Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Medicine 5 or 6 years? watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hi,
    Im a year 11 students thinking about uni etc
    I know that oxford and camridge's medecine degrees take 6 years to complete and im pretty sure other unis do it in 5 years? Why is that? Whats the difference? Thanks 😀
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Shahid786)
    Hi,
    Im a year 11 students thinking about uni etc
    I know that oxford and camridge's medecine degrees take 6 years to complete and im pretty sure other unis do it in 5 years? Why is that? Whats the difference? Thanks 😀
    It's 6 years if you get an "intercalated degree" as well as the standard medical degree. An intercalated degree means you spend a year doing a different degree subject (usually related to medicine) to get a BA or BSc.

    Some universities (eg Oxford and Cambridge) have a compulsory intercalated degree, hence everyone there does a 6-year course. At other universities, intercalation is optional, so the course can either be 5 years or 6 years.
    Online

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    It's 6 years if you get an "intercalated degree" as well as the standard medical degree. An intercalated degree means you spend a year doing a different degree subject (usually related to medicine) to get a BA or BSc.

    Some universities (eg Oxford and Cambridge) have a compulsory intercalated degree, hence everyone there does a 6-year course. At other universities, intercalation is optional, so the course can either be 5 years or 6 years.
    Why? Is there any advantages or benefits to the extra year?
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by SuperHuman98)
    Why? Is there any advantages or benefits to the extra year?
    It's an extra degree that can be of use in applying to future courses, jobs etc. Most of the intercalation options at the universities that offer intercalation are related to medicine or healthcare in some way (e.g. immunology, virology, legal medicine etc.) which can be of use if you want to pursue a particular area further later in life, especially if you want to work in labs.

    I should point out that Oxford, as far as I know, doesn't do an intercalated degree. The third year is spent on a research project. Cambridge on the other hand seems to have the most liberal options with intercalation -- you can do any subject taught at the university, not just a select list of medicine-related ones like at other universities so you could, in theory, do music or theology or something else that's totally unrelated to medicine.

    It should also be noted that the extra year isn't free -- that's more money you're borrowing in student finance. The other consideration to make is (if you're attending an institution where intercalation is optional) how you'll feel being a year behind your peers. This is a problem for some people which is why I personally think that, if you really want to intercalate, you should apply to at least one university where it's compulsory so that cost is the only factor to consider.
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hydeman)
    I should point out that Oxford, as far as I know, doesn't do an intercalated degree. The third year is spent on a research project. Cambridge on the other hand seems to have the most liberal options with intercalation -- you can do any subject taught at the university, not just a select list of medicine-related ones like at other universities so you could, in theory, do music or theology or something else that's totally unrelated to medicine.
    The third year of the Oxford course is the intercalated degree, as far as I know. Tbh, I don't think either Oxford or Cambridge uses the term "intercalated degree" much, because it's a standard part of the course that everyone does.

    Also worth noting that subject freedom has reduced at Cambridge now. Essentially everyone does one of the biological natural sciences.
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SuperHuman98)
    Why? Is there any advantages or benefits to the extra year?
    Gives you points for future job applications.

    Can also give you some research experience (although that can be gained in other ways).
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by SuperHuman98)
    Why? Is there any advantages or benefits to the extra year?
    To increase familiarity with research, a vital part of being a doctor, and to go into more detail in the subject of interest.

    Its also worth a significant amount of CV points.

    (Original post by Hydeman)
    I should point out that Oxford, as far as I know, doesn't do an intercalated degree. The third year is spent on a research project.
    :lolwut: Third year IS an intercalated degree. BA in medical sciences.


    It should also be noted that the extra year isn't free -- that's more money you're borrowing in student finance.
    Its more money you're getting from the NHS bursary for living costs. There are no tuition fees.

    NHS bursary is pretty stingy though so you will need money to cover your living costs yes.

    if you really want to intercalate, you should apply to at least one university where it's compulsory so that cost is the only factor to consider.
    I'd argue perhaps more. Just because intercalation is optional doesn't necessarily mean its an option. At some unis its a competitive process and some people who want to intercalate are unable to.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks for your input everyone... Do you have a link to what courses you can do in your intercalate year? At oxford or cambridge or whatever uni that does it ?
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by Shahid786)
    Thanks for your input everyone... Do you have a link to what courses you can do in your intercalate year? At oxford or cambridge or whatever uni that does it ?
    You'd have to look at the individual universities' websites because they all do it slightly differently and offer different courses.

