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    B875 - Prohibition of Public Intoxication Bill 2015, The Rt. Hon. Unown Uzer MP

    Prohibition of Public Intoxication Bill 2015
    A Bill to redefine intoxication, and to enact stricter punishments for public intoxication.

    BE IT ENACTED by the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

    1) Definitions
    1. 'Intoxication' in this bill refers to the consumption of alcohol or use of other drugs, or a combination of both alcohol and drugs by an individual, to an extent where the individual has over 170 milligrams of alcohol for every 100 millilitres of blood, over 80 micrograms of alcohol for every 100 millilitres of breath, or over 220 milligrams of alcohol for every 100 millilitres of urine, or under the influence of other drugs to an extent that the individual's normal capacity to act or reason is inhibited by that drug.
    2. 'Voluntary intoxication' refers to voluntary or 'self-induced' intoxication by an individual, and where the individual is affected by alcohol or another drug at no (or no significant) fault of his or her own. Examples of involuntary intoxication include: when an individual's food or drink is 'laced' by a third party, and the said individual consumes the 'laced' food or drink, or when the individual has been forced to take a drug against his or her will.
    3. ‘Public place' in this bill includes any premises or place to which the public have or are permitted to have access at the material time, whether on payment or otherwise.

    2) Violation and enforcement
    1. It is an offence to be voluntarily intoxicated in a public place, as defined in the definitions of this bill.
    2. It is an offence to enter or be in any mode of transport whilst voluntarily intoxicated.
    3. The police may stop any individual in public or mode of transport who they deem to be intoxicated under the definitions within this bill, and may perform a breathalyser test on the individual. Should the individual meet any requirements of intoxication as defined in this bill, the individual may be arrested and charged on 'suspicion of public intoxication'. The individual may then be taken to a police station for further testing and be detained. The individual may not be released on bail until he or she does not meet any requirement for intoxication.

    3) Punishment
    1. An individual who has been arrested for 'public intoxication' will need to appear in court for trial, and may be found guilty if it is determined by the judge that the individual has been voluntarily intoxicated in a public place.
    2. Should an individual be found guilty of 'voluntary public intoxication', he or she will be fined not less than £500, and the punishment will be decided based on the severity of the intoxication.

    4) Commencement and Extent
    1. This Act will extend to England, Wales, and Northern Ireland.
    2. This Act shall come into effect 30 days after being passed in Parliament.

    Notes:
    At the moment, the police may only get involved if an individual is so drunk they are unable to act in a manner that is reasonable, such as passing out on the street. After being held in a police station cell until sober, the individual may be cautioned, issued a Penalty Notice for Disorder (with £80 fine in ticket form), or bailed to appear at the local court.

    This bill introduces a clearer definition for intoxication, and gives police the right to arrest individuals for 'public intoxication'. This bill also raises the fine for public intoxication.

    This bill will create a safer environment, and make it more comfortable for people to go about their own business without being harassed or assaulted by an intoxicated person behaving in a lewd manner. This bill may also increase the UK’s productivity, as it can reduce the number of intoxicated individuals who enter train tracks and cause severe delays to trains, which can cost train companies millions of pounds.
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    I'm sorry, but I don't really care… :dontknow: If a drunkard assaults me, he'll be punished accordingly, first by myself, then the police.
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    Unown Uzer


    Should I live around the corner from my local bar or pub, and I choose to have a few drinks before walking home and I happen to be stopped by the police maybe 20 meters from my doorstop, should they breathalyse me and find me over the limit, would taking me to the police station and fining me be A, a completely waste of time and B, ridiculous?

    Furthermore, surely this would require more police officers on the streets, which would undoubtedly cost money.

    I believe the current laws on this matter are sufficient so I will be voting Nay.
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    This would only allow most people to drink about 3 and a half pints. Thats not enough to get drunk :confused:

    Not to mention that this is a ludicrous curb on civil liberties.
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    I support the rationale, but I don't think it's reasonably practical.
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    Nay. It's good in theory but enforcing it would be troublesome and, if you were living close to the pub, not practical to take them to the police station.
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    Nay, I agree with all the aforementioned points.

    After 8 or 9 pints I'm an absolute mess in all honesty, and I'll hop on a bus (I use the term 'hop' lightly, stumbling may be a better word to use) maybe fall asleep and miss my stop and then have a longer walk home than I predicted. During this adventure home from a piss up I wouldn't be noisy, I may be a bit embarrassing but what can you do I suppose, and wouldn't have infringed on anybody's civil liberties at all. This bill is way too preemptive and I believe it goes against "innocent until proven guilty".


    Also, PetrosAC The pub you live round the corner from is crap, I've been there, you'd be better off trekking to camden for some drinks.
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    Nay. Absolutely ludicrous. It won't do anything only create civil unrest.
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    (Original post by James Milibanter)
    Nay, I agree with all the aforementioned points.

