_JOKER_
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Are there any financial jobs that are not boring, not highly stressful and pays well?
1
reply
Bill_Gates
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by _JOKER_)
Are there any financial jobs that are not boring, not highly stressful and pays well?
7/10 pretty god damn boring! but not many jobs in finance are not boring.
0
reply
driftawaay
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
'Boring' is subjective.
2
reply
_JOKER_
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by driftawaay)
'Boring' is subjective.
Boring as in sitting in front of a computer screen
1
reply
hoping4Astars
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 years ago
#5
A lot of people like maths and find maths related finance jobs quite interesting. Not everyone is in it for the money!
0
reply
Potally_Tissed
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by _JOKER_)
Boring as in sitting in front of a computer screen
Pretty much any job in an office of any sort fits that description to some extent.
3
reply
Schrödingers Cat
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by hoping4Astars)
Not everyone is in it for the money!
:laugh:
11
reply
reid5532
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
lol. I think that would depend on how you take on the job. Or maybe how you define boring? How do you see a " not boring, not highly stressful and pays well" financial job anyway?
0
reply
_JOKER_
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by hoping4Astars)
A lot of people like maths and find maths related finance jobs quite interesting. Not everyone is in it for the money!
I love maths too but most of the time the computer does all the work meaning no one actually has to do the maths
1
reply
_JOKER_
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#10
(Original post by reid5532)
lol. I think that would depend on how you take on the job. Or maybe how you define boring? How do you see a " not boring, not highly stressful and pays well" financial job anyway?
I want to do a job that doesn't involve the same routine everyday, working in environment that's not hostile and pays well. Are there any jobs in finance that caters that? I've heard that investment banking is highly stressful where you dont have any friends at work and your boss is hostile? Are all finance jobs like that?
0
reply
TurboCretin
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 years ago
#11
(Original post by _JOKER_)
Boring as in sitting in front of a computer screen
Good luck getting a job in finance that doesn't involve that.
2
reply
tazarooni89
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 years ago
#12
(Original post by _JOKER_)
I love maths too but most of the time the computer does all the work meaning no one actually has to do the maths
I don't think this is really true. An Excel model can crunch numbers faster than you can in your head, but someone still needs to actually build it and tell it which calculations it needs to be doing. That person has to do a lot of Maths. It's a bit like saying a person doing a Maths exam in which calculators are permitted is not actually doing any Maths. Of course they are.

Also, whether it's boring to sit in front of a computer screen or not surely depends on what you're actually doing on the computer?
1
reply
_JOKER_
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#13
(Original post by tazarooni89)
I don't think this is really true. An Excel model can crunch numbers faster than you can in your head, but someone still needs to actually build it and tell it which calculations it needs to be doing. That person has to do a lot of Maths. It's a bit like saying a person doing a Maths exam in which calculators are permitted is not actually doing any Maths. Of course they are.

Also, whether it's boring to sit in front of a computer screen or not surely depends on what you're actually doing on the computer?
Most of the time there are software that can manipulate the numbers and produce all the documents. I don't mind a non-physical jobs but am i right in thinking most finance jobs involve the same routine? I'm most concerned about the stress tho... I've heard in investment banking the working environment is hostile with peers hunting your jobs and basically cut throat.... Am i right in thinking most finance jobs are like that.
0
reply
_JOKER_
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#14
(Original post by TurboCretin)
Good luck getting a job in finance that doesn't involve that.
I dont mind that it's the stress i'm most worried about.
0
reply
tazarooni89
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 4 years ago
#15
(Original post by _JOKER_)
Most of the time there are software that can manipulate the numbers and produce all the documents.
The software is just there to make your life a bit easier, so you don't have to do thousands of calculations all manually. But I wouldn't underestimate the amount of work that the user of the software has to do. If it was simply a case of clicking "go" and getting all the results you need, a monkey could probably be trained to do that, and people who work in finance wouldn't be getting paid as much as they are.

I don't mind a non-physical jobs but am i right in thinking most finance jobs involve the same routine?
I think most jobs involve the "same routine" to some extent, because that's how people become experienced at what they're doing. You could say a footballer's job involves the "same routine" because every day he trains or plays football, or a doctor's job involves the "same routine" because every day he's seeing and treating patients.

Some jobs in finance are like that as well, where you're essentially doing the "same thing" at regular intervals, but each time it will bring up some new challenges, and as you get more senior you'll become more experienced as to how to deal with any situation, then move more into management and direction of others. Then again some jobs in finance are not at all like that. They may be "project" based, whereby you work on one project for a few months to a year, and then once it's completed you move onto another one which had nothing to do with the first, and it's almost like starting a new job every so often.

Again, if you're worried that a job in finance is going to literally turn out to be one in which you do exactly the same thing every single day without variation, and in which "anyone could do that", look at the amount the job pays and ask yourself if any sensible employer would pay that kind of money for someone to just sit there doing the same repetitive action over and over again.

