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    Hi guys I am planning to take a combination of Sciences and Humanities at A level and I'm curious to know is there such thing as a Scientist Lawyer?? If so how would I become one
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    Intellectual property is a known legal practice area that attracts scientists or people with that kind of background, often where they are working with patents, designs and trademarks (especially when working with clients in the pharmaceutical sector).

    You could also look into becoming a patent attorney (which I know a lot less about so will leave it at that!).

    The work is very much that it a lawyer but the subject matter will have more of a scientific edge in these areas.


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    (Original post by known_syndicate)
    Hi guys I am planning to take a combination of Sciences and Humanities at A level and I'm curious to know is there such thing as a Scientist Lawyer?? If so how would I become one
    Expanding on what J-SP said: patent law is an area of law which protects inventions/discoveries and gives the inventor a monopoly over said invention. The patent's validity and its ability to protect the inventor's monopoly hinges a lot on extremely technical/scientific aspects, such as defining substances and understanding how things work; hence science graduates (even those with PHDs) are frequently recruited to become patent lawyers.

    If I can recall correctly from my IP law textbook, it costs on average in the UK £50k to draft and obtain a valid patent from the UK IPO (or European one, I can't remember), and £150k for a 3-day high court trial regarding a patent - there's big money in this area of law, if you're curious.
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    To answer your question... Yes... I am a scientist who later trained to become a lawyer... a barrister specifically. I have degrees in Biology, Molecular Biology Analytical Chemistry and Law.

    You of course would not have to take my circuitous, long winded approach to the law... However I do recommend a good grounding in each discipline (science and law).

    I am not currently a patent attorney, however I do find that my scientific training is a valuable asset in all the work that I do.

    I approach most tasks with a very analytical perspective, relying on years of training of how to approach and tackle complex problems; deconstructing them into palatable bites.

    I would recommend taking a science degree and then maybe do a year or two in industry, in order to get a practical grasp. Then apply to do either an accelerated LLB or perhaps a GDL.

    If patent law is for you, your practical experience will suit you well, as you will have a fundamental and elemental grasp...as it were... of the subject matter.

    If civil or criminal law is your preference, then certain skills (as explained above) will also be transferable.

    Whatever your choice, good luck on your future endeavours.
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    Patent Attorney, or you could become a lawyer through a normal firm and then specialise afterwards in IP law.

    The two are very different roles and whereas a patent attorney is usually involved in drafting and prosecuting patent applications, an IP lawyer is often more involved in contentious matters and ip transactions (I think)...I'm training as a patent attorney FYI.
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    (Original post by known_syndicate)
    Hi guys I am planning to take a combination of Sciences and Humanities at A level and I'm curious to know is there such thing as a Scientist Lawyer?? If so how would I become one
    I am in a similar position as you.

    I am in my second year of my Law Degree and have developed a great interest in science (I took Forensic Medicine as one of my credits in 1st year and loved it !)

    Therefore, I am thinking about pursuing a career in the Scottish Fatalities Investigation Unit (in England and Wales it is the Coroners Office). In this, solicitors have to opportunity to consult with Pathologists, Forensic Odontologists etc and invesitgate any suspicious deaths within their jurisdiction. This involves a lot of crime scene work which could satisfy your desire to continue with the Science aspect of your academic life.

    Hope this Helps !
 
 
 
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