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    Can anyone give me some advice regarding the OASC please?
    I have my OASC fairly soon, but recently picked up a leg injury that's put me out of jogging for a few weeks now and so I'm worried that my physical fitness might not be up to scratch, would it be advisable to ask to go on a further date?
    Also any other advice for the OASC is much appreciated? How can I prepare? What to expect etc...
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    (Original post by BCS1997)
    Can anyone give me some advice regarding the OASC please?
    I have my OASC fairly soon, but recently picked up a leg injury that's put me out of jogging for a few weeks now and so I'm worried that my physical fitness might not be up to scratch, would it be advisable to ask to go on a further date?
    Also any other advice for the OASC is much appreciated? How can I prepare? What to expect etc...
    Search the forum. There's a big armed forces area where this question has been asked and answered hundreds of times.
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    Hi, that's really bad luck picking up an injury just when you want to be on top form for OASC. If you feel it's going to slow you down or prevent you from doing the bleep test, then yes you should advise your AFCO , who can decide a timescale for slotting you into the selection process.

    In terms of advice for OASC - as Drewski says, there is a whole library of open source material available on this site and elsewhere, detailing virtually every second of your visit to Cranwell. You're going to have to find it and research it yourself, cos one of the big traits the selectors will be looking for is initiative. Nothing gets handed to you on a plate in the military, and if you really want the job, you'll have to work hard for it.

    I managed to get selected for pilot in 1976, and went to OASC Biggin Hill armed with nothing more than 5 O levels (GCSEs), a big pot of enthusiasm, a slim brochure detailing the 3 day selection procedure, a head full of current affairs and some serious RAF knowledge gleaned from membership of the CCF and 10 years of digesting every single copy of Air Pictorial and Flight International I could get my hands on. No internet, no discussions with other candidates, I went in completely cold. That's the way it was in those days, and although the aptitude testing has become computerised, the person they want today is exactly the same as the person they wanted in 1976.

    A career in the RAF is worth fighting hard for, so the question is, how badly do you want it?

    Good luck mate, and let us know how you get on.
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    (Original post by Ikaruss)

    I managed to get selected for pilot in 1976, and went to OASC Biggin Hill armed with nothing more than 5 O levels (GCSEs), a big pot of enthusiasm, a slim brochure detailing the 3 day selection procedure, a head full of current affairs and some serious RAF knowledge gleaned from membership of the CCF and 10 years of digesting every single copy of Air Pictorial and Flight International I could get my hands on. No internet, no discussions with other candidates, I went in completely cold. That's the way it was in those days, and although the aptitude testing has become computerised, the person they want today is exactly the same as the person they wanted in 1976.

    A career in the RAF is worth fighting hard for, so the question is, how badly do you want it?

    Good luck mate, and let us know how you get on.
    Great story, I'm sure you have some brilliant tales!

    I have OASC on November 9th. Anyone else on that one too?
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    (Original post by TElawrence)
    Great story, I'm sure you have some brilliant tales!

    I have OASC on November 9th. Anyone else on that one too?
    Mines a little later, best of luck on yours.
    What current affairs are you using? How are you feeling about it?
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    (Original post by BCS1997)
    Mines a little later, best of luck on yours.
    What current affairs are you using? How are you feeling about it?
    Thanks.

    I feel ready, I'm just eager to get it done.

    As for current affairs, I've been reading up on the big stories, ISIS, Ukraine, US elections 2016 etc. From what I understand the most important thing is not to necessarily be an expert but have an opinion on whatever and be prepared to back it up and don't neglect domestic stories either.
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    (Original post by TElawrence)
    Great story, I'm sure you have some brilliant tales!

    I have OASC on November 9th. Anyone else on that one too?
    I have just been told I have OASC on November 8th. If I dont see you there then best of luck!
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    (Original post by JKurlz)
    I have just been told I have OASC on November 8th. If I dont see you there then best of luck!
    PM sent
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Search the forum. There's a big armed forces area where this question has been asked and answered hundreds of times.
    Maybe not an this issue in this particular case, but how can potential candidates know what information is up to date and still relevant? I know it must be a ball ache to repeat yourself a million times, but searching up and ploughing through thousands of posts (all of which, must be taken with a pinch of salt), which potentially could be outdated. (A lot of posts to some of the questions I've had were pre-SDSR for example).

