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    Hello guys, I'm getting closer to the time when I will have to choose courses at university to apply to and I have decided to choose an engineering degree simply because I really enjoy maths and the mathematical physics we do in school and I am very curious and think this would be a perfect degree for me. However, I've been researching a lot and have narrowed it down to mechanical and aerospace because they are the ones that deal the most with forces and mre tangible things which I like.

    BUT, I have also discovered that in mechanical engineering there are certain areas which don't seem too interesting to me, at least not now, such as hvac systems or manufacturing processes and techniques which I see their importance but wouldn't want to do as a job for the rest of my life. On the other hand I look at aerospace and it looks a lot more advanced and it uses really cool physical theories like aerodynamics or propulsion. Aerospace engineering just seems that tiny bit more futuristic and "cool" if you know what I mean.

    The only problem I have with aerospace is that I don't know if it is too focused or to specialised and maybe there will not be as much opportunity for jobs in the future. But on the other hand, even though mechanical engineering is much more broad and maybe useful when looking for a job I just have a feeling that it is going to be very tedious/boring at times for some reason.

    Well, what do you guys think? Anyone here with any of these degrees or in a similar situation that could let me her their opinion?

    Thanks very much!
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    (Original post by clfm10)
    Hello guys, I'm getting closer to the time when I will have to choose courses at university to apply to and I have decided to choose an engineering degree simply because I really enjoy maths and the mathematical physics we do in school and I am very curious and think this would be a perfect degree for me. However, I've been researching a lot and have narrowed it down to mechanical and aerospace because they are the ones that deal the most with forces and mre tangible things which I like.

    BUT, I have also discovered that in mechanical engineering there are certain areas which don't seem too interesting to me, at least not now, such as hvac systems or manufacturing processes and techniques which I see their importance but wouldn't want to do as a job for the rest of my life. On the other hand I look at aerospace and it looks a lot more advanced and it uses really cool physical theories like aerodynamics or propulsion. Aerospace engineering just seems that tiny bit more futuristic and "cool" if you know what I mean.

    The only problem I have with aerospace is that I don't know if it is too focused or to specialised and maybe there will not be as much opportunity for jobs in the future. But on the other hand, even though mechanical engineering is much more broad and maybe useful when looking for a job I just have a feeling that it is going to be very tedious/boring at times for some reason.

    Well, what do you guys think? Anyone here with any of these degrees or in a similar situation that could let me her their opinion?

    Thanks very much!
    Have you thought about General Engineering or Integrated Engineering? They basically allow you to do different engineering branches, and specialise in your last year.

    I'd suggest looking at the course modules of each uni you're applying to, which will help you decide. The first year of engineering are pretty much the same for all engineering branch.
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    Hey man, I am a mechanical engineer. Mechanical engineering is indeed very broad, in fact the broadest from all the engineering disciplines. Usually the aero classes that you are interested in, you might be able to chose them from a mechanical engineering degree, doing an aero concentration if you may. From my experience Aero and Mech students do target similar jobs and you might have a slight advantage or disadvantage over the others, but it all comes down to your personality and competencies! I would suggest that you choose a degree where you can switch after year 2 ( I know that Leeds allows you to do that), as the first 2 years are similar. Or look into a General Engineering degree, where you can specialize in what you won't to do. The decision is your alone, but I believe that you will not have major issues in finding your desired job in the future, with any of the two. Make sure you look carefully into what modules every Uni offers and that you can chose the ones you want!
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    (Original post by clfm10)
    Hello guys, I'm getting closer to the time when I will have to choose courses at university to apply to and I have decided to choose an engineering degree simply because I really enjoy maths and the mathematical physics we do in school and I am very curious and think this would be a perfect degree for me.
    Maybe you should be looking at a physics degree of some sort, if it's primarily applied maths that you are interested in.
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    (Original post by clfm10)
    Hello guys, I'm getting closer to the time when I will have to choose courses at university to apply to and I have decided to choose an engineering degree simply because I really enjoy maths and the mathematical physics we do in school and I am very curious and think this would be a perfect degree for me. However, I've been researching a lot and have narrowed it down to mechanical and aerospace because they are the ones that deal the most with forces and mre tangible things which I like.

