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Computer Science vs Economics vs Engineering watch

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    Hello students

    I came over from Malta about 1.5 years ago, and in the past year or two, I have been struggling with what to study

    Some background :I was deciding between Computer Science, Economics and Engineering.
    I done A-level equivlents in Malta, in Pure Mathematics, English, Economics, Music and Chemistry.

    My average grade was a B. (I am not a smart person but I hope to improve.) So I have been given a choice to study Economics year 1, Computer Science with foundation or Engineering with foundation at an English university.

    Please note that if I do go for computer science or engineering this year I will have missed sixth weeks of study (my admissions took long) but the economics I have already covered in my previous year (overlap).

    I don't know if it's worth to pay extra money and time for an extra year in foundation for computer science or engineering, or just go into economics?

    I have no background in engineering or computer science, and I have to make decision by tomorrow. I feel confused about this all.
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    dear forum users, I would be grateful if any of you could provide me some information or insight into this matter, as I need to confirm my decision this coming week.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    Hello students

    I came over from Malta about 1.5 years ago, and in the past year or two, I have been struggling with what to study

    Some background :I was deciding between Computer Science, Economics and Engineering.
    I done A-level equivlents in Malta, in Pure Mathematics, English, Economics, Music and Chemistry.

    My average grade was a B. (I am not a smart person but I hope to improve.) So I have been given a choice to study Economics year 1, Computer Science with foundation or Engineering with foundation at an English university.

    Please note that if I do go for computer science or engineering this year I will have missed sixth weeks of study (my admissions took long) but the economics I have already covered in my previous year (overlap).

    I don't know if it's worth to pay extra money and time for an extra year in foundation for computer science or engineering, or just go into economics?

    I have no background in engineering or computer science, and I have to make decision by tomorrow. I feel confused about this all.
    Economics is just bad maths; it's for the semi-intelligent.

    Engineering or computer science it is, and I would recommend CompSci in every respect.
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    dear forum users, I would be grateful if any of you could provide me some information or insight into this matter, as I need to confirm my decision this coming week.

    Thanks
    Only study engineering if you want to become an engineer, or at least consider it a strong possibility.
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    (Original post by multiratiunculae)
    Economics is just bad maths; it's for the semi-intelligent.

    Engineering or computer science it is, and I would recommend CompSci in every respect.
    Thanks for your input. Just issue that I heard that many engineers go into financial jobs/unrelated fields, but still make use of there problem solving abilities, but why 4 years to study then not go into that field?

    And with computer science I have no idea of what it is, some persons say it is interesting, others say it is boring/just sitting on computer coding?

    I would like to be honest and say I don't know which one to choose, as I have no inclination particular to any of these subjects. makes it difficult to choose.
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    (Original post by multiratiunculae)
    Economics is just bad maths; it's for the semi-intelligent.

    Engineering or computer science it is, and I would recommend CompSci in every respect.
    Also I saw from research that Economics is more competitive than engineering and computer science in UK and that some universities recommend the extra math unit called further maths? so it must be some degree of difficulty then, yes?
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    Thanks for your input. Just issue that I heard that many engineers go into financial jobs/unrelated fields, but still make use of there problem solving abilities, but why 4 years to study then not go into that field?

    And with computer science I have no idea of what it is, some persons say it is interesting, others say it is boring/just sitting on computer coding?

    I would like to be honest and say I don't know which one to choose, as I have no inclination particular to any of these subjects. makes it difficult to choose.
    I really wouldn't recommend economics unless you aren't fond of mathematics (which obviously you are given your other two career ambitions). How about considering different branches of engineering; there are many different branches and you might find a passion for a particular branch such as electronic engineering or civil or etc engineering.
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    Thanks for your input. Just issue that I heard that many engineers go into financial jobs/unrelated fields, but still make use of there problem solving abilities, but why 4 years to study then not go into that field?

    And with computer science I have no idea of what it is, some persons say it is interesting, others say it is boring/just sitting on computer coding?

    I would like to be honest and say I don't know which one to choose, as I have no inclination particular to any of these subjects. makes it difficult to choose.
    There is only Iike 1 module in computer science that focuses on coding; the coding heavy course is Software Engineering.

    1 year is dedicated to (if you're not doing an MSc) a year in industry which will give you a boost ahead of other Graduates who haven't had work experience in the field.

    If you have no interest in computer science (it seems so) don't go for it. Don't think you should go for.engineering since you think "it's a waste of money". Perhaps go for economics since you seem to know what they're teaching and I'm hoping you enjoy it too.

