it 'centre of mass').In that same lecture we also did Parralel axis theorem, again this is in M5 but lecture covered it quite fast. Lectures arent places you go to learn, you pretty much go there to find out what to learn then you can learn it at your own pace at home. But if you are having to relearn stuff for all your modules then the work will be tedious however if you took M3-M5 say, then chances are you wont have to spend as much time learning what centre of mass is etc compared to most people, which means you can have free time or study other modules. Saying this, this only applies to the solid mechanics stuff which is 1/6 modules for me. In others like thermodynamics, further pure stuff is useful, integrals, taylors series, differentiation, vectors etc. So I'd say taking a balance of pure and mechanics will be more useful. But then again if you are taking M5, chances are you will take FP3 too so you should be fine
    Hey, that was helpful. Do you happen to know how much this applies to civil engineering?
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    (Original post by theonetruequeen)
    Hey, that was helpful. Do you happen to know how much this applies to civil engineering?
    So mechanics can be put in 3 parts, statics, dynamics, and materials. In my uni, Civil Engineers take all the statics courses to S1, S2, S3 where as mech/aero do a bit of statics, some dynamics and materials. Civil engineers do crap loads of statics because they mainly concern with things that aren't meant to move like buildings, bridges etc. In terms of alevel modules, Mechanics one are most helpful. But then again civil engineers will take thermodynamics like everyone else in first year so its good to know some pure stuff, such as differential equations and taylors series. Make sure you can solve differential equations 1st and 2nd order before you start uni. Differentiation and integration is a must thing you need to be perfect at for any engineering discipline
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    So mechanics can be put in 3 parts, statics, dynamics, and materials. In my uni, Civil Engineers take all the statics courses to S1, S2, S3 where as mech/aero do a bit of statics, some dynamics and materials. Civil engineers do crap loads of statics because they mainly concern with things that aren't meant to move like buildings, bridges etc. In terms of alevel modules, Mechanics one are most helpful. But then again civil engineers will take thermodynamics like everyone else in first year so its good to know some pure stuff, such as differential equations and taylors series. Make sure you can solve differential equations 1st and 2nd order before you start uni. Differentiation and integration is a must thing you need to be perfect at for any engineering discipline
    Hey so as an aspiring Aero engineer, I'll finish school with C1-4, Fp1-3, S1/2, M1-3 + D1.

    I was thinking of self studying M4 (M5 maybe?) during the summer to get a good start on my uni course and make things easier. Do you think that's a good idea or is it me just doing something completely unnecessary?
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    So mechanics can be put in 3 parts, statics, dynamics, and materials. In my uni, Civil Engineers take all the statics courses to S1, S2, S3 where as mech/aero do a bit of statics, some dynamics and materials. Civil engineers do crap loads of statics because they mainly concern with things that aren't meant to move like buildings, bridges etc. In terms of alevel modules, Mechanics one are most helpful. But then again civil engineers will take thermodynamics like everyone else in first year so its good to know some pure stuff, such as differential equations and taylors series. Make sure you can solve differential equations 1st and 2nd order before you start uni. Differentiation and integration is a must thing you need to be perfect at for any engineering discipline
    Thank you! That helped, again I really don't want to be unprepared for uni!

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    (Original post by Student403)
    Hey so as an aspiring Aero engineer, I'll finish school with C1-4, Fp1-3, S1/2, M1-3 + D1.

    I was thinking of self studying M4 (M5 maybe?) during the summer to get a good start on my uni course and make things easier. Do you think that's a good idea or is it me just doing something completely unnecessary?
    Most people say you should usually chill in the summer and thats true for the most part, but I'd say if you want to look at m4 and 5 just briefly, dont spend your summer doing work! The first few weeks of uni you will feel like everything is going at a stupidly fast rate, and thats true. but after about 6 weeks you will get the hang of it. Its good you're doing fp3, the maths module will be a walk in the park. Most topics in the mechanics module are good to know but dont duel on stuff like simple harmonic motion. but M3 + Fp3 knoledge alone is pretty solid to start uni, but if you get too bored in the summer then look into m4/5.
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    Most people say you should usually chill in the summer and thats true for the most part, but I'd say if you want to look at m4 and 5 just briefly, dont spend your summer doing work! The first few weeks of uni you will feel like everything is going at a stupidly fast rate, and thats true. but after about 6 weeks you will get the hang of it. Its good you're doing fp3, the maths module will be a walk in the park. Most topics in the mechanics module are good to know but dont duel on stuff like simple harmonic motion. but M3 + Fp3 knoledge alone is pretty solid to start uni, but if you get too bored in the summer then look into m4/5.
    Cheers man Going off on a tangent, how are you finding the aerospace course?
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Cheers man Going off on a tangent, how are you finding the aerospace course?
    ******* hard!

    haha just kidding. Depending on what uni you go to, you actually wont do any aerospace related stuff in yr 1, you will just be doing the foundation of engineering so maths, thermo, mechanics etc. I happen to have one module which is just about aircrafts and its pretty interesting! The rest of the modules actually arent that hard, but during the few weeks there were some points where I wish I did a different course because I didn't get any of the lectures. But what I've begun doing is just typing in the same of the topic into youtube, there are so many easier explanation of things! so now I actually get what I'm learning. Sometimes you come out of a lecture knowing less than you went in its hard but doable,
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    ******* hard!

    haha just kidding. Depending on what uni you go to, you actually wont do any aerospace related stuff in yr 1, you will just be doing the foundation of engineering so maths, thermo, mechanics etc. I happen to have one module which is just about aircrafts and its pretty interesting! The rest of the modules actually arent that hard, but during the few weeks there were some points where I wish I did a different course because I didn't get any of the lectures. But what I've begun doing is just typing in the same of the topic into youtube, there are so many easier explanation of things! so now I actually get what I'm learning. Sometimes you come out of a lecture knowing less than you went in its hard but doable,
    Oh that's interesting, then! Yeah for Cambridge years 1 AND 2 are generalised. Not sure about the others, though. It really interests me though so hopefully that'll keep me going. Good luck in yours!
 
 
 
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