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    Please help me answer these questions. For GCSE, I took Triple Science, Maths, English language, English lit, French, ICT, Art and History. I am a year 11 student right now (mocks are coming up which I have yet to revise for). I'm predicted several A's and and A*s perhaps like 2 B's if I fail the exam but coursework wise, I'm good. I'm a dedicated student who has good social skills don't worry and I really want to go to a Russel Group University so I'm taking 'facilitating subjects' I don't particularly like the 'soft' subjects anyways.

    I've researched for days guys. Below are the two subjects I know I'm taking and why but some questions with them.

    1. English Literature- With Full marks for Coursework at GCSE I really enjoy English and will probably take it for A level. How are the exams? Is the essay (the dissertation) hard or do you get any help?
    2. Maths- Though I don't enjoy it as much. I understand it and it's logical. I think I would be able to take the pressure. I know how hard it is but it's worth it. Is the exam style similar or are they completely different?

    Now I have no idea what else to take. Firstly, I have a passion for writing so I'm probably going to take an english lit degree but I still want to take a wide amount of options. I also change my mind a lot so I just want to have a backup, Unlike GCSE's where I took all coursework subjects which I now regret, I now want to take a balanced amount of coursework and exams.

    The subjects I'm interested in are:
    1. History- though I'm questioning if this is too similar to english literature. I'm already taking an essay subject. Is it worth taking another and adding more to my workload?
    2. Chemistry- Right now I don't get C7 and my teacher said that it is harder but much more rewarding. First off is this true? Secondly, I don't have much patience and have really bad concentration when I find something boring. Does chemistry get boring? How are the exams. However, I find chemistry interesting at times but boring at other times.
    3. Biology- Not bragging but I find Biology the easiest out of all the sciences. Is it just memorisation like in GCSE's? If so, is this A level more about understanding? Are the exams harder?

    Subjects I know for sure I'm not taking
    Business studies, psychology, sociology, dance, ICT, computer science and much more I can't remember

    I would be so thankful if someone answered these questions and also told me their experiences about these subjects
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    I don't know If im allowed to bump but ah well
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    (Original post by peanelope)
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    History and English is a good combination and will do you well for something like an English Literature type of degree. It does also mean you have a fairly nice split across arts and sciences as it appears your other two options are likely to be scientific.

    Maths is very easy to work at. The exams are basically the same every time and there are years and years of past papers. You can do well by just sheer attrition if you keep doing exercises and old questions. I found it was a fairly constant kind of subject too. I mean, sometimes some things are harder than others and require more work but generally speaking without coursework it means you tend not to get snowed under as long as you keep up with what's going on in class.

    As for chemistry I have no idea what C7 is so I can't link it to much. I sort of thought I might like chemistry in school but I really didn't enjoy it at all. It always seemed like a lot of isolated points to me and that was pretty dull. I took it at A-level because I loved biology and was told it would be a good idea to understand the underpinning factors of chemistry. Turns out I really enjoyed it at A-level because it was so logical and clicked for me instantly. The warning i'd have with it is it seems like people either "get it" or crash and burn somewhat. I think it is very rewarding and if you're willing to work for it if it doesn't come to you naturally then you will be okay, but if you're not that interested in it you're probably not going to make up that work. There's also the variation within the subject (inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry) which may mean you may find a particular module kind of boring or difficult, but then really enjoy others. Can make it hit or miss, basically.

    As I said, I loved biology in school. Within a few weeks of A-level i'd completely gone off it. I found it was all about memorising stuff still and I was sick of that (especially compared to my new love of chemistry, much more about trends and puzzle-based in many aspects). So yeah, with biology I don't think you can go wrong with it assuming you're good at just churning out a textbook. The exams can be a little bit awkward as they're very big on key words but if you pay attention to the historic mark schemes it's easy enough to work out what you need to do. I do think there is still some interesting content in the subject though, it's just I didn't care for that parrot fashion learning.

    English, History, and Maths seem like a decent combination for you. After that, either/or depending on what you want out of it. Biology is probably a safer bet, chemistry for more risk/reward.

    (I eventually went on to do a chemistry degree so there's the root of my bias )
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    Thank you ! That was really insightful I just saw the syllabus of history and I think I will enjoy it cx Huh yes I think I'm going to be stuck between biology and chemistry sigh
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    (Original post by peanelope)
    Please help me answer these questions. For GCSE, I took Triple Science, Maths, English language, English lit, French, ICT, Art and History. I am a year 11 student right now (mocks are coming up which I have yet to revise for). I'm predicted several A's and and A*s perhaps like 2 B's if I fail the exam but coursework wise, I'm good. I'm a dedicated student who has good social skills don't worry and I really want to go to a Russel Group University so I'm taking 'facilitating subjects' I don't particularly like the 'soft' subjects anyways.

