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Do modern British people usually drink loose leaf tea or use tea bags? watch

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    Well, with so many Americans around, you probably knew that this question about tea was going to come up. I'm sure you've all been asked this a lot by tourists. LOL.

    In the US, tea is a beverage that people drink as a coffee replacement if they don't like the taste of coffee. We usually buy tea bags and steep them in coffee mugs for about five minutes, and occasionally add sugar, milk, or even coffee creamer to sweeten it.

    When we think of British people drinking tea, we usually picture people with actual tea cups using loose leaf tea prepared with an old-fashioned tea pot and kettle, perhaps taking time to serve them with scones and actually going the whole nine yards to have "a proper tea".

    So, do British people still actually go to all the trouble of making tea properly, or has the advent of tea bags made people lazier about tea preparation in Britain as well?
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    (Original post by jeremy1988)
    When we think of British people drinking tea, we usually picture people with actual tea cups using loose leaf tea prepared with an old-fashioned tea pot and kettle, perhaps taking time to serve them with scones and actually going the whole nine yards to have "a proper tea".
    For the majority of the population I'd say this is somewhere between unusual and alien.

    Like most English social habits it's a bit of a class thing. I'm sure it's not a rarity in rural bits of the home counties, for example, but in, say, Liverpool or East London I would say it is.
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    I don't know anyone who doesn't use tea bags. And what kind of madman doesn't have milk in their tea?!?!? Insanity.

    And the vast majority of those who do brew up with a tea pot STILL use teabags. Loose leaves are just taking the p*ss imo. :mad:
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    Tea bags....

    After about 12 attempts of trying to throw the teabag into the mug from across the kitchen usually.
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    I like loose tea hahah
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    Depends on the tea. If I want chai masala then I'll use a tea bag, but some fruit ones I'll have loose.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    For the majority of the population I'd say this is somewhere between unusual and alien.

    Like most English social habits it's a bit of a class thing. I'm sure it's not a rarity in rural bits of the home counties, for example, but in, say, Liverpool or East London I would say it is.
    That makes sense. The only people I know in the US that would try to serve tea in any manner similar to that are usually old-fashioned women on the East Coast that attended a ladies finishing school or something. Apparently they're not just emulating the British in general, they're emulating the upper classes.

    Of course, there are also the tea "nerds" that go out of their way to use loose leaf teas and tea cups just because they believe it's correct, and tell everyone that uses a tea bag that they're wrong, and claim that they had a British friend tell them no one in Britain uses tea bags. I hear people repeating it a lot and spreading it around, but I've never actually heard anyone from Britain saying it.
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    I don't even drink tea, I'd say most people I know do, but I've never known anyone to go the whole nine yards and use a proper tea pot with little cups and saucers served with scones. Kettle and a mug and that's it really. TP has hit the nail on the head with the class thing btw.

    It's more likely to be with a fried breakfast or just nothing at all. Doesn't have to be a posh thing, builder's tea and all that.Tea bags in boiling water in a mug for about 20 seconds, stir and add a tiny bit of milk and sugar is optional. The brand is usually Tetleys, Typhoo or Yorkshire Tea. Do you get any of those of the US btw?

    Make us a brew m8.
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    Tea has to be in a bag, loose tea is too much of a hassle!
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    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FtK_vfp8po8

    :lol:
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    (Original post by Wilfred Little)
    I don't even drink tea, I'd say most people I know do, but I've never known anyone to go the whole nine yards and use a proper tea pot with little cups and saucers served with scones. Kettle and a mug and that's it really. TP has hit the nail on the head with the class thing btw.
    So, when you're talking about a using a mug for tea, you're talking about the same kind of mugs we use for coffee here in the states? We even joke with each other that we're drinking tea the "redneck" way by using coffee mugs because we're too cheap to buy tea cups.
    It's more likely to be with a fried breakfast or just nothing at all. Doesn't have to be a posh thing, builder's tea and all that.Tea bags in boiling water in a mug for about 20 seconds, stir and add a tiny bit of milk and sugar is optional. The brand is usually Tetleys, Typhoo or Yorkshire Tea. Do you get any of those of the US btw?
    I've definitely seen of Tetley's and Typhoo, and I think I've seen Yorkshire Tea in some tea emporiums, but not on the shelf at the supermarket.