    BUT, I have also discovered that in mechanical engineering there are certain areas which don't seem too interesting to me, at least not now, such as hvac systems or manufacturing processes and techniques which I see their importance but wouldn't want to do as a job for the rest of my life. On the other hand I look at aerospace and it looks a lot more advanced and it uses really cool physical theories like aerodynamics or propulsion. Aerospace engineering just seems that tiny bit more futuristic and "cool" if you know what I mean.

    The only problem I have with aerospace is that I don't know if it is too focused or to specialised and maybe there will not be as much opportunity for jobs in the future. But on the other hand, even though mechanical engineering is much more broad and maybe useful when looking for a job I just have a feeling that it is going to be very tedious/boring at times for some reason.

    Well, what do you guys think? Anyone here with any of these degrees or in a similar situation that could let me her their opinion?

    Thanks very much!
    If you havent given aerospace much thought in the past then its probably better to go for mechanical engineering. Some uni's do have a mechanical + aerospace stream where you do some aerospace modules so you could look into that. Overall if you don't have an aerospace degree you can still go into aerospace companies because they need electrical engineers, mechanical engineers, structural etc. but if you wanna build S*** that fly do aero
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    (Original post by kkboyk)
    Have you thought about General Engineering or Integrated Engineering? They basically allow you to do different engineering branches, and specialise in your last year.

    I'd suggest looking at the course modules of each uni you're applying to, which will help you decide. The first year of engineering are pretty much the same for all engineering branch.
    Thanks for he advise, I will definitely look more into this.
    (Original post by alexkol)
    Hey man, I am a mechanical engineer. Mechanical engineering is indeed very broad, in fact the broadest from all the engineering disciplines. Usually the aero classes that you are interested in, you might be able to chose them from a mechanical engineering degree, doing an aero concentration if you may. From my experience Aero and Mech students do target similar jobs and you might have a slight advantage or disadvantage over the others, but it all comes down to your personality and competencies! I would suggest that you choose a degree where you can switch after year 2 ( I know that Leeds allows you to do that), as the first 2 years are similar. Or look into a General Engineering degree, where you can specialize in what you won't to do. The decision is your alone, but I believe that you will not have major issues in finding your desired job in the future, with any of the two. Make sure you look carefully into what modules every Uni offers and that you can chose the ones you want!
    thanks very much this helps a lot... I have a question: did you ever find any part of your ME degree boring or tedious?
    (Original post by Smack)
    Maybe you should be looking at a physics degree of some sort, if it's primarily applied maths that you are interested in.
    Well to be honest I have considered it but engineering is where the jobs are at and I think the amount of maths you do in an engineering degree is plenty
    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    If you havent given aerospace much thought in the past then its probably better to go for mechanical engineering. Some uni's do have a mechanical + aerospace stream where you do some aerospace modules so you could look into that. Overall if you don't have an aerospace degree you can still go into aerospace companies because they need electrical engineers, mechanical engineers, structural etc. but if you wanna build S*** that fly do aero
    Yeah I see the benefit of doing mechanical engineering as it is so broad. My fear is that, because it is so broad you might end up doing work on areas or topics that you don't really like. Whereas in aerospace engineering even though there are less jobs, you still have a pretty good idea of what you'll end up doing after you graduate. For example after I graduate as a ME I may be lucky and find a job where I help design and test parts for an engine ( just an example) or I may not be so lucky and end up in a job where I have to do maintenance to some machinery. However when I think of AE jobs it seems like they all work on the newest technologies available and the jobs seem much more innovative and cutting edge. Am I getting the wrong idea about each degree?
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    (Original post by clfm10)
    Yeah I see the benefit of doing mechanical engineering as it is so broad. My fear is that, because it is so broad you might end up doing work on areas or topics that you don't really like. Whereas in aerospace engineering even though there are less jobs, you still have a pretty good idea of what you'll end up doing after you graduate. For example after I graduate as a ME I may be lucky and find a job where I help design and test parts for an engine ( just an example) or I may not be so lucky and end up in a job where I have to do maintenance to some machinery. However when I think of AE jobs it seems like they all work on the newest technologies available and the jobs seem much more innovative and cutting edge. Am I getting the wrong idea about each degree?
    watch this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1_BeS0QBa8
    also browse through his other videos, he speak to real engineers about what to do in their job and how they find it
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    (Original post by clfm10)
    My fear is that, because it is so broad you might end up doing work on areas or topics that you don't really like.
    You probably will study modules that you do not like, however given the similarities between the two degrees, the modules that you do not like will probably be in aero too, to some extent.

