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    Do you agree with the tax on female sanitary items? I think it's absolutely ridiculous. They are essential for us females for at least 30years of our lives so why should we be taxed? I'm sure most girls would agree that we'd much rather not have periods and still be fertile, but that's not our choice. Sanitary towels and tampons are already expensive, they should be lowering the price, not increase the price by adding tax.


    http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/...-10045629.html
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    What?!!! Are they having a laugh, periods are something out of our control
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    How can they consider that as a luxury? Are we expected to use cloths???
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    Honestly, sanitary items really shouldn't be taxed. Yes, they are currently taxed at 5% -- the minimum rate apparently, but it's still too much.
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    Because they are a luxury - we could always free flow we choose to wear them.

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    This is an argument I once saw used. No uterus no opinion :hand:
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    It's ridiculous. But our government is powerless to scrap the tax as EU rules state they must be taxed at a minimum of 5% - which is indeed the rate at which they are taxed. We are already taxing them at the lowest possible rate as members of the EU.

    Btw, the EU considers tampons a luxury; but Jaffa Cakes are not and thus are tax-free.


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    (Original post by samina_ay)
    How can they consider that as a luxury? Are we expected to use cloths???
    I have no idea. Perhaps we should bare all and bleed through our clothes
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    True - it is our decision to use sanitary products but that doesn't mean they should put tax on it. If these products are tax free:[*]-Baby wear, children’s clothing and children’s footwear[*]-Books, newspapers and magazines[*]-Printed or copied music[*]-Caravans (depending on their size)[*]-Water supplied to homes[*]-Donated goods sold in charity shops.

    .........Then why cant sanitary products be??????
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    What a ridiculous EU policy. That's so stupid and ill thought out. How on earth can that be considered a luxury, surely they are essential!
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    Tampon-tax is catchy!

    But seriously, how are tampons a luxury? :confused: Do they want women to bleed on the streets? I think that would be a funny way to protest.
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    I've never quite understood their classification as a luxury item myself, though since I started using a menstrual cup instead, I no longer have to buy them, and I've already saved plenty of money in doing so!
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    (Original post by clonedmemories)
    I've never quite understood their classification as a luxury item myself, though since I started using a menstrual cup instead, I no longer have to buy them, and I've already saved plenty of money in doing so!
    Yeah but some would see that as a little invasive, especially since girls are maturing earlier so we can't expect 9/10/11 year old girls to insert a cup into themselves.
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    Does anyone know a clear outlook on this issue. As far as i can gather the problem is that tampons are taxed 5%, while other items arent. This tax is an eu regulation. Tampons are already taxed at a reduced rate.

    The issue is that Tampons should be untaxed.

    Is there an argument why tampons should be taxed?
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    (Original post by Farm_Ecology)
    Does anyone know a clear outlook on this issue. As far as i can gather the problem is that tampons are taxed 5%, while other items arent. This tax is an eu regulation. Tampons are already taxed at a reduced rate.

    The issue is that Tampons should be untaxed.

    Is there an argument why tampons should be taxed?
    The argument is that they are considered a 'luxury' therefore suggesting that they are not essential
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Yeah but some would see that as a little invasive, especially since girls are maturing earlier so we can't expect 9/10/11 year old girls to insert a cup into themselves.
    I'd agree with regards to pads, but not tampons. I certainly wouldn't have used anything insertable at 11 when I started (and my mother was always against it since she had a TSS scare when she was younger) but I made the move to tampons since I did a lot of acting and gymnastics, and I hated the thought of feeling self-conscious about wearing a pad while I was performing, and found them much more comfortable. However, I found a cup even more comfortable than them and it's certainly less risky and more environmentally friendly, and cheaper in the long run (since a cup is designed to last ~7 years).
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    Yeah, it's amazing.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    The argument is that they are considered a 'luxury' therefore suggesting that they are not essential
    Thats ridiuclous. There are a lot of things that are taxed that shouldnt be: like toothpaste.

    These are essential items, and shouldnt be considered luxury.
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    I bet a man decided on that tax. Let's all bleed freely in public and then ask them if sanitary products are still a luxury.
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    (Original post by Farm_Ecology)
    Does anyone know a clear outlook on this issue. As far as i can gather the problem is that tampons are taxed 5%, while other items arent. This tax is an eu regulation. Tampons are already taxed at a reduced rate.

    The issue is that Tampons should be untaxed.

    Is there an argument why tampons should be taxed?
    While I don't know any arguments, I can suggest what the issue might be. The EU works on the basis that items are to be taxed unless they are given a specific exemption. That works well as a general economic policy, as it ensures that states are able to raise taxes widely on goods without having to seek authorisation from the EU with respect to each one. The purpose is to ensure alike treatment in member states as a part of the internal market, hence why it is so difficult to gain an derogation/exception (which the government ruled out as too unlikely to happen a while ago). To gain a specific exemption from tax provisions, one needs to apply to the EU legislator. I haven't looked into the exact means of regulation, but assuming it is the normal one, then for the EU legislator to pass the exemption into law, they need the unanimous agreement of all member states. Assuming that the elected representatives accurately represent the opinions of their people, that means that the majority of the people, and the majority of the government, in each of the 27 member states needs to support the measure. Therefore, if any majority in any of the member states do not consider tampons 'essential' (hence making them a 'luxury', a term that might better be described as 'non-necessary'), then the exemption cannot be obtained. An opinion like that could arise for any number of reason, perhaps (and this is one a think is most probable) from something as simple as the national majority in a particular member state preferring other sanitary products to tampons as a cultural norm - therefore, to them, tampons are 'non-necessary', because other products are preferred instead. That is not to say that they would consider sanitary products as a whole 'non-necessary', of course they would consider them essential, but the issue has arisen because we here consider each product in isolation, not under the general category of 'sanitary product'.

    That's just my guess as to why the law is as it is, not my personal opinion as to how it should be. Personally, I'd support any attempt to abolish the tax by gaining an exemption.
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    Yes it is stupid that they are taxed.

    But so are a lot of thing. Like how are clothes a luxury?
 
 
 
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