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    Hi guys,

    I am looking into taking an Engineering degree through the OU. It's something that has been on my mind for a few years now and I have now decided to take the plunge. The reason for the OU route instead on studying through a traditional university is simply down to practicality. I've read through these forums before and have always been impressed with the knowledge here.

    I was hoping someone with more understanding of these things would be able to advise me. During the course of my research into Engineering degrees I have become aware of the importance of degree accreditation. The OU advises that for Engineering degree Q65 Beng (the qual I am looking to study) "We will beseekingaccreditationto allow you toapply forIEng status or,with furtherlearning, CEngstatus". Am I correct in thinking that in theory, I could undertake this degree, (six years at the quickest!) to then find at the end that it is not accredited?? I apologise if this is obvious to those that read this post but I would just like to clarify this. After all, it is not cheap to study these qualifications and a minimum time allowed of six years means I would like to be sure.

    Thank you to those who read this and are able to offer any input.

    Kind regards.
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    Just giving this a little bump to see if anyone can clear this up for me. Also I noticed the above quote I copy and pasted over seems to have compressed, so to make it easier to read, 'We will be seeking accreditation to allow you to apply for IEng status or, with further learning, CEng status'. Any help would be appreciated.

    Kind regards.
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    Accreditation just means that a degree fulfils the academic requirements of an engineering institution for the award of IEng, CEng (or EngTech). That's not to say you can't get those awards if your degree isn't accredited, it just means it has already been checked. A degree may be accredited by one institution but not another. The OU is big and reputable, and I strongly suspect if they say they're going for accreditation they'll get it (and almost certainly within the next 6 years!)

    I wouldn't let this stop you applying for the course. Are you looking at becoming CEng one day? If so have you looked at M04? Good luck whatever you end up doing!
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    Duncan2012,

    Thank you very much for your prompt and detailed reply. Very helpful. I have looked at the M04. I guess the one thing that has me worried re the Q65 and the M04 is that they take 6 and 8 years to complete respectively. That is quite a long time! When I first checked out Engineering with the OU this minimum period was not in place. I am leaning towards the Q65 simply to get qualified sooner. It may do me a favour to do this and then perhaps think about an Msc later on. I'm no spring chicken and so I have to plan carefully. Many thanks for your help.
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    (Original post by Hike)
    Duncan2012,

    Thank you very much for your prompt and detailed reply. Very helpful. I have looked at the M04. I guess the one thing that has me worried re the Q65 and the M04 is that they take 6 and 8 years to complete respectively. That is quite a long time! When I first checked out Engineering with the OU this minimum period was not in place. I am leaning towards the Q65 simply to get qualified sooner. It may do me a favour to do this and then perhaps think about an Msc later on. I'm no spring chicken and so I have to plan carefully. Many thanks for your help.
    Happy to help. I'm looking into OU degrees myself (though not engineering). Yes, they sound like they'll take a long time, but don't forget the bricks-and-mortar equivalents are 3 and 4 years respectively. As you mention the reason for considering OU is for practicality I'm guess you work full-time? In which case do you have any engineering qualifications (HNC, HND etc?) which could perhaps be 'topped up' to a degree? The OU isn't the only place offering distance learning courses, and depending upon your experience you may be eligible to go straight for a masters level course - have a look at RGU to see the sort of courses available.
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    Yes I do work full time. I don't have any previous Eng related qualifications. I have had a good look at other long distance course providers but the OU seems to be the best for me. Having said that I haven't looked at RGU until now so thanks for the suggestion. What are you looking at doing at the OU?
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    (Original post by Hike)
    Yes I do work full time. I don't have any previous Eng related qualifications. I have had a good look at other long distance course providers but the OU seems to be the best for me. Having said that I haven't looked at RGU until now so thanks for the suggestion. What are you looking at doing at the OU?
    Either graduate entry law or a languages course. I've just finished a part-time MBA at RGU and really liked the ability study around my [full-time] job. Have you worked in engineering roles before? What's your work history? It may be that you have enough experience to go straight to an MSc.
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    My work history is completely unrelated to Engineering. MBA through the OU is the other course I am looking at. I notice you have a few Engineering qualifications. Is you desire to study Law or languages to further an engineering career or are you looking at a career change?
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    Both of those courses would help in my career but I would primarily be doing them for personal development and interest. Not trying to convince you to change your plans, but the OU MBA is very highly regarded, takes less time and may open a few more doors (compared to engineering) for you, plus you'd get to use the skills and techniques in your current job while you study. It really comes down to where you want your career to go. Who knows, you could end up doing both :-)
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    I had thought about doing both. An MBA is certainly more applicable to my current career. It all comes down to cost and timing. However people want to dress it up, education is not cheap. Good luck with whichever course you choose to go with. Law would be my choice. You don't need a qualification in a language to be able to speak it and simply having another language is an advantage in most professions. Maybe you could learn via a cheaper method? Law however will require the qualification to prove you know your onions.
 
 
 
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