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    TCD. Huge if overrated Kudos, highest entry requirements, best campus, good student life. In UK people think of it in terms of Oxbridge, durham Bristol UCL Imperial. Other colleges in Ireland are great but go for TCD because the brits think it is the bees knees.
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    (Original post by zaphod11)
    the brits think it is the bees knees.
    thats what ive been wondering. i think that im more or less decided that is assuming that trinity will let me in the door.
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    With all due respect I don't think trinity ranks with the oxbridge/durham/bristols etc?
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    With all due respect I don't think trinity ranks with the oxbridge/durham/bristols etc?
    i wouldnt rank it with oxbridge but i would be quite happy to compare it to durham/bristol etc.
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    (Original post by roxy potter)
    i wouldnt rank it with oxbridge but i would be quite happy to compare it to durham/bristol etc.
    Take maths for example, the other unis you listed expect A grade in Alevel maths, usually A grade in further maths, and possibly AEA/STEP grades. Trinity would take them with a B in maths?
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    With all due respect I don't think trinity ranks with the oxbridge/durham/bristols etc?
    Neither do I. Outside of the English universities, I would say that Edinburgh and St. Andrews are more prestigious than TCD.

    TCD is perhaps ahead of Glasgow and Cardiff.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    Neither do I. Outside of the English universities, I would say that Edinburgh and St. Andrews are more prestigious than TCD.

    TCD is perhaps ahead of Glasgow and Cardiff.
    Agreed. All three of those are asking for the same sort of grades. BBCish
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Agreed. All three of those are asking for the same sort of grades. BBCish
    i dont know about the british system. but over here entry requirements are based on who applies, the grades that they look for are the same usually as what the lowest qualified person who gets into the course got. anyway you dont judge a uni by its entry requirements you judge it by the graduates it produces.
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    (Original post by roxy potter)
    i dont know about the british system. but over here entry requirements are based on who applies, the grades that they look for are the same usually as what the lowest qualified person who gets into the course got. anyway you dont judge a uni by its entry requirements you judge it by the graduates it produces.
    THe system is fairly similar here, Durham/Bristol/IC/UCL may well ask for AAB, but really they're looking for AAAA.

    Again with all due respect, the IC course is going to be working on the assumption that the large majority of their students will have double maths both at A grade, then a couple more alevels, both at A grade, ie. AAAA, and many will be familiar with AEA/STEP questions, as many will be there after falling short of oxbridge offers. This is clearly going to be operating at a much faster pace, and start at a much higher level than a course which has to accomodate people who struggled to get a B grade in Alevel maths.
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    THe system is fairly similar here, Durham/Bristol/IC/UCL may well ask for AAB, but really they're looking for AAAA.
    in ireland its the same most people get much higher than the minimum entry requirements.

    (Original post by fishpaste)
    accomodate people who struggled to get a B grade in Alevel maths.
    the thing is that it doesnt because trinity starts from further back because of the leaving cert system.
    its not long bringing them up to speed though because it produces top class graduates.
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    (Original post by roxy potter)
    in ireland its the same most people get much higher than the minimum entry requirements.



    the thing is that it doesnt because trinity starts from further back because of the leaving cert system.
    its not long bringing them up to speed though because it produces top class graduates.
    It must take about a year though.
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    It must take about a year though.
    i doubt it if it was to take that long then you may aswell study something else. leaving cert maths is considered to be 2 thirds of an a level.
    it doesnt really seem to affect the end product though but what im trying to say is that irish unis can afford to go easy on uk applicants because of the differences in education systems.
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    The TCD mathematics course is about the only one in Ireland I can think of off that doesn't take first year to get up to where a good UK maths degree starts off. In fact it's the only maths degree I've seen ever where students encounter complex analysis in their first year, but I'd love to hear of other examples of ye have them. Have you seen first year algebra?? Sylow's theorems and Galois groups at that stage is not exactly taking it slowly, so I wish ye'd do a bit of research before making statements. B in higher mathematics is minimum on paper, but in reality it rarely if ever happens. Without the cushion of interview under CAO to offset a disastrous exam it's not exactly a terribly bad idea imo. However, they don't compromise their academic standards to compete with other colleges or pander to students because the don't have to (many others in Ireland do). They're Trinity.

    Trinity has its good and bad points, but at the end of the day it was founded in 1590, produces good graduates and has been heard of far wider afield than most of the other places been mentioned on here precisely because of its age, the people mentioned before as well as the likes of Stokes and Hamilton.

    [EDIT]Correction, Stokes didn't attend Trinity. Substitute Salmon, Walker, Synge etc[/EDIT]
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    (Original post by ecksor)
    The TCD mathematics course is about the only one in Ireland I can think of off that doesn't take first year to get up to where a good UK maths degree starts off. In fact it's the only maths degree I've seen ever where students encounter complex analysis in their first year, but I'd love to hear of other examples of ye have them. Have you seen first year algebra?? Sylow's theorems and Galois groups at that stage is not exactly taking it slowly, so I wish ye'd do a bit of research before making statements. B in higher mathematics is minimum on paper, but in reality it rarely if ever happens. Without the cushion of interview under CAO to offset a disastrous exam it's not exactly a terribly bad idea imo. However, they don't compromise their academic standards to compete with other colleges or pander to students because the don't have to (many others here do). They're Trinity.

    Trinity has its good and bad points, but at the end of the day it was founded in 1590, produces good graduates and has been heard of far wider afield than most of the other places been mentioned on here precisely because of its age, the people mentioned before as well as the likes of Stokes and Hamilton.
    So what is the standard for undergrad embarking on a trinity maths bsc?

