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    I've been looking into starting University, with a foundation year, as a mature student.
    The one thing I'm worried about, other than whether I'm up to the challenge of the course, is money to live on (also, the rip off text books and ****).

    According to the Student Finance calculator, I'd only really get enough Maintenance Loan to cover accommodation...

    So not only would I have to worry about getting a job (which is difficult enough without having to worry about what hours you can work), but be able to study, work and not burn out, all the while worrying about money.

    Is it even worth bothering?


    I also fail to see what my parents earn, or what I earn in a job I wont have once I'm learning has any bearing on how I'd be able to live once a student.
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    (Original post by Kurtle)
    I've been looking into starting University, with a foundation year, as a mature student.
    The one thing I'm worried about, other than whether I'm up to the challenge of the course, is money to live on (also, the rip off text books and ****).

    According to the Student Finance calculator, I'd only really get enough Maintenance Loan to cover accommodation...

    So not only would I have to worry about getting a job (which is difficult enough without having to worry about what hours you can work), but be able to study, work and not burn out, all the while worrying about money.

    Is it even worth bothering?


    I also fail to see what my parents earn, or what I earn in a job I wont have once I'm learning has any bearing on how I'd be able to live once a student.
    Yeah students say this every year, but unfortunately it's just the way it is so no point getting up in arms about it. SFE simply don't care.


    First of all is that definitely the cheapest accommodation? I only say this because I constantly see people complaining about only just being able to afford accommodation, then it turns out they have chosen en suite or luxury places. If it is definitely the cheapest accommodation maybe look into shared housing which is usually cheaper, often by a lot.

    Finding a part time job can in student cities usually be pretty easy, however I do agree it is worrying when it's not guaranteed you will definitely find one. Look into getting a student overdraft to tide you over while you find a job. And remember you can't afford to be picky. But even just 5 hours a week can give you an extra £30 which while not enough for luxuries it is definitely enough to afford to eat.

    If this is still a worry for you then maybe look into deferring for a year, work your butt off in the year in between and save some money. If you're smart about it you could save enough money to last you the whole 3 years.

    As for text books, unless you KNOW you need them. Don't buy them. Most decent universities will have a library with many copies of essential text books. I'm in my second year of Biomedical sciences and have never run into trouble finding a textbook or needing to buy one. So yeah, unless you find yourself constantly need to check one out the library or there are shortages then don't bother buying it. Also if you do buy one, do your best to get it second hand. No reason you should have to pay full price if there are alternatives.
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    (Original post by Kurtle)
    I've been looking into starting University, with a foundation year, as a mature student.
    The one thing I'm worried about, other than whether I'm up to the challenge of the course, is money to live on (also, the rip off text books and ****).

    According to the Student Finance calculator, I'd only really get enough Maintenance Loan to cover accommodation...

    So not only would I have to worry about getting a job (which is difficult enough without having to worry about what hours you can work), but be able to study, work and not burn out, all the while worrying about money.

    Is it even worth bothering?


    I also fail to see what my parents earn, or what I earn in a job I wont have once I'm learning has any bearing on how I'd be able to live once a student.
    You say you are a mature student- how old are you exactly? At 25+ your parents income is no longer assessed- only that of any partner should you have one. Other criteria for not having your parents income assessed includes having worked for 3 years earning £7,500 or more, being estranged from parents, being married or having a child dependent.

    Plenty of students are in your position or worse (not even getting enough to pay for their accomodation)- they get jobs and they still have a good social life and do well at uni so it is totally doable.

    The thing is that with a limited pot of money any extra that can be given out needs to be targeted at those from low income backgrounds.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    First of all is that definitely the cheapest accommodation? I only say this because I constantly see people complaining about only just being able to afford accommodation, then it turns out they have chosen en suite or luxury places. If it is definitely the cheapest accommodation maybe look into shared housing which is usually cheaper, often by a lot.

    Finding a part time job can in student cities usually be pretty easy, however I do agree it is worrying when it's not guaranteed you will definitely find one. Look into getting a student overdraft to tide you over while you find a job. And remember you can't afford to be picky. But even just 5 hours a week can give you an extra £30 which while not enough for luxuries it is definitely enough to afford to eat.

    If this is still a worry for you then maybe look into deferring for a year, work your butt off in the year in between and save some money. If you're smart about it you could save enough money to last you the whole 3 years.

    As for text books, unless you KNOW you need them. Don't buy them. Most decent universities will have a library with many copies of essential text books. I'm in my second year of Biomedical sciences and have never run into trouble finding a textbook or needing to buy one. So yeah, unless you find yourself constantly need to check one out the library or there are shortages then don't bother buying it. Also if you do buy one, do your best to get it second hand. No reason you should have to pay full price if there are alternatives.
    Well I'll start by saying that it's actually a 5 year course, including the foundation :P

    Thank you for the reply though.

    To be fair, I've only looked at college residences, which is about £4,800 and £500 more with an en-suite. Money problems would be a disaster though, especially half-way through a degree.



    (Original post by jelly1000)
    You say you are a mature student- how old are you exactly? At 25+ your parents income is no longer assessed- only that of any partner should you have one. Other criteria for not having your parents income assessed includes having worked for 3 years earning £7,500 or more, being estranged from parents, being married or having a child dependent.

    Plenty of students are in your position or worse (not even getting enough to pay for their accomodation)- they get jobs and they still have a good social life and do well at uni so it is totally doable.

    The thing is that with a limited pot of money any extra that can be given out needs to be targeted at those from low income backgrounds.
    I'm 27, but would be 28. There wasn't anything about age or specifically personal earnings on the Govt. calculator I used, just household income (i.e. my parents + me)...
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    (Original post by Kurtle)
    Well I'll start by saying that it's actually a 5 year course, including the foundation :P

    Thank you for the reply though.

    To be fair, I've only looked at college residences, which is about £4,800 and £500 more with an en-suite. Money problems would be a disaster though, especially half-way through a degree.
    Ah okay fair enough, even still taking a year out and saving up could still help massively . Because then if you work during uni you would just be topping up your savings as you use them.

    I have no idea what area of the country you're planing to study at, so can't say whether the accommodation is a rip off. But In my area that would be considered a rip off. I paid about 3.7k for my uni accommodation and my student house now is about 2.7k + £500 for bills. But this varies by areas. But student housing is almost always cheaper.

    Yes it would be stressful having money problems half way through your course, which is why it's best to start coming up with a budget and a plan NOW.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    I have no idea what area of the country you're planing to study at, so can't say whether the accommodation is a rip off. But In my area that would be considered a rip off. I paid about 3.7k for my uni accommodation and my student house now is about 2.7k + £500 for bills. But this varies by areas. But student housing is almost always cheaper.
    Almost certainly a rip-off then (Durham).
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    You'll get the full maintenance loan which is £8200 per year. You'll also get a bursary from the uni. Not too sure what though; as this varies by uni.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    You'll get the full maintenance loan which is £8200 per year. You'll also get a bursary from the uni. Not too sure what though; as this varies by uni.
    Are you sure?
    Although it's the 2015/16 year, it knows my age etc:
    http://www.studentfinance.direct.gov...gibility.xhtml

    And according to this:
    https://www.staidans.co.uk/wp-conten...s_sfe_1516.pdf

    a full Maintainance Loan outside London is only £5,740
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    I spent £75 per week at university (food, toiletries, transport, direct debits, general spending). By going private rather than university owned you can also more than halve your accommodation cost.
 
 
 
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