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Finance and economics degree without A-level maths? watch

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    Do you think I would struggle with the maths in this? It tends to include matrix algebra, comparative statics and integral calculus. If i put in a lot of work, would it be easy to cope with or is the leap from GCSE maths to degree too big? Is accounting and finance a better option? sorry for all the questions, i really need advice
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    Do you think I would struggle with the maths in this? It tends to include matrix algebra, comparative statics and integral calculus. If i put in a lot of work, would it be easy to cope with or is the leap from GCSE maths to degree too big? Is accounting and finance a better option? sorry for all the questions, i really need advice
    What level is the highest maths qualification that you hold?
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    (Original post by Geshe)
    What level is the highest maths qualification that you hold?
    I got an A at GCSE
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    I got an A at GCSE
    You will need knowledge of Level 3 mathematics.
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    (Original post by Geshe)
    You will need knowledge of Level 3 mathematics.
    Do you think i can just work hard for it because the uni only asks for a B at gcse and i exceed it
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    Do you think I would struggle with the maths in this? It tends to include matrix algebra, comparative statics and integral calculus. If i put in a lot of work, would it be easy to cope with or is the leap from GCSE maths to degree too big? Is accounting and finance a better option? sorry for all the questions, i really need advice
    OMG ITS KSI! Big fan bro. Big fan.

    Only kidding bro. Personally I suggest you do take A-Level maths as generally most Unis would require it anyway? Have you had a look if universities require A-Level maths or not? Is there anything stopping you from taking A-Level maths? Honestly, you should go for whichever one interests you the most. University will be a lot of work regardless if you took A-Level maths or not.
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    (Original post by Immunology)
    OMG ITS KSI! Big fan bro. Big fan.

    Only kidding bro. Personally I suggest you do take A-Level maths as generally most Unis would require it anyway? Have you had a look if universities require A-Level maths or not? Is there anything stopping you from taking A-Level maths? Honestly, you should go for whichever one interests you the most. University will be a lot of work regardless if you took A-Level maths or not.
    Haha! It's too late to do a-level maths now, i'm starting uni next year! The unis do not require a level maths but i worried about being at a disadvantage as others would have it, leaving me behind in class
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    Haha! It's too late to do a-level maths now, i'm starting uni next year! The unis do not require a level maths but i worried about being at a disadvantage as others would have it, leaving me behind in class
    Especially as you only got an A grade at GCSE (A* grade at GCSE has very, very minor slices of level 3 mathematics) you really need to start at least going over C1-C4. Ignore the applied modules, but definitely start learning the core modules.
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    Haha! It's too late to do a-level maths now, i'm starting uni next year! The unis do not require a level maths but i worried about being at a disadvantage as others would have it, leaving me behind in class
    If you believe you are willing to put the work in 100% and really have the motivation to do the course... I say go for it! Whichever one appeals to you the most and is the one that you feel like 'Yeah I'm definately going to put the work in if I get in' then do that one. How about looking over one of the aspects of the course and just have a quick go at learning it. If you get the generally gist of it then you should apply. (When I say have a look at one of the topics, if you don't understand it then its fine. It's university work after all). Also, why not ring one of the universities up. Ask them if they ease people who haven't taken A-Level maths into the course. Good luck!
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    (Original post by Immunology)
    If you believe you are willing to put the work in 100% and really have the motivation to do the course... I say go for it! Whichever one appeals to you the most and is the one that you feel like 'Yeah I'm definately going to put the work in if I get in' then do that one. How about looking over one of the aspects of the course and just have a quick go at learning it. If you get the generally gist of it then you should apply. (When I say have a look at one of the topics, if you don't understand it then its fine. It's university work after all). Also, why not ring one of the universities up. Ask them if they ease people who haven't taken A-Level maths into the course. Good luck!
    Is there a huge difference in career prospects between accounting and finance and economics and finance?
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    Is there a huge difference in career prospects between accounting and finance and economics and finance?
    No idea pal. I'll check it out for you
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    Is there a huge difference in career prospects between accounting and finance and economics and finance?
    Did some googling. Accounting and finance seems as though only 8.6% of people are unemployed and 7.7% in economics and finance. Either way, you'd be fine. Choose which one suits you.
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    Is there a huge difference in career prospects between accounting and finance and economics and finance?
    Not hugely. Accounting and finance will however limit you to Accountancy, generally.
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    (Original post by pic)
    Not hugely. Accounting and finance will however limit you to Accountancy, generally.
    I just want to work in the financial industry e.g. in accounting, banking, financial analyst etc. Not sure which one will benefit me more. I do know that accounting and finance is less 'difficult' and that is what is making me indecisive as i want to get the best possible grade out of uni, especially because of the costs.
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    I just want to work in the financial industry e.g. in accounting, banking, financial analyst etc. Not sure which one will benefit me more. I do know that accounting and finance is less 'difficult' and that is what is making me indecisive as i want to get the best possible grade out of uni, especially because of the costs.
    Yep, I'm just saying you will find it difficult (maybe very depending on Uni you go to and classification) to have a decent job in the financial industry that's NOT accountancy if you study accounting and finance. I imagine this isn't a huge problem for you, and by focusing on a specific area your chances of success should be better (targeting placements, internships, etc..). Hope I helped.
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    Do you think I would struggle with the maths in this? It tends to include matrix algebra, comparative statics and integral calculus. If i put in a lot of work, would it be easy to cope with or is the leap from GCSE maths to degree too big? Is accounting and finance a better option? sorry for all the questions, i really need advice
    Econ is a no-no without maths. You wouldn't enjoy it one bit
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    Just graduated with a Finance and Economics degree. Finance wouldn't be much bother without an A level in maths. As for economics I knew a few people who had low grade Higher Maths, i.e a C (higher being close to the Scottish equivalent of A-level), and they struggled quite a bit.