    However when I think of AE jobs it seems like they all work on the newest technologies available and the jobs seem much more innovative and cutting edge. Am I getting the wrong idea about each degree?
    I think you are overestimating certain parts of the aero industry. I've worked with someone from that industry and from what he described it wasn't like that. Don't get sucked into thinking that if you study aero engineering you will have a "cutting edge" job (whatever that means).
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    (Original post by Smack)
    You probably will study modules that you do not like, however given the similarities between the two degrees, the modules that you do not like will probably be in aero too, to some extent.



    I think you are overestimating certain parts of the aero industry. I've worked with someone from that industry and from what he described it wasn't like that. Don't get sucked into thinking that if you study aero engineering you will have a "cutting edge" job (whatever that means).
    yes I have done more research into the subject and I have noticed that Aerospace Engineering seems to contain a lot of computer systems, sensors, communications, avionics etc modules which are very related to electronic engineering and computer science and tbh they don't attract me all that much since I am more interested in forces and mechanics and physical topics so maybe Mechanical Engineering will be the best option... still thinking about it obviously!
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    You need to think yourself "how can I get a job after I've done my course?"

    For the most part your going to have to move around with a Degree in Aerospace Engineering. Now as for Mechanical Engineers they are needed literally every where.
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    Aerospace Engineering seems to contain a lot of computer systems, sensors, communications, avionics etc modules which are very related to electronic engineering and computer stuff
    well unfortunately that's were all the money is at in the real world. In the real world you wont be doing 'mechanics' because there are software that does it way better. look into stuff like finite element analysis. Whether you chose to do aerospace or not you will still have to do electronics and programming. For example in real world if we want to design a new car, well there is already software available to work out forces, vibration, air flow, heat flow etc but the electronics and computer systems dont exist, we have to create them scratch (not really from scratch but you will still need to create it specifically for that car). Recently Tesla only pushed a software update to their cars and all of a sudden they are self driving... I'm just giving you a heads up that the world is changing everything is all about creating new technology if you are interested in just doing mechanics then perhabs take a physics degree..



    (Original post by clfm10)
    yes I have done more research into the subject and I have noticed that Aerospace Engineering seems to contain a lot of computer systems, sensors, communications, avionics etc modules which are very related to electronic engineering and computer science and tbh they don't attract me all that much since I am more interested in forces and mechanics and physical topics so maybe Mechanical Engineering will be the best option... still thinking about it obviously!
    No... mechanical engineering doesnt mean you do 'more mechanics'. I'm first year aero student and I have 2 mechanics modules, where as mech eng have 1. I do the mechanics module that the mech people do and I also have one specific on aircrafts. In fact I would say aerospace do more mechanics than in mechanical engineering, in my second year I have 3 mechanical modules, 1 with mech eng people, one on aircraft mechanics and another one on orbital mechanics (Astronautics) . btw mechanics isn't the fun-est / hardest thing to do, if you really really want mechanics then do civil engineering...
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    (Original post by clfm10)
    yes I have done more research into the subject and I have noticed that Aerospace Engineering seems to contain a lot of computer systems, sensors, communications, avionics etc modules which are very related to electronic engineering and computer science and tbh they don't attract me all that much since I am more interested in forces and mechanics and physical topics so maybe Mechanical Engineering will be the best option... still thinking about it obviously!
    I did a fair bit of electrical, electronics, instrumentation and control in my mechanical degree too. Although, obviously, the lion's share of the degree was based on mechanics of some sort, e.g. solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, etc.
 
 
 
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