    Comp Sci for the win forever and always though
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Only study engineering if you want to become an engineer, or at least consider it a strong possibility.
    Thank you for your input. dilemma is due to that I have just done academic study like a sheep, I have not realised where I want to be or study. But I want to study something that is broad, but still within a certain range so that in 5 years time or whenever, I feel that I have chance to go into as many options (I think its called keep the doors of opportunity open).

    Thank you
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    Thank you for your input. dilemma is due to that I have just done academic study like a sheep, I have not realised where I want to be or study. But I want to study something that is broad, but still within a certain range so that in 5 years time or whenever, I feel that I have chance to go into as many options (I think its called keep the doors of opportunity open).

    Thank you
    Maybe better to take a year out and make a more informed decision next year.
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    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    There is only Iike 1 module in computer science that focuses on coding; the coding heavy course is Software Engineering.

    1 year is dedicated to (if you're not doing an MSc) a year in industry which will give you a boost ahead of other Graduates who haven't had work experience in the field.

    If you have no interest in computer science (it seems so) don't go for it. Don't think you should go for.engineering since you think "it's a waste of money". Perhaps go for economics since you seem to know what they're teaching and I'm hoping you enjoy it too.

    Comp Sci for the win forever and always though
    I see what you mean, and I said it is waste of money in that I have to do an extra year and same for computer science. I have no particular choice against any of the 3, but I have limited information of computer science and engineering . May I want to ask you, is computer science like logical thinking and problem solving, instead of lots of learning computer languages?

    How do i explain it? Well when I read about a certain problem, like how many ways can you arrange a sequence of numbers, I understand, but I hate learning new computer language like c++ or what it is called. I just seem to like solving problems I can think of in real life and in my mind.
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    (Original post by multiratiunculae)
    I really wouldn't recommend economics unless you aren't fond of mathematics (which obviously you are given your other two career ambitions). How about considering different branches of engineering; there are many different branches and you might find a passion for a particular branch such as electronic engineering or civil or etc engineering.
    How do you think I would cope in either engineering or computer science taking note that I have no background or experience in them?

    Thank you
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    Computer Science and Engineering>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Eco nomics.
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    Also I saw from research that Economics is more competitive than engineering and computer science in UK and that some universities recommend the extra math unit called further maths? so it must be some degree of difficulty then, yes?
    It is highly competitive because it's for the semi-intelligent and it pays well, but the market is saturated with these annoying semi-intellectuals. An engineer contributes in all walks of life, a computer scientist is also a highly employable man.

    Don't bother with a gap year; research branches of engineering and pick one you like.
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    Don't buy into the myth that there is a shortage of programmers, engineers and economists. Each and every year there are far more graduates in all those disciplines than there are job vacancies, so choose the degree which you think you will enjoy the most.
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    How do you think I would cope in either engineering or computer science taking note that I have no background or experience in them?

    Thank you
    no one has any background going into the course; the only necessary background is mathematics. If you are able to do a level maths by the time you start the course, you will have no problems.
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    (Original post by multiratiunculae)
    It is highly competitive because it's for the semi-intelligent and it pays well, but the market is saturated with these annoying semi-intellectuals. An engineer contributes in all walks of life, a computer scientist is also a highly employable man.

    Don't bother with a gap year; research branches of engineering and pick one you like.
    You see I would like to follow what you say because I agree wasting an year is not great because I know I will fall into same dilemma, maybe more experience but still similar.

    However, the only reason I feel like going into something difficult like engineering or computer science is that I want to feel smart and feel like I studied hard in my 4 years. I dont feel any other purpose.

    if anyone else wants to comment on this feeling and view of mine, please do as I am not sure if it is correct. (I may be being a bit foolish)
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    (Original post by carlos10000)
    Don't buy into the myth that there is a shortage of programmers, engineers and economists. Each and every year there are far more graduates in all those disciplines than there are job vacancies, so choose the degree which you think you will enjoy the most.
    There isn't a shortage of programmers, there is a shortage of GOOD programmers. That is not a myth.
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    (Original post by carlos10000)
    Don't buy into the myth that there is a shortage of programmers, engineers and economists. Each and every year there are far more graduates in all those disciplines than there are job vacancies, so choose the degree which you think you will enjoy the most.
    thanks for your input. do you advise going into what I have confidence in succeeding in, and not risk going into a new field I may/may not like? and trying my best to get good grades?

    Thank you
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    (Original post by Computer Geek)
    There isn't a shortage of programmers, there is a shortage of GOOD programmers. That is not a myth.
    hello , I saw your post and as you seem to be in the computer science field, what would you advise? How can i know if this field interests me?

    I will be not available to get loans and have saved up to pay it myself, so risking my savinngs,
 
 
 
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