    Essentially the maths isn't really all that bad. Majority of it is just calculus. But reading the textbooks can be quite mathematical and so probably tough without a grounding in some higher level maths.

    If you really wanted to study economics I reckon you could get up to speed with the maths and still do well. Plus if you are a few years into the degree and you are struggling with the maths then you can tailor your choices a little if you really had to. Microeconomics tended to be more maths based in my experience whereas macroeconomics tended to be more written.
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    (Original post by Finglas)
    Just graduated with a Finance and Economics degree. Finance wouldn't be much bother without an A level in maths. As for economics I knew a few people who had low grade Higher Maths, i.e a C (higher being close to the Scottish equivalent of A-level), and they struggled quite a bit.

    Essentially the maths isn't really all that bad. Majority of it is just calculus. But reading the textbooks can be quite mathematical and so probably tough without a grounding in some higher level maths.

    If you really wanted to study economics I reckon you could get up to speed with the maths and still do well. Plus if you are a few years into the degree and you are struggling with the maths then you can tailor your choices a little if you really had to. Microeconomics tended to be more maths based in my experience whereas macroeconomics tended to be more written.
    TBH the main thing really pushing me to do economics is the fact that it is a 'traditional' subject. All i want to do is work in the financial sector and I believe I can do this with either courses, am i right? Also, did the people that struggled get good grades?
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    You can pretty much study any substantial subject at uni and work in the financial services industry. I have heard of people getting jobs for top firms with English literature degrees and history degrees. Having said this I would still imagine your chances are increased with a finance and or economics degree.

    Yeh the people that struggled with maths still done fairly well. Some I know still good got 2.1's and I studied at a fairly good uni, so they did not just give out good grades left and right.

    Essentially you just need to be comfortable with maths. You will work with loads of graphs most likely. Almost every essay I wrote involved graphs to illustrate theories. That was a common complaint from the folks not so great at maths. They seemed to dislike all the graphs.

    Good luck with whatever you choose
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    Is there a huge difference in career prospects between accounting and finance and economics and finance?
    Yes. The former usually means you go into accounting. The second could mean you could go into a wide variety of jobs at banks, being an investment banker, etc.
    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    I just want to work in the financial industry e.g. in accounting, banking, financial analyst etc. Not sure which one will benefit me more. I do know that accounting and finance is less 'difficult' and that is what is making me indecisive as i want to get the best possible grade out of uni, especially because of the costs.
    Perhaps consider an apprenticeship, if this is still available to you.
 
 
 
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