    The most common teas here (aside from iced tea, of course) are Twining's, Celestial Seasons, and Bigelow. Twining's is definitely the biggest name in tea around here, and CS is for herbal teas while Bigelow is for people that want to "buy American" in order to counter people who might joke that they're unpatriotic or stuck up for drinking tea.

    Most people like Earl Grey, Lady Grey, and Orange Pekoe, but I prefer Irish Breakfast Tea, Lapsang Souchong, and Prince of Wales. I actually ended up trying most of Twining's teas in a sampler package, and those three were the ones I liked.
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    (Original post by jeremy1988)
    That makes sense. The only people I know in the US that would try to serve tea in any manner similar to that are usually old-fashioned women on the East Coast that attended a ladies finishing school or something. Apparently they're not just emulating the British in general, they're emulating the upper classes.

    Of course, there are also the tea "nerds" that go out of their way to use loose leaf teas and tea cups just because they believe it's correct, and tell everyone that uses a tea bag that they're wrong, and claim that they had a British friend tell them no one in Britain uses tea bags. I hear people repeating it a lot and spreading it around, but I've never actually heard anyone from Britain saying it.
    It isn't just upper class ladies who drink loose leaf tea. There are some young hipster types who do, but also it's an age thing, quite a few older people do - my grandmother does and she isn't upper class. Strictly middle.

    There's a bit of a comeback going on for tea in the UK. Until a few years ago, it was all coffee, coffee, coffee, but lots of new brands have appeared and people are trying unusual flavoured teas and things like that. There's definitely a tea snobbery in the air in parts of London.
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    (Original post by jeremy1988)
    So, when you're talking about a using a mug for tea, you're talking about the same kind of mugs we use for coffee here in the states? We even joke with each other that we're drinking tea the "redneck" way by using coffee mugs because we're too cheap to buy tea cups.
    Yeah man, just normal mugs.



    :cool:

    I've definitely seen of Tetley's and Typhoo, and I think I've seen Yorkshire Tea in some tea emporiums, but not on the shelf at the supermarket.

    The most common teas here (aside from iced tea, of course) are Twining's, Celestial Seasons, and Bigelow. Twining's is definitely the biggest name in tea around here, and CS is for herbal teas while Bigelow is for people that want to "buy American" in order to counter people who might joke that they're unpatriotic or stuck up for drinking tea.

    Most people like Earl Grey, Lady Grey, and Orange Pekoe, but I prefer Irish Breakfast Tea, Lapsang Souchong, and Prince of Wales. I actually ended up trying most of Twining's teas in a sampler package, and those three were the ones I liked.
    Nice one. I don't think I've had any of those, but I don't drink tea anyway. Black coffee
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    i don't like loose tea much as it's quite strong. I don't brew mine either, just push it around a bit xD it HAS to have milk though o.o
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    It isn't just upper class ladies who drink loose leaf tea. There are some young hipster types who do, but also it's an age thing, quite a few older people do - my grandmother does and she isn't upper class. Strictly middle.

    There's a bit of a comeback going on for tea in the UK. Until a few years ago, it was all coffee, coffee, coffee, but lots of new brands have appeared and people are trying unusual flavoured teas and things like that. There's definitely a tea snobbery in the air in parts of London.
    I was wondering if it might be an age thing as well.

    Yeah, those are kind of like the tea "nerds" I was talking about. It's becoming more popular here, too. There are some people who are trying to find something called "whole leaf" tea. That is, fresh leaves that haven't even been crushed. I never would have imagined that anyone cared about that until recently. Clearly, some people really are passionate about quality tea leaves.

    Most people are probably going to stick with coffee in the end, but I have seen a surprising number of tea cafes and emporiums appearing here in Dallas in the past few years.
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    Tea bags. Nobody has time be titting about with loose leaf. To blend in you need a Sports Direct mug as well.

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    The vast majority use tea bags
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    When i want a quick mug of tea i use bags. When i have the time i make me some fire Adeni tea where i use loose tea with evaporated milk.
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    loads of tea are in bags. all the fruit ones i drink and the 'usual' tea that british drink with the milk is in bags. the only loose leaf tea in my house is the green tea, but it's not as such a product brought in a british shop but an asian market, where green tea leaves are popped into a package ready to be used, without a tea bag.
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    Depends on how I feel. If I feel lazy then tea bags, if not I properly brew tea in a saucepan and add spices for good measure
 
 
 
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