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    So it is Fe(s) + I2(s) ->FeI2(s)

    Are group 7 elements in their standard states always I2, Cl2 etc?

    Can it not be 2I(s)?

    Also why is it a solid, should it not be a solid?

    Thanks
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    They're always in their standard states if they're in standard conditions at 298 K. Iodine can exist at separate atoms, i.e. 2I, but they'd have to be as a gas (at a pretty high temp).

    It exists as a solid at RTP due to the strength of the VdW forces.
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    (Original post by Mihael_Keehl)
    So it is Fe(s) + I2(s) ->FeI2(s)

    Are group 7 elements in their standard states always I2, Cl2 etc?

    Can it not be 2I(s)?

    Also why is it a solid, should it not be a solid?

    Thanks
    Hi, yes they are always I2 etc. The solid structure looks like lots of I - I "dumbbells" stacked up.
    And yeah, iodine is a solid at standard conditions.
    Chlorine - gas
    Bromine - liquid
    Iodine - solid


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