Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    what will happen to our body cells if there is too much sugar in the blood? as in diabetic wise
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    And its not because we're diabetic?

    We'll take it up into cells and metabolise it. If levels are high enough a small amount might make it into the urine.

    You do specifically say 'too much' though which makes me intrigued as to what kind of scenario we have here. Absorbing it through the oral route would not lead to any acute problems, aside perhaps nausea. If we're pumping someone full of 50% dextrose for the lulz... well I expect the fatal factor would be either electrolyte imbalance, specifically low sodium and potassium. You'd also have a problem with intracellular dehydration if it was going in quick enough. If that didn't get you the elevated plasma viscosity would - you blood would essentially be honey mixed with proteins - it'll be quite difficult to forced that around narrow blood vessels.
    • Study Helper
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by nexttime)
    And its not because we're diabetic?

    We'll take it up into cells and metabolise it. If levels are high enough a small amount might make it into the urine.

    You do specifically say 'too much' though which makes me intrigued as to what kind of scenario we have here. Absorbing it through the oral route would not lead to any acute problems, aside perhaps nausea. If we're pumping someone full of 50% dextrose for the lulz... well I expect the fatal factor would be either electrolyte imbalance, specifically low sodium and potassium. You'd also have a problem with intracellular dehydration if it was going in quick enough. If that didn't get you the elevated plasma viscosity would - you blood would essentially be honey mixed with proteins - it'll be quite difficult to forced that around narrow blood vessels.
    Would you not also get a hypo/hyper? Always forget which way round.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    no as in diabetic sorry
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Andy98)
    Would you not also get a hypo/hyper? Always forget which way round.
    Hyperglycemia just means high blood sugar in medicine jargon. It can cause various problems but generally not a discrete episode in the same way as the opposite.

    You are thinking of hypoglycemia, which is low blood sugar, and is associated with confusion, drowsiness and ultimately death. It should not happen in normal people and is most commonly associated with taking too much insulin.
    • Study Helper
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by nexttime)
    Hyperglycemia just means high blood sugar in medicine jargon.

    You are thinking of hypoglycemia, which is low blood sugar, and is associated with confusion, drowsiness and ultimately death. It should not happen in normal people and is most commonly associated with taking too much insulin.
    Then why did I get taught in first aid that they can have "fit"-like symptoms?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    An uncontrolled diabetic cannot process the sugar that ends up in the blood in normal digestion.
    Therefore they (effectively). Start to feed on stored fat and muscle, loosing weight as the energy that would normally be delivered gets "stuck" in the blood.

    The sugar in the blood then begins to thicken up as it keeps increasing, and this can lead to all sorts of issues that are circulation based, eyesight, etc
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Andy98)
    Then why did I get taught in first aid that they can have "fit"-like symptoms?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Both hypo and hyperglycaemia can lead to 'fit' like symptoms. If you're hypoglycaemic, then your brain doesn't get any metabolic substrate (and the brain is poor at utilising anything other than glucose), so you're more prone to cerebral dysfunction.

    If you're hyper, the question is usually why? Hyperglycaemia itself can cause metabolic abnormalities that can lead to convulsions, however, as my esteemed colleague has already told you, excessively high levels of glucose can damage capillary beds, and some of the excess glucose may be metabolised by alternative pathways which produce slightly more toxic substances than normal aerobic respiration would. This, combined with the raised viscosity of the blood can lead to 'fit' like symptoms.

    It's more common in hypoglycaemia though.
    • Study Helper
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by Hippysnake)
    Both hypo and hyperglycaemia can lead to 'fit' like symptoms. If you're hypoglycaemic, then your brain doesn't get any metabolic substrate (and the brain is poor at utilising anything other than glucose), so you're more prone to cerebral dysfunction.

    If you're hyper, the question is usually why? Hyperglycaemia itself can cause metabolic abnormalities that can lead to convulsions, however, as my esteemed colleague has already told you, excessively high levels of glucose can damage capillary beds, and some of the excess glucose may be metabolised by alternative pathways which produce slightly more toxic substances than normal aerobic respiration would. This, combined with the raised viscosity of the blood can lead to 'fit' like symptoms.

    It's more common in hypoglycaemia though.
    Ahhh, that makes sense

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Andy98)
    Then why did I get taught in first aid that they can have "fit"-like symptoms?
    I was not intending to provide a comprehensive list of symptoms of a hypo - they can be pretty broad and is always worth considering in a known diabetic or anyone critically unwell.

    I would suggest patient.co.uk as a very accessible source if you wish to know more.
    • Study Helper
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by nexttime)
    I was not intending to provide a comprehensive list of symptoms of a hypo - they can be pretty broad and is always worth considering in a known diabetic or anyone critically unwell.

    I would suggest patient.co.uk as a very accessible source if you wish to know more.
    Fair enough
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: November 2, 2015
Poll
Do you like carrot cake?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.