    This is not me saying "We can't be bothered to do our research". TSR is a very useful resource, with some very nice people who take the time to give an informed response. Arrse and Pprune, not so much. This section is the sole reason I've used this forum for many years now. Under a different account a looooong time ago, I posted about becoming an RAF Pilot just after I had finished my GCSEs. Final year of degree now. Things have changed (maybe not as much as I've thought), but in this time I've seen our maritime capability scraped, a whole position (nav) scrapped, harriers scrapped, F35b - F35a back to F35b again, God knows what else. The UAS system has changed. Now it is directly a recruitment service to full time RAF. This is quoting the new guy in charge of Group 22 (I think it was him who paid a visit). To gain a third year on a UAS, you need to have an active application to the military. Otherwise, no matter how useful you were, you're out. Now they're hiring UAV pilots as a seperate role. WSO has come back in place of navigator(?)

    My point is, the RAF has changed (albeit slightly from somebody on the outside) and some of the posts when you do a search go WAY back and maybe the advice given back then isn't appropriate for the applicant today.
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    (Original post by JD1lla)
    Maybe not an this issue in this particular case, but how can potential candidates know what information is up to date and still relevant? I know it must be a ball ache to repeat yourself a million times, but searching up and ploughing through thousands of posts (all of which, must be taken with a pinch of salt), which potentially could be outdated. (A lot of posts to some of the questions I've had were pre-SDSR for example).

    This is not me saying "We can't be bothered to do our research". TSR is a very useful resource, with some very nice people who take the time to give an informed response. Arrse and Pprune, not so much. This section is the sole reason I've used this forum for many years now. Under a different account a looooong time ago, I posted about becoming an RAF Pilot just after I had finished my GCSEs. Final year of degree now. Things have changed (maybe not as much as I've thought), but in this time I've seen our maritime capability scraped, a whole position (nav) scrapped, harriers scrapped, F35b - F35a back to F35b again, God knows what else. The UAS system has changed. Now it is directly a recruitment service to full time RAF. This is quoting the new guy in charge of Group 22 (I think it was him who paid a visit). To gain a third year on a UAS, you need to have an active application to the military. Otherwise, no matter how useful you were, you're out. Now they're hiring UAV pilots as a seperate role. WSO has come back in place of navigator(?)

    My point is, the RAF has changed (albeit slightly from somebody on the outside) and some of the posts when you do a search go WAY back and maybe the advice given back then isn't appropriate for the applicant today.
    The process at OASC remains largely unchanged. You still do the same tasks and still expect to meet the same criteria.
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    (Original post by JD1lla)
    Maybe not an this issue in this particular case, but how can potential candidates know what information is up to date and still relevant? I know it must be a ball ache to repeat yourself a million times, but searching up and ploughing through thousands of posts (all of which, must be taken with a pinch of salt), which potentially could be outdated. (A lot of posts to some of the questions I've had were pre-SDSR for example).

    This is not me saying "We can't be bothered to do our research". TSR is a very useful resource, with some very nice people who take the time to give an informed response. Arrse and Pprune, not so much. This section is the sole reason I've used this forum for many years now. Under a different account a looooong time ago, I posted about becoming an RAF Pilot just after I had finished my GCSEs. Final year of degree now. Things have changed (maybe not as much as I've thought), but in this time I've seen our maritime capability scraped, a whole position (nav) scrapped, harriers scrapped, F35b - F35a back to F35b again, God knows what else. The UAS system has changed. Now it is directly a recruitment service to full time RAF. This is quoting the new guy in charge of Group 22 (I think it was him who paid a visit). To gain a third year on a UAS, you need to have an active application to the military. Otherwise, no matter how useful you were, you're out. Now they're hiring UAV pilots as a seperate role. WSO has come back in place of navigator(?)

    My point is, the RAF has changed (albeit slightly from somebody on the outside) and some of the posts when you do a search go WAY back and maybe the advice given back then isn't appropriate for the applicant today.
    I challenge you to find a question that isn't answered (that realistically could be answered) amongst these threads.

    Yes. Some information is out of date. But a huge amount isn't. Having a bit of initiative and finding answers for yourself isn't hard and should be encouraged.

    The post of mine you quote is from before this thread was moved from news and current affairs to this forum, so was highly relevant.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    I challenge you to find a question that isn't answered (that realistically could be answered) amongst these threads.

    Yes. Some information is out of date. But a huge amount isn't. Having a bit of initiative and finding answers for yourself isn't hard and should be encouraged.

    The post of mine you quote is from before this thread was moved from news and current affairs to this forum, so was highly relevant.
    My question is what is it the career pipeline really like in the AAC.

    Typical response here: Don't join if you want to be a pilot, that's the RAF's game, Army know nothing about aviation. You do two tours and then fly a desk. Large gaps inbetween training, no money to fly anyway etc. If you REALLY want to fly in the Army, join as NCO, they fly for longer.

    I've heard differently from serving members, however, that that is not true.

    Also, what does an Army Officer 'do' as opposed to an RAF Officer? Army Officers get their 30 men to look after, what do RAF officers 'do' in terms of leadership/management at Flying officer level for example. The typical response here is RAF Officers are more 'specialized' or something along those lines, and hence don't need the extra 14 weeks at Cranwell that Army Officers require.
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    (Original post by JD1lla)
    My question is what is it the career pipeline really like in the AAC.

    Typical response here: Don't join if you want to be a pilot, that's the RAF's game, Army know nothing about aviation. You do two tours and then fly a desk. Large gaps inbetween training, no money to fly anyway etc. If you REALLY want to fly in the Army, join as NCO, they fly for longer.

    I've heard differently from serving members, however, that that is not true.

    Also, what does an Army Officer 'do' as opposed to an RAF Officer? The typical response here is RAF Officers are more 'specialized' or something along those lines, and hence don't need the extra 14 weeks at Cranwell that Army Officers require.

    www.google.com
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    (Original post by Anderson134353)
    www.google.com
    Oh yeah! Totally forgot about Google! Maybe we should close this section because everything we need to know about..well..anything is all indexed on google.
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    (Original post by JD1lla)
    Oh yeah! Totally forgot about Google! Maybe we should close this section because everything we need to know about..well..anything is all indexed on google.
    Everything you have asked about life as an RAF Officer, life as an AAC Officer, differences between RAF and AAC, diffencenes in training are all easily searched. You can from that draw lines from all the little bits of info you find.

    No one is going to hold your hand because when you are an officer you are on your own.
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    (Original post by Anderson134353)
    Everything you have asked about life as an RAF Officer, life as an AAC Officer, differences between RAF and AAC, diffencenes in training are all easily searched. You can from that draw lines from all the little bits of info you find.

    No one is going to hold your hand because when you are an officer you are on your own.
    Really? Never heard that before.

    I edited my post slightly. I don't want to know what 'life is like' as an officer. That's not the question I am asking. Nor am I asking for the differences in AAC and RAF. Nor am I asking for difference in training. That's all available on the appropriate official websites.
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    (Original post by JD1lla)
    My question is what is it the career pipeline really like in the AAC.

    Typical response here: Don't join if you want to be a pilot, that's the RAF's game, Army know nothing about aviation. You do two tours and then fly a desk. Large gaps inbetween training, no money to fly anyway etc. If you REALLY want to fly in the Army, join as NCO, they fly for longer.

    I've heard differently from serving members, however, that that is not true.

    Also, what does an Army Officer 'do' as opposed to an RAF Officer? Army Officers get their 30 men to look after, what do RAF officers 'do' in terms of leadership/management at Flying officer level for example. The typical response here is RAF Officers are more 'specialized' or something along those lines, and hence don't need the extra 14 weeks at Cranwell that Army Officers require.
    Hearing differently from members is basing it on anecdotal evidence which isn't always best. You'll always get people who do things differently to the norm, look at the professional aviator spine in the RAF - yes it's possible, but it's not the normal/average/typical route.