    After 8 or 9 pints I'm an absolute mess in all honesty, and I'll hop on a bus (I use the term 'hop' lightly, stumbling may be a better word to use) maybe fall asleep and miss my stop and then have a longer walk home than I predicted. During this adventure home from a piss up I wouldn't be noisy, I may be a bit embarrassing but what can you do I suppose, and wouldn't have infringed on anybody's civil liberties at all. This bill is way too preemptive and I believe it goes against "innocent until proven guilty".


    Also, PetrosAC The pub you live round the corner from is crap, I've been there, you'd be better off trekking to camden for some drinks.
    Really need to go drinking in Camden some time, just an ass to get to back to Ruislip.

    But I agree, I believe that the bill had innocent enough intentions but it is not practical by any stretch of the meaning, also it is very authoritarian which I am against. Top marks for effort, a well written and presented bill
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    Mr Speaker,I believe I am the Rt. Hon. Unown Uzer MP, not the Hon. Unown Uzer MP.
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    (Original post by Unown Uzer)
    Mr Speaker,I believe I am the Rt. Hon. Unown Uzer MP, not the Hon. Unown Uzer MP.
    The OP has been amended. Until the new Privy Council list is confirmed I'll stick with Honourable as standard - members can then correct me if they are Right Honourable.
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    (Original post by Kay_Winters)
    Really need to go drinking in Camden some time, just an ass to get to back to Ruislip.

    But I agree, I believe that the bill had innocent enough intentions but it is not practical by any stretch of the meaning, also it is very authoritarian which I am against. Top marks for effort, a well written and presented bill
    Wow, I had no idea you were a Londoner, the Electric Ballroom is highly recommended from myself if you do ever plan on popping down.
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    At the moment, the police may only get involved if an individual is so drunk they are unable to act in a manner that is reasonable, such as passing out on the street. After being held in a police station cell until sober, the individual may be cautioned, issued a Penalty Notice for Disorder (with £80 fine in ticket form), or bailed to appear at the local court.
    The notes say it all really. The police can already use powers if the person is not behaving reasonably. This implies the bill's author wants the police to have powers to deal with someone who is acting perfectly reasonably - the very definition of a police state.

    At the moment the matter can be dealt with by use of a fixed penalty. This proposed law would necessarily involve police time and expense in court hearings for what are, essentially, trivial matters.

    Another example of proposed legislation that hasn't passed through anyone's brain and been analysed before publication.
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    (Original post by James Milibanter)
    Wow, I had no idea you were a Londoner, the Electric Ballroom is highly recommended from myself if you do ever plan on popping down.
    At risk of derailing the thread I am a Londoner yeah, I'm in Boris' constituency
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    (Original post by PetrosAC)
    Unown Uzer


    Should I live around the corner from my local bar or pub, and I choose to have a few drinks before walking home and I happen to be stopped by the police maybe 20 meters from my doorstop, should they breathalyse me and find me over the limit, would taking me to the police station and fining me be A, a completely waste of time and B, ridiculous?

    Furthermore, surely this would require more police officers on the streets, which would undoubtedly cost money.

    I believe the current laws on this matter are sufficient so I will be voting Nay.
    To answer your question, yes, so if you do not want to get arrested, do not go over the limit.
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    (Original post by Unown Uzer)
    To answer your question, yes, so if you do not want to get arrested, do not go over the limit.
    The limit is ridiculously low.
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    (Original post by Birchington)
    The OP has been amended. Until the new Privy Council list is confirmed I'll stick with Honourable as standard - members can then correct me if they are Right Honourable.
    Thank you.
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    (Original post by Unown Uzer)
    To answer your question, yes, so if you do not want to get arrested, do not go over the limit.
    In that case, I urge all members to vote Nay should this go to division.
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    Absolutely not. I shall not repeat the comments of (Rt) Hon members.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    The notes say it all really. The police can already use powers if the person is not behaving reasonably. This implies the bill's author wants the police to have powers to deal with someone who is acting perfectly reasonably - the very definition of a police state.

    At the moment the matter can be dealt with by use of a fixed penalty. This proposed law would necessarily involve police time and expense in court hearings for what are, essentially, trivial matters.

    Another example of proposed legislation that hasn't passed through anyone's brain and been analysed before publication.
    This bill sets out a standard to which police need to follow in order to arrest someone for public intoxication. At the moment, there is no clear standard, so police need to use their own judgement in determining whether someone is intoxicated to the extent that they are unable to act reasonably, which is not the most reliable way of determining whether someone is intoxicated. Under this bill, a breathalyser will be used, so it can be clear whether someone is intoxicated or not.
 
 
 
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