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    Hi, I'd like some info about the courses of Physics and Philosophy. What is it like to be a student for either of the two subjects? How interesting are the subjects and how is your social life affected by them. Moreover I'd like to know the career opportunities for each degree.
    I'm trying to figure out which of the two is best suited for me but I find it hard to decide since both excite and interest me. I hope any answers I get will clear the way and help me make a choice. Thank you.
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    (Original post by Mojum)
    Hi, I'd like some info about the courses of Physics and Philosophy. What is it like to be a student for either of the two subjects? How interesting are the subjects and how is your social life affected by them. Moreover I'd like to know the career opportunities for each degree.
    I'm trying to figure out which of the two is best suited for me but I find it hard to decide since both excite and interest me. I hope any answers I get will clear the way and help me make a choice. Thank you.
    You realise that you can combine the two? Aberdeen, Bristol, KCL, Leeds, Manchester, Nottingham, Oxford, Royal Holloway, Sheffield, St Andrews and York all do physics with / and philosophy.
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    (Original post by Origami Bullets)
    You realise that you can combine the two? Aberdeen, Bristol, KCL, Leeds, Manchester, Nottingham, Oxford, Royal Holloway, Sheffield, St Andrews and York all do physics with / and philosophy.
    Yeah i do know that however some of the universities i'm applying to don't have such courses. Does doing both physics and philosophy mean that you are taught the full course for both subjects as if you were doing each separately or am I going to miss out on some of the chapters for each subject?
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    (Original post by Mojum)
    Yeah i do know that however some of the universities i'm applying to don't have such courses. Does doing both physics and philosophy mean that you are taught the full course for both subjects as if you were doing each separately or am I going to miss out on some of the chapters for each subject?
    Whatever subject / combination of subjects you pick, you'll always end up doing 120 credits worth of modules per year i.e. the same amount of work in total.

    If you do a single subject, all or almost all of those credits will be spent on that subject. If you do X and Y, you'll spend half your time on each. If you do X with Y then there will have a 66:33 or 75:25 split between the two.

    Degrees aren't taught in the same way as A Levels - there are no chapters in a book to doggedly work your way through. Each uni writes and examines its own modules, so there are significant differences in terms of course content between unis. Each module is essentially a standalone course on a particular topic, and while some will be compulsory the others can largely be mixed and matched.

    I would decide what course you want to do, and then decide which unis you want to apply to. There's no point putting the cart before the horse and then realising that you're not happy studying the course you eventually picked.
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    (Original post by Origami Bullets)
    Whatever subject / combination of subjects you pick, you'll always end up doing 120 credits worth of modules per year i.e. the same amount of work in total.

    If you do a single subject, all or almost all of those credits will be spent on that subject. If you do X and Y, you'll spend half your time on each. If you do X with Y then there will have a 66:33 or 75:25 split between the two.

    Degrees aren't taught in the same way as A Levels - there are no chapters in a book to doggedly work your way through. Each uni writes and examines its own modules, so there are significant differences in terms of course content between unis. Each module is essentially a standalone course on a particular topic, and while some will be compulsory the others can largely be mixed and matched.

    I would decide what course you want to do, and then decide which unis you want to apply to. There's no point putting the cart before the horse and then realising that you're not happy studying the course you eventually picked.
    So would I be in a disadvantage if I did Physics and Philosophy since those who do physics will know more about it than me and those who do philosophy will also know more as I'll be doing half of each course?
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    (Original post by Mojum)
    So would I be in a disadvantage if I did Physics and Philosophy since those who do physics will know more about it than me and those who do philosophy will also know more as I'll be doing half of each course?
    Of course you will know less than those who specialise in one or the other. On the other hand, you have the advantage of knowing things about which they are totally clueless.
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    (Original post by ageshallnot)
    Of course you will know less than those who specialise in one or the other. On the other hand, you have the advantage of knowing things about which they are totally clueless.
    Why would I be learning things that the others won't? Isn't the combined course parts of each individual one?
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    (Original post by Mojum)
    Why would I be learning things that the others won't? Isn't the combined course parts of each individual one?
    Because the straight physicists won't be learning philosophy and vice versa...
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    (Original post by Mojum)
    Why would I be learning things that the others won't? Isn't the combined course parts of each individual one?
    Generally there are two sorts of joint honours course; those that exist because you can mix and match any two subjects the university offers and those that have been specially created. The latter usually have a cross-over module.

    PS Are you sure you are indecisive? Might it just be a phase.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Generally there are two sorts of joint honours course; those that exist because you can mix and match any two subjects the university offers and those that have been specially created. The latter usually have a cross-over module.

    PS Are you sure you are indecisive? Might it just be a phase.
    I'm pretty sure I'm indecisive. I've always enjoyed learning about how things work (physics) but growing up I wondered about why things work (philosophy) to the point where both questions are equally intriguing to me. I mean I'd love to know more about quantum physics and the cosmos but at the same time I'd love to learn about how language is used in such context and how such theories were derived in the first place or even about human behavior etc.
 
 
 
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