    (Original post by nexttime)
    :lolwut: Third year IS an intercalated degree. BA in medical sciences.
    I was under the impression that that was the degree you get for all three years of the pre-clinical course, not just the third year. Either way, I don't think it's comparable to what 'intercalated degree' means at other universities given that it's compulsory and there is no subject choice; the latter is clearly not the case at other institutions.

    Its more money you're getting from the NHS bursary for living costs. There are no tuition fees.

    NHS bursary is pretty stingy though so you will need money to cover your living costs yes.
    Alright. It's just that I've seen on a few medical schools' websites that cost is an important factor because the extra year isn't free but I suppose it is if you look at it from the point of view of the NHS paying from fifth year onwards.

    I'd argue perhaps more. Just because intercalation is optional doesn't necessarily mean its an option. At some unis its a competitive process and some people who want to intercalate are unable to.
    Fair enough. Most universities seem to offer intercalation these days anyway, it seem.
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Hydeman)
    I was under the impression that that was the degree you get for all three years of the pre-clinical course, not just the third year.
    Your mark is entirely based on third year.

    Not that that's important - either way it's an extra degree you get for one additional year's work!

    Either way, I don't think it's comparable to what 'intercalated degree' means at other universities given that it's compulsory...
    Technically it isn't - if you've done a degree before you don't do it.

    Plus there are other unis where that's the case as well, not just Oxbridge.

    ...and there is no subject choice; the latter is clearly not the case at other institutions.
    Of course there is. You think you're allocated a lab project at random? :P

    The bulk of the year is actually exam related. There are 5 main options then within each of those there are 8-10 options of which you pick 3. There is also the lab project which can be in anything to do with medical sciences or other related fields e.g. you could do a dissertation in medical history or medical law, plus an extended essay again on anything you like to do with medicine. There are also options in philosophy of science and medical ethics, though those are purely optional.

    I don't know what other schools offer but I think the choice is pretty good...

    Most universities seem to offer intercalation these days anyway, it seem.
    Doesn't mean they necessarily offer it to everyone though...

    I have no idea how these things work at other schools admittedly.
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by nexttime)
    Your mark is entirely based on third year.

    Not that that's important - either way it's an extra degree you get for one additional year's work!

    Technically it isn't - if you've done a degree before you don't do it.

    Plus there are other unis where that's the case as well, not just Oxbridge.

    Of course there is. You think you're allocated a lab project at random? :P

    The bulk of the year is actually exam related. There are 5 main options then within each of those there are 8-10 options of which you pick 3. There is also the lab project which can be in anything to do with medical sciences or other related fields e.g. you could do a dissertation in medical history or medical law, plus an extended essay again on anything you like to do with medicine. There are also options in philosophy of science and medical ethics, though those are purely optional.
    You kind of chopped one of my sentences in half. What I meant by lack of subject choice was that the degree you get at the end of it is the same regardless of what modules you do, whereas at other universities you might get a whole range of degrees being offered. I'm no expert on the finer details of the Oxford course but, if what you say is true, then you graduate with a BA in Medical Sciences no matter what your choice of modules. Admittedly, Medical Sciences is quite a lot broader than Immunology or Virology or something like that, but that's what I was getting at.

    I don't know what other schools offer but I think the choice is pretty good...
    Fair enough.

    Doesn't mean they necessarily offer it to everyone though...

    I have no idea how these things work at other schools admittedly.
    I'll take your word for it but all of the ones I've seen that offer intercalation either offer it to everybody on an optional basis (e.g. Bristol, Exeter etc.) or make it compulsory for everyone (e.g. UCL, Imperial etc.).
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    I believe the 6 year program is better for most medical students. The reason is that completing medicine in 5 is asking for a bit too much, for those interested in research or becoming an academic physician a 6 year program gives them the time to do a bit of research, mature a bit, take time off or just improve their application for foundation years.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: October 28, 2015
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.