Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello! I'm a 19-year-old American girl studying writing and I will be studying abroad in England in the near future. My general plan for after university is to move to England and attempt to break into the writing industry there, as I've always enjoyed British television and literature over American and I have no wish to live in LA, which is where I would probably have to go if I were to try to break into the screenwriting industry here in America.

    However, my main worry is that people will not be receptive to an American writing for British outlets. I'm hoping that by studying in England and by proactively working to shape my writing so that it cannot be identified as an American writer's work I'll be able to overcome any barriers that might be placed in my way, but it does worry me. Especially since I've heard there is a stereotype that Americans don't understand irony, which I'm not sure is true.

    Thoughts? Excited to come over!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ThatWriterKid)
    Hello! I'm a 19-year-old American girl studying writing and I will be studying abroad in England in the near future. My general plan for after university is to move to England and attempt to break into the writing industry there, as I've always enjoyed British television and literature over American and I have no wish to live in LA, which is where I would probably have to go if I were to try to break into the screenwriting industry here in America.

    However, my main worry is that people will not be receptive to an American writing for British outlets. I'm hoping that by studying in England and by proactively working to shape my writing so that it cannot be identified as an American writer's work I'll be able to overcome any barriers that might be placed in my way, but it does worry me. Especially since I've heard there is a stereotype that Americans don't understand irony, which I'm not sure is true.

    Thoughts? Excited to come over!
    Hi pal

    Have you completed any screenplays yet? If so what are they about?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Id be devestated.
    Jk good luck matey
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I don't see any problem with it other than using our vocabulary, e.g. "rubbish" instead of "trash", "trousers" instead of "pants".
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TheWaffle)
    Hi pal

    Have you completed any screenplays yet? If so what are they about?
    I have a few ideas roaming around in my head, but nothing official yet.

    However, just to play around with the screenwriting format and British vocab, I have written a Sherlock special (1720 pirate Sherlock) and a Merlin Season 6.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by saeed97)
    Id be devestated.
    Jk good luck matey
    Thanks!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Armastan)
    I don't see any problem with it other than using our vocabulary, e.g. "rubbish" instead of "trash", "trousers" instead of "pants".
    Yes, definitely! My favorite is 'sorry?' instead of 'wait, what?'
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ThatWriterKid)
    I have a few ideas roaming around in my head, but nothing official yet.

    However, just to play around with the screenwriting format and British vocab, I have written a Sherlock special (1720 pirate Sherlock) and a Merlin Season 6.
    Oh right cool I would advise writing a short film script to begin with and then entering it into competitions. I think it's hard to fully know you want to be a screenwriter before you have actually written a completely original piece from scratch. In terms of the difference between US and UK writing, I feel like the US often has much simpler plots, characters and resolutions (well certainly Hollywood does).
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    It's good that people are exposed to different languages.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TheWaffle)
    Oh right cool I would advise writing a short film script to begin with and then entering it into competitions. I think it's hard to fully know you want to be a screenwriter before you have actually written a completely original piece from scratch. In terms of the difference between US and UK writing, I feel like the US often has much simpler plots, characters and resolutions (well certainly Hollywood does).
    Right that would be the next step for sure and one I certainly plan on doing. I wonder, do you think I could submit a screenplay to British competitions while I'm not a current resident of England? That'd be nice.

    I would agree on the Hollywood aspect. I'm not sure if that truly transfers to TV, but there are certainly differences, mostly in pacing I find. I think it'll be a bit of trial an error on my end to figure out what works best.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ThatWriterKid)
    Right that would be the next step for sure and one I certainly plan on doing. I wonder, do you think I could submit a screenplay to British competitions while I'm not a current resident of England? That'd be nice.

    I would agree on the Hollywood aspect. I'm not sure if that truly transfers to TV, but there are certainly differences, mostly in pacing I find. I think it'll be a bit of trial an error on my end to figure out what works best.
    I think it depends on each individual competition so I'd check the rules individually. Some have an international category as well as a UK one. I'm being mentored by a professional UK screenwriter at the moment and he said the key to writing for television is being able to structure plot really well. I know some good books on that if you want me to share them?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TheWaffle)
    I think it depends on each individual competition so I'd check the rules individually. Some have an international category as well as a UK one. I'm being mentored by a professional UK screenwriter at the moment and he said the key to writing for television is being able to structure plot really well. I know some good books on that if you want me to share them?
    Yes please!!! And thank you so much for your help! Tell your mentor I said thank you as well, you're so lucky.
 
 
 
Poll
Favourite type of bread
Useful resources

Quick Link:

Unanswered Marketing,Sales ad PR Threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.