    I've researched for days guys. Below are the two subjects I know I'm taking and why but some questions with them.

    1. English Literature- With Full marks for Coursework at GCSE I really enjoy English and will probably take it for A level. How are the exams? Is the essay (the dissertation) hard or do you get any help?
    2. Maths- Though I don't enjoy it as much. I understand it and it's logical. I think I would be able to take the pressure. I know how hard it is but it's worth it. Is the exam style similar or are they completely different?

    Now I have no idea what else to take. Firstly, I have a passion for writing so I'm probably going to take an english lit degree but I still want to take a wide amount of options. I also change my mind a lot so I just want to have a backup, Unlike GCSE's where I took all coursework subjects which I now regret, I now want to take a balanced amount of coursework and exams.

    The subjects I'm interested in are:
    1. History- though I'm questioning if this is too similar to english literature. I'm already taking an essay subject. Is it worth taking another and adding more to my workload?
    2. Chemistry- Right now I don't get C7 and my teacher said that it is harder but much more rewarding. First off is this true? Secondly, I don't have much patience and have really bad concentration when I find something boring. Does chemistry get boring? How are the exams. However, I find chemistry interesting at times but boring at other times.
    3. Biology- Not bragging but I find Biology the easiest out of all the sciences. Is it just memorisation like in GCSE's? If so, is this A level more about understanding? Are the exams harder?

    Subjects I know for sure I'm not taking
    Business studies, psychology, sociology, dance, ICT, computer science and much more I can't remember

    I would be so thankful if someone answered these questions and also told me their experiences about these subjects
    I'm going to answer this presuming you're aiming for A/A* in your A Levels.

    I don't reccomend taking maths if you don't enjoy it, I can't tell you how many people dropped it for AS, and were then left with 3 AS subjects. But if you can cope and are on track for an A* at GCSE, and it doesn't leave you drained, then there's no reason not to take it. It certainly is respected because it teaches you how to think logically, and deal with abstract concepts. it opens a huge range of careers, and teaches you some amazing skills. It's something which comes with practice!

    AS level Chemistry is known for its difficultly, no one in my class got above a B last year, and we have people predicted A* in Further Maths. A Level sciences are much more applied, focused on graphs and experiments, at times the markschemes are frustrating. This is paticularly annoying with Biology, as there is a LOT to remember, and they want very certain things in the exam. At A Level, memory questions are considered to be the easiest, whereas I remember a large amount of GCSE science questions to be based on memory. On top of this, sciences have atrocious controlled assessments, which have ridiculously high grade boundaries. Last year it was 48/50 for an A in chemistry. Luckily, they aren't weighted too heavily. But you'll need 90% UMS ( essentially full marks) in your A2 ISA for an A*. But the sciences are definitely fascinating to study, and open up a range of careers. Keep in mind that to study quite a few science courses, you need at least 2/3 of them ( including maths). This is certainly a challenge! As their work load is probably the highest!

    A level English is brilliant. It teaches you to think analytically and with structure. It's not like GCSE where you' can say anything, the most sophisticated answers show good understanding of the overall text, and look at things like characterisation, narrative structure. Looking at broader themes and developments, considering differences in poetry, prose drama, and how literature resonates and frames society. It can be challenging, it's not just about reading, one of the keenest readers in my class got a B in his exam! It requires a lot of thought, and letting one idea roll and develop, using different parts of the novel to support your ideas. GCSE is largely focused on language analysis, but Form and Structure become equally important at A Level. There was a large amount of unseen material in my course, so it is vital to develop the skill to analyse things at a first glance. In A Level, there is a lot more thinking in the exam than GCSE, which is more focused on memory. It also opens up a range of humanity degrees which can lead to careers in management, marketing, law, politics, the intelligence, what ever. History is similar. But if you're thinking of going down that route I'd reccomend doing them both, especially if essays are your strength!

    Usually, 3 traditional A Levels are enough, even for top unis. So for your 4th, whatever! It's good to have an easier subject, A Levels are very hard! A break is really needed. I'd reccomend thinking about what your strengths are, and what you want to do in the future. Also what would you enjoy studying? You'll tend to do best in these subjects.
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    (Original post by Big Blue Machine)
    I'm going to answer this presuming you're aiming for A/A* in your A Levels.