    What is it really like? Well that depends on too many vague factors we can't decide. Does your desk officer like you? Do you pass everything first time? Do you opt for desk tours to hobknob with senior officers? We can, and have, described what it's typically like, which is by far a more realistic idea.

    And again, the difference in officers, it's a vague question. I'm sure you already know that army officers join as officers without a branch, while RAF (and RN) officers join for a particular branch. The difference then in training can be broken down to that army has need for more generic skills, while the RAF allows it's officers to develop theirs during phase 2 training - an officer out of Sandhurst is ready to go, an officer out of Cranwell isn't.

    So a Flying officer? Unlikely to do much in the way of direct man-management, especially if a pilot. They might lead teams but they'll be small, under 10, and with an SNCO to help them and under the fairly close supervision of a more experienced officer. Certainly that was true in my case and my branch.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Hearing differently from members is basing it on anecdotal evidence which isn't always best. You'll always get people who do things differently to the norm, look at the professional aviator spine in the RAF - yes it's possible, but it's not the normal/average/typical route.

    What is it really like? Well that depends on too many vague factors we can't decide. Does your desk officer like you? Do you pass everything first time? Do you opt for desk tours to hobknob with senior officers? We can, and have, described what it's typically like, which is by far a more realistic idea.

    And again, the difference in officers, it's a vague question. I'm sure you already know that army officers join as officers without a branch, while RAF (and RN) officers join for a particular branch. The difference then in training can be broken down to that army has need for more generic skills, while the RAF allows it's officers to develop theirs during phase 2 training - an officer out of Sandhurst is ready to go, an officer out of Cranwell isn't.

    So a Flying officer? Unlikely to do much in the way of direct man-management, especially if a pilot. They might lead teams but they'll be small, under 10, and with an SNCO to help them and under the fairly close supervision of a more experienced officer. Certainly that was true in my case and my branch.
    Thank you for the response.

    It's the only experience I have so far, anecdotal. Had an AAC Major for a few weeks helping out the QFIs for our flying training, but I didn't get to fly with him because of the weather, and he was busy so didn't have much interaction with him. From what I've heard he was a brilliant aviator. From what I've read from RAF/pprune types as well as my old squadron leader, they treat their helis like flying tanks (apache) and don't really understand air power. Again, anecdotal.

    Already in contact with my CSM who wants me to get on with my application to have a date for Sandhurst, but I'm considering applying for RAF still. It was what I was originally set on. Infact I remember you and ProStacker replying to my very first thread in here so many years ago. I structured my whole life around trying to make myself as sellable as possible. I had particularly negative experience of the UAS that I'd not discuss here which sort of swayed my decision. Watered down EFT wasn't as exciting as I thought it would be, and other things (could never win the Vauxhall off of you basterds). I still really can't decide with 100% certainty on what I want to do/apply for.

    It's not as simple as, if I want to fly, RAF, if I want to be a soldier who can fly, Army. Army is a much riskier choice, and the boys at ARRSE have tried to put me in contact with the relevant people, but they're busy, as I predicted.

    Some of us have very specific questions that the AFCOs just can't answer.
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    I think the sarcastic posts are more geared towards your attitude, you really need to lighten up before you hit initial training or you'll be eaten alive.

    Have you tried to arrange visits to units to speak to people already doing those jobs? It looks better during your application and yes, will be subjective from that individuals point of view, but may provide you more valuable information than scouring the Internet.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by teasin_tina)
    I think the sarcastic posts are more geared towards your attitude, you really need to lighten up before you hit initial training or you'll be eaten alive.

    Have you tried to arrange visits to units to speak to people already doing those jobs? It looks better during your application and yes, will be subjective from that individuals point of view, but may provide you more valuable information than scouring the Internet.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Visited a few bases and an SVA. Lots of different opinions/and sometimes conflicting advice
 
 
 
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