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    How much maths would there be in a bsc econ course at UCL or warwick? I know it's a fair amount but specifically how much( like in terms of percentages compared to essays) and what kind of maths is involved? Is it mainly a-level maths or is it advanced?
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    (Original post by _JOKER_)
    How much maths would there be in a bsc econ course at UCL or warwick? I know it's a fair amount but specifically how much( like in terms of percentages) and what kind of maths is involved? Is it mainly a-level maths or is it advanced?
    I don't know this for a fact (I am still doing A-levels), but from what I have heard, Cambridge has the most with UCL having about the second most. I haven't heard anything specifically about Warwick but I would imagine its got less maths as it doesn't require an A* in it. LSE has quite a bit of maths (I have access to the past papers) but it's not an insane amount from what I saw, depending on the modules you pick.
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    (Original post by OrionMusicNet)
    I don't know this for a fact (I am still doing A-levels), but from what I have heard, Cambridge has the most with UCL having about the second most. I haven't heard anything specifically about Warwick but I would imagine its got less maths as it doesn't require an A* in it. LSE has quite a bit of maths (I have access to the past papers) but it's not an insane amount from what I saw, depending on the modules you pick.
    Do you know if the maths is a-level stuff or advanced
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    (Original post by _JOKER_)
    Do you know if the maths is a-level stuff or advanced
    Based on the LSE syllabus for one of their compulsory first year modules for economics, I would be highly surprised if it was A-level stuff. Matrices, reduced row echelon form, rank. Systems of linear equations, Gaussian elimination. Determinants. Vector spaces, linear independence, basis, dimension. Linear transformations, similarity. Eigenvalues. Diagonalization. Orthogonal diagonalization. Complex numbers. Vectors. Functions of several variables, derivatives, gradients, tangent hyperplanes. Optimisation including Lagrange's method. Vector-valued functions, derivatives and their manipulation. Inverse functions, local inverses and critical points, use in transformations. Integration, differential and difference equations.

    Most of that stuff is not in the A-level syllabus, and any of it that is will almost certainly be made more complex. I would say that if you aren't that comfortable with maths (comfortable enough with it to be fine knowing most of your degree will include a lot of it) then it wouldn't be a good idea to go for the course. If you can make the grades for the course though then, assuming you don't hate maths, I don't see why choosing the course would be a problem. This is just my opinion though based largely on what I have heard from other people and researched about the course.
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    (Original post by OrionMusicNet)
    Based on the LSE syllabus for one of their compulsory first year modules for economics, I would be highly surprised if it was A-level stuff. Matrices, reduced row echelon form, rank. Systems of linear equations, Gaussian elimination. Determinants. Vector spaces, linear independence, basis, dimension. Linear transformations, similarity. Eigenvalues. Diagonalization. Orthogonal diagonalization. Complex numbers. Vectors. Functions of several variables, derivatives, gradients, tangent hyperplanes. Optimisation including Lagrange's method. Vector-valued functions, derivatives and their manipulation. Inverse functions, local inverses and critical points, use in transformations. Integration, differential and difference equations.

    Most of that stuff is not in the A-level syllabus, and any of it that is will almost certainly be made more complex. I would say that if you aren't that comfortable with maths (comfortable enough with it to be fine knowing most of your degree will include a lot of it) then it wouldn't be a good idea to go for the course. If you can make the grades for the course though then, assuming you don't hate maths, I don't see why choosing the course would be a problem. This is just my opinion though based largely on what I have heard from other people and researched about the course.
    Ahh Thanks for the detailed answer, really appreciate it.
    I really like maths so that's not the problem. It's the essay writing, i dont mind writing essays at a-level standard but anything more might trouble me.
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    (Original post by _JOKER_)
    Ahh Thanks for the detailed answer, really appreciate it.
    I really like maths so that's not the problem. It's the essay writing, i dont mind writing essays at a-level standard but anything more might trouble me.
    I wouldn't worry about that for an Economics degree at UCL or Warwick haha.
 
 
 
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