I'm most concerned about the stress tho... I've heard in investment banking the working environment is hostile with peers hunting your jobs and basically cut throat.... Am i right in thinking most finance jobs are like that.
Investment banking is a bit like that, but I don't think they're like that in general. I'm a (nearly qualified) actuary, and I must say that other than when I'm taking exams, my stress levels tend to be pretty low.
0
reply
_JOKER_
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#16
(Original post by tazarooni89)
The software is just there to make your life a bit easier, so you don't have to do thousands of calculations all manually. But I wouldn't underestimate the amount of work that the user of the software has to do. If it was simply a case of clicking "go" and getting all the results you need, a monkey could probably be trained to do that, and people who work in finance wouldn't be getting paid as much as they are.



I think most jobs involve the "same routine" to some extent, because that's how people become experienced at what they're doing. You could say a footballer's job involves the "same routine" because every day he trains or plays football, or a doctor's job involves the "same routine" because every day he's seeing and treating patients.

Some jobs in finance are like that as well, where you're essentially doing the "same thing" at regular intervals, but each time it will bring up some new challenges, and as you get more senior you'll become more experienced as to how to deal with any situation, then move more into management and direction of others. Then again some jobs in finance are not at all like that. They may be "project" based, whereby you work on one project for a few months to a year, and then once it's completed you move onto another one which had nothing to do with the first, and it's almost like starting a new job every so often.

Again, if you're worried that a job in finance is going to literally turn out to be one in which you do exactly the same thing every single day without variation, and in which "anyone could do that", look at the amount the job pays and ask yourself if any sensible employer would pay that kind of money for someone to just sit there doing the same repetitive action over and over again.



Investment banking is a bit like that, but I don't think they're like that in general. I'm a (nearly qualified) actuary, and I must say that other than when I'm taking exams, my stress levels tend to be pretty low.
Thanks for the help
The main concern for me was the stress and the hostile environment that i've read upon. I don't want to be an investment banker but what kind of jobs do you think has scope for a variety of challenges and good pay?
0
reply
tazarooni89
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 years ago
#17
(Original post by _JOKER_)
Thanks for the help
The main concern for me was the stress and the hostile environment that i've read upon. I don't want to be an investment banker but what kind of jobs do you think has scope for a variety of challenges and good pay?
It's difficult to give an exhausted list because obviously, I can only tell you what I have experience of. I work for one of the "Big Four" firms in Actuarial Consulting, and for myself I genuinely think I've found the perfect job in terms of being highly paid, challenging enough that I feel satisfied when I complete my job rather than feeling like "anyone could have done it", respectable in that it requires extensive expertise in a niche area, and low stress in that it involves working smart rather than working hard. The only downside is that the exams are really difficult and take up a lot of time, but they'll be over soon I hope. Other than this, I might have also been interested in things like Corporate Finance, Finance Consulting, Asset Management or Equity Analysis etc.
0
reply
_JOKER_
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#18
(Original post by tazarooni89)
It's difficult to give an exhausted list because obviously, I can only tell you what I have experience of. I work for one of the "Big Four" firms in Actuarial Consulting, and for myself I genuinely think I've found the perfect job in terms of being highly paid, challenging enough that I feel satisfied when I complete my job rather than feeling like "anyone could have done it", respectable in that it requires extensive expertise in a niche area, and low stress in that it involves working smart rather than working hard. The only downside is that the exams are really difficult and take up a lot of time, but they'll be over soon I hope. Other than this, I might have also been interested in things like Corporate Finance, Finance Consulting, Asset Management or Equity Analysis etc.
Thanks again
In terms of your working environment do you get along with your peers?
Also how demanding is your boss? Are u expected to give in work within a strict deadline? Would the transition from being an econ graduate to an actuary take a long time?
0
reply
tazarooni89
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#19
Report 4 years ago
#19
(Original post by _JOKER_)
In terms of your working environment do you get along with your peers?
Yes, definitely. I find that the personalities of actuaries tends to be quite gentle and toned down, being a slightly nerdy and quirky bunch of people. You do get the odd person in the office who's an arrogant idiot and thinks they're something special just because they're dressed in a suit and working in a corporate environment, but most people aren't like that.

Also how demanding is your boss? Are u expected to give in work within a strict deadline?
It depends on the project really. Personally I find that deadlines are "strict" in the sense that it wouldn't look very good if you overran them without any good reason, but they are set conservatively so you do get more than enough time to do the work that you have to.

Would the transition from being an econ graduate to an actuary take a long time?
It depends how long it takes you to pass the exams. You just set your own pace according to the amount of work you can handle. From what I've seen, it usually takes between 3 and 6 years after leaving university.
1
reply
KrisTH
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#20
Report 4 years ago
#20
My Dad does it and loves it. I did it for two weeks and ended up wanting to throw a computer out the window.

Depends on your personality and what makes you tick.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Norwich University of the Arts
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Thu, 23 Jan '20
  • SOAS University of London
    Development Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, Anthropology and Sociology, Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, Arts, Economics, Law, History, Religions and Philosophies, Politics and International Studies, Finance and Management, East Asian Languages & Cultures Postgraduate
    Sat, 25 Jan '20
  • University of Huddersfield
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 25 Jan '20

How are your mock exams going?

Love them - Feeling positive (11)
6.55%
They've been reasonable (69)
41.07%
Not feeling great... (44)
26.19%
They are TERRIBLE! (44)
26.19%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise