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    So i'm in year 13 and I've chosen to apply for a degree in econ and then probably get a job in the finance job. But I've heard most of the jobs in the finance sector are really boring and stressful. One career that looks interesting to me is the chemical/petroleum engineering sector. I've got no idea what I want to do as a job.I've had work experience at an accountants firm but I've had no insight in a engineering field. So what kind of thing does a chemical engineer essentially do and do you consider it more interesting than a job in finance? or are there any jobs in the finance sector that are not boring and not stressful and pay well? Also is a career in chemical engineering promising, interesting and pays well?
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    (Original post by _JOKER_)
    So i'm in year 13 and I've chosen to apply for a degree in econ and then probably get a job in the finance job. But I've heard most of the jobs in the finance sector are really boring and stressful. One career that looks interesting to me is the chemical/petroleum engineering sector. I've got no idea what I want to do as a job.I've had work experience at an accountants firm but I've had no insight in a engineering field. So what kind of thing does a chemical engineer essentially do and do you consider it more interesting than a job in finance? or are there any jobs in the finance sector that are not boring and not stressful and pay well? Also is a career in chemical engineering promising, interesting and pays well?
    First off how would you get into the chemical engineering field without an accredited degree?
    I'm no expert but I'm fairly sure you'll need one. Perhaps you could do some kind of masters?
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    (Original post by lowhigh)
    First off how would you get into the chemical engineering field without an accredited degree?
    I'm no expert but I'm fairly sure you'll need one. Perhaps you could do some kind of masters?
    I'm still in the process of applying for a degree. So I can choose to do a degree in econ or chem eng. If i do econ i'll go for a job in finance but if i do chem eng i'll go for petroleum or chemical eng. I need help on deciding if a job in finance will be engaging not boring, not highly stressful and pays well
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    Well u do find chemical engineers in Finance... tbh because the engineering skill set can be used in finance.

    However unless you do an economics / finance type role in an engineering company you can't do the engineering aspects from a economics/ finance background...
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    (Original post by ebam_uk)
    Well u do find chemical engineers in Finance... tbh because the engineering skill set can be used in finance.

    However unless you do an economics / finance type role in an engineering company you can't do the engineering aspects from a economics/ finance background...
    That's true. Do you know any jobs that i can do with an econ degree that's not boring, pays well and not highly stressful
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    (Original post by _JOKER_)
    I'm still in the process of applying for a degree. So I can choose to do a degree in econ or chem eng. If i do econ i'll go for a job in finance but if i do chem eng i'll go for petroleum or chemical eng. I need help on deciding if a job in finance will be engaging not boring, not highly stressful and pays well
    Don't do petroleum engineering... the oil is going to run out in 60 years max and we will shift to renewables (e.g. nuclear) until that time as oil gets too expensive.
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    I think that would depend on the needs of the economy? if you're truly interested in petroleum then it'd probably be better to work somewhere in the middle east?. Finance on the other hand is quite a flexible job or industry because it is necessary to most companies. These are just my thoughts though
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    (Original post by _JOKER_)
    That's true. Do you know any jobs that i can do with an econ degree that's not boring, pays well and not highly stressful
    Well most jobs are stressful to being with ( especially as a graduate), the trick is to try to do something you might enjoy so you don't feel the stress as much whether its a middle office role in a bank's finance team ie avoid the stress of front office ( trading or M&A type roles), of course the higher stress jobs tend to pay more.

    But if compromise a little and avoid the million pound front office jobs, most investment banking jobs are pretty well paid still just not jaw dropping big like pre-recession front office jobs..
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    (Original post by ebam_uk)
    Well most jobs are stressful to being with ( especially as a graduate), the trick is to try to do something you might enjoy
    Note, the stress doesn't get any less as you progress through your career. So the advice about doing something you enjoy is important....

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    (Original post by jneill)
    Note, the stress doesn't get any less as you progress through your career. So the advice about doing something you enjoy is important....

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Apparently the drop out rate of bankers is interesting, so it might be a case of taking a few years of stress ( & capitalising on the higher salary and get substantial savings to do what you want) if further study eg Masters/ MBA or pursuit of another career. I have noticed people changing careers as the stress isn't quite sustainable over ones whole life!
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    (Original post by Spelly456)
    Don't do petroleum engineering... the oil is going to run out in 60 years max and we will shift to renewables (e.g. nuclear) until that time as oil gets too expensive.
    What are you talking about? Oil still has 100 years to live nothwithstanding technological innovations and advancements
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    (Original post by Spelly456)
    Don't do petroleum engineering... the oil is going to run out in 60 years max and we will shift to renewables (e.g. nuclear) until that time as oil gets too expensive.
    I am studying Pet Eng, and whilst I am by no means an expert on the subject my lecturers are.

    On average we currently extract 30% of the oil from an average oil reservoir leaving the remaining 70% in place.
    Globally we currently produce around 88 Million barrels of oil a day, and assuming we stop all oil exploration, and research and development into increasing the extraction rate beyond 30% we would run out of oil in around 47 years, but that's not going to happen.

    Most of the scaremongering, and confusion comes from a lack of understanding about what the term "oil reserves" means, with many assuming it refers to the amount of oil in the ground, but in reality it refers to the amount of oil that is currently economically, and technologically viable to extract which as previously stated is normally 30% of the oil in the ground.

    Most experts agree we have already discovered around 70-80% of the worlds oil, and gas reserves, but even so those remaining undiscovered reserves combined with increased recovery rates mean that the oil, and gas industry will be as equally likely as most other industries to see out the 21st century.

    (The technological innovations are the main reason why despite extracting over 70 million barrels a day for the past 10 years the oil reserves have increased by over 40% over the same period)
 
 
 
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