    Sylow's theorems and Galois groups in the first year isn't necessarily evidence that the course is challenging for the best students. Many sixth form students could understand galois groups on one level, and yet they're not taught until 3rd year on the cambridge tripos?
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    So what is the standard for undergrad embarking on a trinity maths bsc?
    Ireland has a competitive points system meaning that the minimum standard of entry varies from year to year. (They don't award a BSc, they award a BA).

    Sylow's theorems and Galois groups in the first year isn't necessarily evidence that the course is challenging for the best students. Many sixth form students could understand galois groups on one level, and yet they're not taught until 3rd year on the cambridge tripos?
    I am challenging your assertion that it takes a year for those students to get to where a British school leaver entering a mathematics degree is at mathematically. Do you honestly think that a student who has completed and achieved a good grade on the courses listed in the first year TCD Maths degree is lagging a year behind his/her British counterpart? If so, why?
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    (Original post by ecksor)
    Ireland has a competitive points system meaning that the minimum standard of entry varies from year to year. (They don't award a BSc, they award a BA).



    I am challenging your assertion that it takes a year for those students to get to where a British school leaver entering a mathematics degree is at mathematically. Do you honestly think that a student who has completed and achieved a good grade on the courses listed in the first year TCD Maths degree is lagging a year behind his/her British counterpart? If so, why?
    I think that many of the UK posters on this thread are basing their opinions on assumptions.

    There is also a certain amount of arrogance - no other universities but the one's we consider the best can measure up to our top unis!

    I would say that none of those espousing these opinions have ever visited Trinity College, Dublin - which has a world wide reputation for excellence.
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    (Original post by ecksor)
    I am challenging your assertion that it takes a year for those students to get to where a British school leaver entering a mathematics degree is at mathematically. Do you honestly think that a student who has completed and achieved a good grade on the courses listed in the first year TCD Maths degree is lagging a year behind his/her British counterpart? If so, why?
    Well, I assume that the degree will have to start in a place where the majority are comfortable. Now I can only assume from their website that their standard intake is just above the B grade single maths student level. Unless you can show me differently, with stats about their UK student intake. I'm guessing that most people doing maths at trininty got their A grade in Alevel maths, and probably a few did some further modules, or perhaps the AEA.

    I then acknowledge that the university isn't necessarily interested in covering the further maths alevel syllabus, and so they go off in a different direction, and cover say Sylow's theorem.

    But then I think, sometime on their course they're going to be covering all these topics which get done in the further maths alevel, and developing all these techniques that come about with STEP/AEA, and that takes students here about a year.

    So to answer your question, I'm not saying somebody who has finished their first year at TCD is at the level of somebody starting their degree in IC, it doesn't make sense to compare because they've not even attempted to cover the same syllabuses. However, unless you can show me what their standard intake is of UK students and show that it's significantly higher than the A/B grade single maths student, I can only assume that they are starting further behind and moving slower.
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    That's an awful lot of assumptions and guesses. I don't understand your obsession with this model of what an A level student has achieved. I have no idea what the average English student has done at those levels, I've never even met an English student doing single honours maths at TCD. However I have spent a lot of time examining the syllabi of University maths degrees all over the British Isles and I can tell you that TCD is the only one in Ireland that measures up from the very beginning to the good English degrees. If you don't want to believe that then fine.

    You seem to think that every university degree spends its time pandering and waiting around for the slowest entrant. I think I addressed that in my first post here.
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    (Original post by roxy potter)
    I'm an Irish student and I hope to do Law. I would like to apply to do a post grad in the UK i was just wondering have more people heard of Trinity College Dublin as opposed to National University of Ireland as I want to go to a Uni that there would be recognition for and that there would be respect for in the uk.
    Good God... How many unpatriotic people are there in such a wee country. Cut the "UK" crap...

    Britain = big island to your east.
    G.B. = big island to your east with some of the wee islands around it
    Ireland = island you are on...

    I'm Irish. I come from Occupied Territories (so maybe you don't view me as Irish), and I find your post offensive...

    Anyway... TCD is the better institution. If you wanted to go to one of the 4, note, 4 - not 3! NUI colleges, then choose Galway - it's much nicer than Dublin, Belfast or Cork.

    Would you not be studying Irish law though in TCD and UCD? Maybe you should go straight to England. Note Occupied Territories and Scotland have their own legal system.

    Come and join me at Cambridge...Tá cara a dtagann as Éirinn uaim! Is dócha nach bhfuil a lán Gaelgeoirí ann agus ba mhór ba mhaith liom mo chuid Gaeilge a cleachtadh!

    That aside, most English law schools actually don't want primary law degrees. My friend Lucy did law at Southampton and has just completed her LPC in Bournemouth and she said most of the people on her course did history or something beforehand. I think it's something to do with coming with in-built prejudices or something. On the other hand, it gets you off some of your later professional exams!
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    (Original post by roxy potter)
    i doubt it if it was to take that long then you may aswell study something else. leaving cert maths is considered to be 2 thirds of an a level.
    it doesnt really seem to affect the end product though but what im trying to say is that irish unis can afford to go easy on uk applicants because of the differences in education systems.
    The maths on the Ard-leibheal of the Ardteist is probably harder than that on the A-level. It does, however, offer more choice which is good. It's also more akin to Pure Maths A-level than ordinary pick n' mic maths (I view this as good).

    Considering it is only half an A-level in terms of time (Free State students do 7 subjects from which they get marked on their best 6, English people get marked on 3 A-levels), it's hardcore.

    My brother (14) just moved over to Donegal with my mummy so I looked into this stuff...
 
 
 
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