    I don't reccomend taking maths if you don't enjoy it, I can't tell you how many people dropped it for AS, and were then left with 3 AS subjects. But if you can cope and are on track for an A* at GCSE, and it doesn't leave you drained, then there's no reason not to take it. It certainly is respected because it teaches you how to think logically, and deal with abstract concepts. it opens a huge range of careers, and teaches you some amazing skills. It's something which comes with practice!

    AS level Chemistry is known for its difficultly, no one in my class got above a B last year, and we have people predicted A* in Further Maths. A Level sciences are much more applied, focused on graphs and experiments, at times the markschemes are frustrating. This is paticularly annoying with Biology, as there is a LOT to remember, and they want very certain things in the exam. At A Level, memory questions are considered to be the easiest, whereas I remember a large amount of GCSE science questions to be based on memory. On top of this, sciences have atrocious controlled assessments, which have ridiculously high grade boundaries. Last year it was 48/50 for an A in chemistry. Luckily, they aren't weighted too heavily. But you'll need 90% UMS ( essentially full marks) in your A2 ISA for an A*. But the sciences are definitely fascinating to study, and open up a range of careers. Keep in mind that to study quite a few science courses, you need at least 2/3 of them ( including maths). This is certainly a challenge! As their work load is probably the highest!

    A level English is brilliant. It teaches you to think analytically and with structure. It's not like GCSE where you' can say anything, the most sophisticated answers show good understanding of the overall text, and look at things like characterisation, narrative structure. Looking at broader themes and developments, considering differences in poetry, prose drama, and how literature resonates and frames society. It can be challenging, it's not just about reading, one of the keenest readers in my class got a B in his exam! It requires a lot of thought, and letting one idea roll and develop, using different parts of the novel to support your ideas. GCSE is largely focused on language analysis, but Form and Structure become equally important at A Level. There was a large amount of unseen material in my course, so it is vital to develop the skill to analyse things at a first glance. In A Level, there is a lot more thinking in the exam than GCSE, which is more focused on memory. It also opens up a range of humanity degrees which can lead to careers in management, marketing, law, politics, the intelligence, what ever. History is similar. But if you're thinking of going down that route I'd reccomend doing them both, especially if essays are your strength!

    Usually, 3 traditional A Levels are enough, even for top unis. So for your 4th, whatever! It's good to have an easier subject, A Levels are very hard! A break is really needed. I'd reccomend thinking about what your strengths are, and what you want to do in the future. Also what would you enjoy studying? You'll tend to do best in these subjects.
    Thank you so much. I'm really struggling to choose now lol. Is there point in taking science (chemistry or biology) if I'm going to drop it going into A2? The thing is I don't even enjoy the 'easy' subjects which is weird. My strength has to be writing essays, planning, leadership and working in a group. I'm quite social. Though I don't like the sciences, they do open doors to jobs that are trustworthy, respected and forever in need for more (such as doctors) so I'm thinking about changing everything ughh
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    (Original post by peanelope)
    Thank you so much. I'm really struggling to choose now lol. Is there point in taking science (chemistry or biology) if I'm going to drop it going into A2? The thing is I don't even enjoy the 'easy' subjects which is weird. My strength has to be writing essays, planning, leadership and working in a group. I'm quite social. Though I don't like the sciences, they do open doors to jobs that are trustworthy, respected and forever in need for more (such as doctors) so I'm thinking about changing everything ughh
    I think I find subjects easy which I enjoy. I think all A Levels are hard. But the sciences and History, Geography, English Lit and Languages are usually regarded as the hardest, they test very different skills. Some ( such as myself) would die in maths, but my friend applying for physics at Cambridge had to drop History because he just couldn't cope with essays.

    Essay writing is a great skill to have! English Lit and History are usually regarded the two best for developing those skills, eg. formation of argument, etc. They can lead to careers in law, marketing, politics, advertising, and anything really, you always need to write and communicate!

    Stick to your strengths. Medicine is a career I was considering. It's a very noble career, but tiring. I was at A&E today, and the doctor told me it's good I decided not to do medicine! He admitted he did it for the prestige, salary etc. But now regrets not doing economics. If you're going for money economics is the way to go it seems. But medicine still makes a huge impact, and is s noble ambition. but stick to your strengths and what you love, because that way, whatever you end up doing, you'll be good at it! And if you're good at something, you can be promoted, and you'll have more security!

    I'd reccomend you choose a range for security. English Lit ( more creative)/ History ( more political, good for politics) and Maths opens a ton of doors and develop key skills. Add further maths and physics for engineering, biology and chemistry for medicine, art and physics for architecture. It's a good idea to have a mix. If you want to be more essay focused do both English and History, good for law and politics. For economics, do maths further maths economics and an essay subject. Lots of options!

    Variety is key.
 
 
 
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