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    accounting and finance or economics and finance?
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    accounting and finance or economics and finance?
    Economics and Maths probably
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    what are your A-levels/btec subjects?
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    (Original post by Alevelhelp97)
    what are your A-levels/btec subjects?
    Economics, Geography, Psychology. I got an A at GCSE maths but didnt choose it for A-level
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    Economics, Geography, Psychology. I got an A at GCSE maths but didnt choose it for A-level
    You should really be doing maths if you want to work in financial services, perhaps look at some apprenticeships/uni courses which don't have a maths requirement (there are some).
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    accounting and finance or economics and finance?
    Economics is the most reputable degree out of those named, the rest aren't very traditional.
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    i would probably choose an economics degree then but you should look around at what universities offer
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    I would recommend having a look at the websites of major graduate employers in that sector and seeing what they say.

    I would echo what others are saying about not taking A level maths, both on the grounds that most relevant degrees will require maths, and because careers in financial services require the use of maths on a day to day basis. If you don't like maths enough to have chosen it at A Level, do you like it enough to want to use it daily at work, or are you more interested in the high salaries?

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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    accounting and finance or economics and finance?
    If you mean IB, Consulting, IM, accounting; any degree. For the first two, university name is paramount more than anything.

    This isn't cookie cutter, however. For certain 'quant' desks on trading floors an engineering or maths degree would be of much more use than say, a history degree. That said, those desks aren't the majority and the other more 'vanilla' or 'less complex' derivative desks are more open.

    Likewise with Actuarial work or Risk, a Maths degree (or Actuarial Science degree) would be crucial to getting a job.

    It all really boils down to what you would enjoy studying - that way you'll feel more motivated to do your best in it.

    Ultimately, both of the degrees you have pointed out are useful and can lead to a variety of careers. Though I think A&F would be a lot more 'practically' useful if you wanted to do banking (actual banking like M&A/Capital Raising stuff), accounting or finance within an organisation. Whichever you choose, you'll need to build up a strong profile outside of your studies to be anywhere near competitive for the industry you want to go into given the oversupply of graduates these days.

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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    Economics, Geography, Psychology. I got an A at GCSE maths but didnt choose it for A-level
    I'd suggest taking maths to at least AS level if you want to prove your numerical ability to employers; many top universities also require maths for the degrees you're aiming at.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    If you mean IB, Consulting, IM, accounting; any degree. For the first two, university name is paramount more than anything.

    This isn't cookie cutter, however. For certain 'quant' desks on trading floors an engineering or maths degree would be of much more use than say, a history degree. That said, those desks aren't the majority and the other more 'vanilla' or 'less complex' derivative desks are more open.

    Likewise with Actuarial work or Risk, a Maths degree (or Actuarial Science degree) would be crucial to getting a job.

    It all really boils down to what you would enjoy studying - that way you'll feel more motivated to do your best in it.

    Ultimately, both of the degrees you have pointed out are useful and can lead to a variety of careers. Though I think A&F would be a lot more 'practically' useful if you wanted to do banking (actual banking like M&A/Capital Raising stuff), accounting or finance within an organisation. Whichever you choose, you'll need to build up a strong profile outside of your studies to be anywhere bear competitive for the industry you want to go into given the oversupply of graduates these days.

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    So career-wise what are the differences between having economics &finance and accounting & finance?
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    So career-wise what are the differences between having economics &finance and accounting & finance?
    Nothing

    I'm guessing you just didn't bother reading my post :rolleyes:
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    Maths is not essential at A level for your subjects, it helps but your A is more than sufficient. Solid economics wouldn't get you turned down, Economics AND Accountancy would be better, Law is a wildcard that would also get you in with a focus on company law. As long as you're at a reputable Uni on a decent course and graduate with at least 2:1.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Nothing

    I'm guessing you just didn't bother reading my post :rolleyes:
    I know what you mean but what are the main advantages of choosing one over the other? im actually so stressed, i dont know what to do
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    I know what you mean but what are the main advantages of choosing one over the other? im actually so stressed, i dont know what to do
    As follows: you do economics in one and you do accounting in the other. If you ABSOLUTELY love accounting, you get exemptions from some professional exams with A&F.

    Otherwise, just choose whichever you like the sound of more. You can't go wrong with either one.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    As follows: you do economics in one and you do accounting in the other. If you ABSOLUTELY love accounting, you get exemptions from some professional exams with A&F.

    Otherwise, just choose whichever you like the sound of more. You can't go wrong with either one.
    So what can i do with the 'finance' part? Isn't this what would increase my chance to get into the financial sector?
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    (Original post by XenonSabre)
    Maths is not essential at A level for your subjects, it helps but your A is more than sufficient. Solid economics wouldn't get you turned down, Economics AND Accountancy would be better, Law is a wildcard that would also get you in with a focus on company law. As long as you're at a reputable Uni on a decent course and graduate with at least 2:1.
    So what can i do with the 'finance' part? Isn't this what would increase my chance to get into the financial sector?
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    So what can i do with the 'finance' part? Isn't this what would increase my chance to get into the financial sector?
    No, I'm doing accounting and finance with the primary aim to become an accountant. If you want to be more involved in the financial sector, do pure finance, economics or economics and finance.
    This isn't to say you can't get into those jobs with A+F, but the other degrees are preferred as you NEED to be good at maths and that's why they all ask for A Level.
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    (Original post by KSIOlajideBT)
    So what can i do with the 'finance' part? Isn't this what would increase my chance to get into the financial sector?
    Not really. If you managed to get a job at a large firm all of the training is done on site, these places hire people with degrees in all sorts of subjects.

    I mean, it'd give you a slight edge in grasping the concepts but on the whole it's kind of irrelevant - just study what you like the sound of more lol, it's not rocket science.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    If you mean IB, Consulting, IM, accounting; any degree. For the first two, university name is paramount more than anything.

    This isn't cookie cutter, however. For certain 'quant' desks on trading floors an engineering or maths degree would be of much more use than say, a history degree. That said, those desks aren't the majority and the other more 'vanilla' or 'less complex' derivative desks are more open.

    Likewise with Actuarial work or Risk, a Maths degree (or Actuarial Science degree) would be crucial to getting a job.

    It all really boils down to what you would enjoy studying - that way you'll feel more motivated to do your best in it.

    Ultimately, both of the degrees you have pointed out are useful and can lead to a variety of careers. Though I think A&F would be a lot more 'practically' useful if you wanted to do banking (actual banking like M&A/Capital Raising stuff), accounting or finance within an organisation. Whichever you choose, you'll need to build up a strong profile outside of your studies to be anywhere bear competitive for the industry you want to go into given the oversupply of graduates these days.

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    What are the IB/consulting target unis as of late?
 
 
 
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