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Frankenstein essay watch

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    I'm doing an essay on the 'Dangerous knowledge' theme in Frankenstein. However, I'm having problems with coming up with the points. I happen to do very "simplistic" points -> comments I got from my previous essay so I need to make sure I come up with more intelligent? (I can't think of the word) points. I have the contextual research and quotes ready, I just need help with coming up with points.
    Thank you : ) =D ;D
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    (Original post by Kokoloco)
    I'm doing an essay on the 'Dangerous knowledge' theme in Frankenstein. However, I'm having problems with coming up with the points. I happen to do very "simplistic" points -> comments I got from my previous essay so I need to make sure I come up with more intelligent? (I can't think of the word) points. I have the contextual research and quotes ready, I just need help with coming up with points.
    Thank you : ) =D ;D
    What's the actual title called though? That would actually help. You could discuss a theme in relation to characters, setting, plot, or theme within itself. Need the full essay title to establish what points you can write about.
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    What's the actual title called though? That would actually help. You could discuss a theme in relation to characters, setting, plot, or theme within itself. Need the full essay title to establish what points you can write about.
    The title of the essay is 'How does Shelley explore the theme of dangerous knowledge in Volume One?'
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    (Original post by Kokoloco)
    I'm doing an essay on the 'Dangerous knowledge' theme in Frankenstein. However, I'm having problems with coming up with the points. I happen to do very "simplistic" points -> comments I got from my previous essay so I need to make sure I come up with more intelligent? (I can't think of the word) points. I have the contextual research and quotes ready, I just need help with coming up with points.
    Thank you : ) =D ;D
    Hi,

    Having successfully handled multiple papers on Frankenstein, I consider myself an authority on Frankenstein.
    I can offer you a perfect paper.
    Just confirm your interest.
    Thanks.
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    (Original post by platolover)
    Hi,

    Having successfully handled multiple papers on Frankenstein, I consider myself an authority on Frankenstein.
    I can offer you a perfect paper.
    Just confirm your interest.
    Thanks.
    Thank you so very much, however I chose A level English Lit because I wanted to do it. I wasn't asking for a already made essay, just a few pointers. I would very much like to do it on my own. I actually seem to weirdly enjoy writing essays #Nerd4Lyfe. I cant hand in something that doesn't belong to me, I just can't. But thank you, I do appreciate it.
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    (Original post by Kokoloco)
    I'm doing an essay on the 'Dangerous knowledge' theme in Frankenstein. However, I'm having problems with coming up with the points. I happen to do very "simplistic" points -> comments I got from my previous essay so I need to make sure I come up with more intelligent? (I can't think of the word) points. I have the contextual research and quotes ready, I just need help with coming up with points.
    Thank you : ) =D ;D
    'How does Shelley explore the theme of dangerous knowledge in Volume One?'

    I'm going to write whatever comes to my head, and hopefully they'll help you write your essay and develop your own response!

    In your introduction, you can talk about some historical and literary context. Shelley's text can be seen as a warning of the dangers of knowledge, allegorical in that sense. Frankenstein's story is Walton's hypothetical future, and Walton turns back. But can't this be seen as a failure, is the danger of knowledge an obstacle to greatness ? One thing that strikes me when reading the text is it's ambiguity, it blurs good and evil, who is the monster?

    In Frankenstein, Shelley explores the theme of dangerous knowledge by incorporating elements from the story of Genesis and Paradise Lost into her texts. This brings up ideas relating the idea of original sin etc. where Adam and Eve broke God's command by eating from the tree of knowledge, resulting in the Fall of Eden. The Romantics were largely focused on the natural world, and this is something Shelley twists at the beginning of her texts with Walton's fascination of the Arctic, almost a fascination of what is barren, like a ruined Eden.

    You can also talk about the text from feminist perspectives. Frankenstein's 'pursuit' of knowledge is described as 'following nature to her hiding places', nature is personified as a female. The focus of nature is typical of romanticism, but Frankensteins pursuit can be argued to almost be like rape, and it presents the natural world as threat, as if this knowledge is breaking natural and physical laws. Furthermore, in his creation of the monster, Frankenstein not only rids the need for a God but also women, they are no longer needed to bear children.

    You can talk about the layered narrative structure, framed within Walton's epistolary form. In a way, this form is like the monster, separate parts which refuse to go together to form an acceptable full form, it merely functions. In this way, the form itself portrays the danger of too much knowledge, the final creation is remarkable, but terrifying.

    Sorry if there are any grammatical errors etc.. I just wrote what came to my head !

    It's a great text! I found it dull but analysing really livened it up!
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    (Original post by Kokoloco)
    Thank you so very much, however I chose A level English Lit because I wanted to do it. I wasn't asking for a already made essay, just a few pointers. I would very much like to do it on my own. I actually seem to weirdly enjoy writing essays #Nerd4Lyfe. I cant hand in something that doesn't belong to me, I just can't. But thank you, I do appreciate it.
    Okay, Response much appreciated.
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    (Original post by Big Blue Machine)
    'How does Shelley explore the theme of dangerous knowledge in Volume One?'

    I'm going to write whatever comes to my head, and hopefully they'll help you write your essay and develop your own response!

    In your introduction, you can talk about some historical and literary context. Shelley's text can be seen as a warning of the dangers of knowledge, allegorical in that sense. Frankenstein's story is Walton's hypothetical future, and Walton turns back. But can't this be seen as a failure, is the danger of knowledge an obstacle to greatness ? One thing that strikes me when reading the text is it's ambiguity, it blurs good and evil, who is the monster?

    In Frankenstein, Shelley explores the theme of dangerous knowledge by incorporating elements from the story of Genesis and Paradise Lost into her texts. This brings up ideas relating the idea of original sin etc. where Adam and Eve broke God's command by eating from the tree of knowledge, resulting in the Fall of Eden. The Romantics were largely focused on the natural world, and this is something Shelley twists at the beginning of her texts with Walton's fascination of the Arctic, almost a fascination of what is barren, like a ruined Eden.

    You can also talk about the text from feminist perspectives. Frankenstein's 'pursuit' of knowledge is described as 'following nature to her hiding places', nature is personified as a female. The focus of nature is typical of romanticism, but Frankensteins pursuit can be argued to almost be like rape, and it presents the natural world as threat, as if this knowledge is breaking natural and physical laws. Furthermore, in his creation of the monster, Frankenstein not only rids the need for a God but also women, they are no longer needed to bear children.

    You can talk about the layered narrative structure, framed within Walton's epistolary form. In a way, this form is like the monster, separate parts which refuse to go together to form an acceptable full form, it merely functions. In this way, the form itself portrays the danger of too much knowledge, the final creation is remarkable, but terrifying.

    Sorry if there are any grammatical errors etc.. I just wrote what came to my head !

    It's a great text! I found it dull but analysing really livened it up!
    OMGG you don't realise how much this helped me improve my essay. THANK YOU SOOOOOO MUCH! But I've already handed it in lmao. I've adjusted my essay so i mention these things and i'm soooo thankful even though I already turned it in it's still a great help.
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    (Original post by Kokoloco)
    OMGG you don't realise how much this helped me improve my essay. THANK YOU SOOOOOO MUCH! But I've already handed it in lmao. I've adjusted my essay so i mention these things and i'm soooo thankful even though I already turned it in it's still a great help.
    You're welcome send him/ her the new one on email if you want I always resend essays once I've updated them, and make the updates red.
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    (Original post by Big Blue Machine)
    You're welcome send him/ her the new one on email if you want I always resend essays once I've updated them, and make the updates red.
    Oooo good idea xD
 
 
 
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